Transitions help your readers move between ideas within a paragraph, between paragraphs, or between sections of your argument. When you are deciding how to transition from one idea to the next, your goal should be to help readers see how your ideas are connected—and how those ideas connect to the big picture.

One useful way to do this is to start with old information and then introduce new information. When you begin a sentence or a paragraph with information that is familiar to your readers, you help your readers make connections between your ideas. For example, consider the difference between these two pairs of sentences below:  

Sentence pair #1: Ineffective Transition

Some experts argue that focusing on individual actions to combat climate change takes the focus away from the collective action required to keep carbon levels from rising. Change will not be effected, say some others, unless individual actions raise the necessary awareness.

While a reader can see the connection between the sentences above, it’s not immediately clear that the second sentence is providing a counterargument to the first. In the example below, key “old information” is repeated in the second sentence to help readers quickly see the connection. This makes the sequence of ideas easier to follow.  

Sentence pair #2: Effective Transition

Some experts argue that focusing on individual actions to combat climate change takes the focus away from the collective action required to keep carbon levels from rising. Other experts argue that individual actions are key to raising the awareness necessary to effect change.

You can use this same technique to create clear transitions between paragraphs. Here’s an example:

Some experts argue that focusing on individual actions to combat climate change takes the focus away from the collective action required to keep carbon levels from rising. Other experts argue that individual actions are key to raising the awareness necessary to effect change. According to Annie Lowery, individual actions are important to making social change because when individuals take action, they can change values, which can lead to more people becoming invested in fighting climate change. She writes, “Researchers believe that these kinds of household-led trends can help avert climate catastrophe, even if government and corporate actions are far more important” (Lowery).

So, what’s an individual household supposed to do?

The repetition of the word “household” in the new paragraph helps readers see the connection between what has come before (a discussion of whether household actions matter) and what is about to come (a proposal for what types of actions households can take to combat climate change).

Sometimes, transitional words can help readers see how ideas are connected. But it’s not enough to just include a “therefore,” “moreover,” “also,” or “in addition.” You should choose these words carefully to show your readers what kind of connection you are making between your ideas.

To decide which transitional word to use, start by identifying the relationship between your ideas. For example, you might be

  • making a comparison or showing a contrast Transitional words that compare and contrast include also, in the same way, similarly, in contrast, yet, on the one hand, on the other hand. But before you signal comparison, ask these questions: Do your readers need another example of the same thing? Is there a new nuance in this next point that distinguishes it from the previous example? For those relationships between ideas, you might try this type of transition: While x may appear the same, it actually raises a new question in a slightly different way. 
  • expressing agreement or disagreement When you are making an argument, you need to signal to readers where you stand in relation to other scholars and critics. You may agree with another person’s claim, you may want to concede some part of the argument even if you don’t agree with everything, or you may disagree. Transitional words that signal agreement, concession, and disagreement include however, nevertheless, actually, still, despite, admittedly, still, on the contrary, nonetheless .
  • showing cause and effect Transitional phrases that show cause and effect include therefore, hence, consequently, thus, so. Before you choose one of these words, make sure that what you are about to illustrate is really a causal link. Novice writers tend to add therefore and hence when they aren’t sure how to transition; you should reserve these words for when they accurately signal the progression of your ideas.
  • explaining or elaborating Transitions can signal to readers that you are going to expand on a point that you have just made or explain something further. Transitional words that signal explanation or elaboration include in other words, for example, for instance, in particular, that is, to illustrate, moreover .
  • drawing conclusions You can use transitions to signal to readers that you are moving from the body of your argument to your conclusions. Before you use transitional words to signal conclusions, consider whether you can write a stronger conclusion by creating a transition that shows the relationship between your ideas rather than by flagging the paragraph simply as a conclusion. Transitional words that signal a conclusion include in conclusion , as a result, ultimately, overall— but strong conclusions do not necessarily have to include those phrases.

If you’re not sure which transitional words to use—or whether to use one at all—see if you can explain the connection between your paragraphs or sentence either out loud or in the margins of your draft.

For example, if you write a paragraph in which you summarize physician Atul Gawande’s argument about the value of incremental care, and then you move on to a paragraph that challenges those ideas, you might write down something like this next to the first paragraph: “In this paragraph I summarize Gawande’s main claim.” Then, next to the second paragraph, you might write, “In this paragraph I present a challenge to Gawande’s main claim.” Now that you have identified the relationship between those two paragraphs, you can choose the most effective transition between them. Since the second paragraph in this example challenges the ideas in the first, you might begin with something like “but,” or “however,” to signal that shift for your readers.  

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Transition signals In addition... However... Likewise...

Transition signals are useful in achieving good cohesion and coherence in your writing. This page gives information on what transition signals are , the grammar of transition signals, and different types of transition signals. There is also an example essay at the end in which you can highlight the different types of transition signal, as well as some exercises to help you practice this area.

What are transition signals?

transitions

For another look at the same content, check out YouTube or Youku , or the infographic .

Transition signals, along with repeated words and reference words, are one of the main ways to achieve good cohesion and coherence in your writing. They are therefore a way to help ensure that your ideas and sentences cohere or 'stick together'. Transition signals are used to signal relationships between ideas in your writing. For example, the transition signal 'for example' is used to give examples, while the word 'while' is used to show a contrast. In addition, there are phrases like 'in addition' for adding new ideas. Likewise there are words such as 'likewise' to connect similar ideas.

Grammar of transition signals

transitions1

Check out the transition signals infographic »

Broadly speaking, transition signals can be divided into three types:

  • sentence connectors
  • clause connectors
  • other connectors

Sentence connectors are used to connect two sentences together. They are joined by a full-stop (period) or semi-colon, and are followed by a comma. The following are examples of sentence connectors.

  • Transition signals are very useful. However , they should not be used to begin every sentence.
  • Transition signals are very useful; however , they should not be used to begin every sentence.
  • Contrast signals are one type of transition signals. In addition , there are others such as compare signals and addition signals.
  • There are three main ways to improve cohesion in your writing. First , you can use transition signals.

Clause connectors are used to connect two clauses together to form one sentence. They are joined by a comma. The following are examples of clause connectors.

  • Transition signals are very useful, but they should not be used to begin every sentence.
  • Although transition signals are very useful, they should not be used to begin every sentence.
  • Contrast signals are one type of transition signal, and there are others such as compare signals and addition signals.

Other connectors follow different grammar patterns. Many are followed by noun phrases. Some are verbs and should therefore be used as verbs in a sentence. The following are examples of other connectors.

  • Despite their importance in achieving cohesion, transition signals should not be used to begin every sentence.
  • Good cohesion is the result of using repeated words, reference words, and transition signals.
  • It is clear that careful use of transition signals will improve the cohesion in your writing.
  • Contrast signals are one type of transition signal. Another type is comparison signals.

Types of transition signals

transitions2

For another look at the same content, check out the video on YouTube (also available on Youku ).

Below are examples of different types of transition signals. They are divided by type, and sub-divided according to grammar. More information on some of these is given in relevant essay sections. You can also check out the second YouTube video on the EAP Foundation YouTube channel , which looks at types in more detail, with example sentences.

To introduce an additional idea

Sentence connectors

  • furthermore
  • in addition
  • additionally

Clause connectors

  • another (+ noun)
  • an additional (+ noun)

For more on comparison signals, see the compare and contrast essays section.

  • in the same way
  • both... and
  • not only... but also
  • neither... nor
  • to be similar to
  • to be alike
  • to be similar

To contrast

For more on contrast signals, see the compare and contrast essays section.

  • in contrast
  • in/by comparison
  • on the other hand
  • compared to/with
  • to be different (from)
  • to be dissimilar
  • to be unlike
  • to differ (from)

To show concession

Concession transitions show an unexpected result. They are similar to but not the same as contrast transitions. E.g. Although the sun was shining, he took an umbrella to work. [The sun shining means taking an umbrella is unexpected.]

  • nevertheless
  • nonetheless
  • even though
  • despite (+ noun)
  • in spite of (+ noun)

To introduce a cause/reason

For more on cause signals, see the cause and effect essays section.

  • for this reason
  • to result from
  • to be the result of
  • to be the effect of
  • to be the consequence of
  • as a result of
  • as a consequence of

To introduce an effect/result

For more on effect signals, see the cause and effect essays section.

  • as a result
  • as a consequence
  • consequently
  • to result in
  • to have an effect on
  • the cause of
  • the reason for

To give an example

  • for example
  • for instance
  • in this case
  • such as (+ noun)
  • an example of (+ noun)
  • to demonstrate

To show chronological order

  • first, second, etc.
  • first of all
  • the first, the second
  • the next, the last, the final
  • before (lunch etc.)
  • after (the war etc.)
  • since (1970 etc.)
  • in the year (2000 etc.)

To show order of importance

  • first and foremost
  • more/most importantly
  • a more important
  • the most important
  • the second most significant
  • the primary

To show an alternative

  • alternatively

To identify or clarify

  • in other words
  • specifically

To reinforce

To conclude.

  • in conclusion
  • to summarise
  • to conclude
  • It is clear that...
  • We can see that...
  • The evidence suggests...
  • These examples show...

Example essay

Below is an example essay. It is the one used in the persuasion essay section. Click on the different areas (in the shaded boxes to the right) to highlight the different types of transition signal in this essay.

Title: Consider whether human activity has made the world a better place.

History shows that human beings have come a long way from where they started. They have developed new technologies which means that everybody can enjoy luxuries they never previously imagined. However , the technologies that are temporarily making this world a better place to live could well prove to be an ultimate disaster due to , among other things, the creation of nuclear weapons, increasing pollution, and loss of animal species. The biggest threat to the earth caused by modern human activity comes from the creation of nuclear weapons. Although it cannot be denied that countries have to defend themselves, the kind of weapons that some of them currently possess are far in excess of what is needed for defence. If these weapons were used, they could lead to the destruction of the entire planet. Another harm caused by human activity to this earth is pollution. People have become reliant on modern technology, which can have adverse effects on the environment. For example , reliance on cars causes air and noise pollution. Even seemingly innocent devices, such as computers and mobile phones, use electricity, most of which is produced from coal-burning power stations, which further adds to environmental pollution. If we do not curb our direct and indirect use of fossil fuels, the harm to the environment may be catastrophic. Animals are an important feature of this earth and the past decades have witnessed the extinction of a considerable number of animal species. This is the consequence of human encroachment on wildlife habitats, for example deforestation to expand human cities. Some may argue that such loss of species is natural and has occurred throughout earth's history. However , the current rate of species loss far exceeds normal levels, and is threatening to become a mass extinction event. In summary , there is no doubt that current human activities such as the creation of nuclear weapons, pollution, and destruction of wildlife, are harmful to the earth. It is important for us to see not only the short-term effects of our actions, but their long-term effects as well. Otherwise , human activities will be just another step towards destruction.

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Compare & contrast essays examine the similarities of two or more objects, and the differences.

Cause & effect essays consider the reasons (or causes) for something, then discuss the results (or effects).

Discussion essays require you to examine both sides of a situation and to conclude by saying which side you favour.

Problem-solution essays are a sub-type of SPSE essays (Situation, Problem, Solution, Evaluation).

Transition signals are useful in achieving good cohesion and coherence in your writing.

Reporting verbs are used to link your in-text citations to the information cited.

The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Transitions

What this handout is about.

In this crazy, mixed-up world of ours, transitions glue our ideas and our essays together. This handout will introduce you to some useful transitional expressions and help you employ them effectively.

The function and importance of transitions

In both academic writing and professional writing, your goal is to convey information clearly and concisely, if not to convert the reader to your way of thinking. Transitions help you to achieve these goals by establishing logical connections between sentences, paragraphs, and sections of your papers. In other words, transitions tell readers what to do with the information you present to them. Whether single words, quick phrases, or full sentences, they function as signs that tell readers how to think about, organize, and react to old and new ideas as they read through what you have written.

Transitions signal relationships between ideas—relationships such as: “Another example coming up—stay alert!” or “Here’s an exception to my previous statement” or “Although this idea appears to be true, here’s the real story.” Basically, transitions provide the reader with directions for how to piece together your ideas into a logically coherent argument. Transitions are not just verbal decorations that embellish your paper by making it sound or read better. They are words with particular meanings that tell the reader to think and react in a particular way to your ideas. In providing the reader with these important cues, transitions help readers understand the logic of how your ideas fit together.

Signs that you might need to work on your transitions

How can you tell whether you need to work on your transitions? Here are some possible clues:

  • Your instructor has written comments like “choppy,” “jumpy,” “abrupt,” “flow,” “need signposts,” or “how is this related?” on your papers.
  • Your readers (instructors, friends, or classmates) tell you that they had trouble following your organization or train of thought.
  • You tend to write the way you think—and your brain often jumps from one idea to another pretty quickly.
  • You wrote your paper in several discrete “chunks” and then pasted them together.
  • You are working on a group paper; the draft you are working on was created by pasting pieces of several people’s writing together.

Organization

Since the clarity and effectiveness of your transitions will depend greatly on how well you have organized your paper, you may want to evaluate your paper’s organization before you work on transitions. In the margins of your draft, summarize in a word or short phrase what each paragraph is about or how it fits into your analysis as a whole. This exercise should help you to see the order of and connection between your ideas more clearly.

If after doing this exercise you find that you still have difficulty linking your ideas together in a coherent fashion, your problem may not be with transitions but with organization. For help in this area (and a more thorough explanation of the “reverse outlining” technique described in the previous paragraph), please see the Writing Center’s handout on organization .

How transitions work

The organization of your written work includes two elements: (1) the order in which you have chosen to present the different parts of your discussion or argument, and (2) the relationships you construct between these parts. Transitions cannot substitute for good organization, but they can make your organization clearer and easier to follow. Take a look at the following example:

El Pais , a Latin American country, has a new democratic government after having been a dictatorship for many years. Assume that you want to argue that El Pais is not as democratic as the conventional view would have us believe.

One way to effectively organize your argument would be to present the conventional view and then to provide the reader with your critical response to this view. So, in Paragraph A you would enumerate all the reasons that someone might consider El Pais highly democratic, while in Paragraph B you would refute these points. The transition that would establish the logical connection between these two key elements of your argument would indicate to the reader that the information in paragraph B contradicts the information in paragraph A. As a result, you might organize your argument, including the transition that links paragraph A with paragraph B, in the following manner:

Paragraph A: points that support the view that El Pais’s new government is very democratic.

Transition: Despite the previous arguments, there are many reasons to think that El Pais’s new government is not as democratic as typically believed.

Paragraph B: points that contradict the view that El Pais’s new government is very democratic.

In this case, the transition words “Despite the previous arguments,” suggest that the reader should not believe paragraph A and instead should consider the writer’s reasons for viewing El Pais’s democracy as suspect.

As the example suggests, transitions can help reinforce the underlying logic of your paper’s organization by providing the reader with essential information regarding the relationship between your ideas. In this way, transitions act as the glue that binds the components of your argument or discussion into a unified, coherent, and persuasive whole.

Types of transitions

Now that you have a general idea of how to go about developing effective transitions in your writing, let us briefly discuss the types of transitions your writing will use.

The types of transitions available to you are as diverse as the circumstances in which you need to use them. A transition can be a single word, a phrase, a sentence, or an entire paragraph. In each case, it functions the same way: First, the transition either directly summarizes the content of a preceding sentence, paragraph, or section or implies such a summary (by reminding the reader of what has come before). Then, it helps the reader anticipate or comprehend the new information that you wish to present.

  • Transitions between sections: Particularly in longer works, it may be necessary to include transitional paragraphs that summarize for the reader the information just covered and specify the relevance of this information to the discussion in the following section.
  • Transitions between paragraphs: If you have done a good job of arranging paragraphs so that the content of one leads logically to the next, the transition will highlight a relationship that already exists by summarizing the previous paragraph and suggesting something of the content of the paragraph that follows. A transition between paragraphs can be a word or two (however, for example, similarly), a phrase, or a sentence. Transitions can be at the end of the first paragraph, at the beginning of the second paragraph, or in both places.
  • Transitions within paragraphs: As with transitions between sections and paragraphs, transitions within paragraphs act as cues by helping readers to anticipate what is coming before they read it. Within paragraphs, transitions tend to be single words or short phrases.

Transitional expressions

Effectively constructing each transition often depends upon your ability to identify words or phrases that will indicate for the reader the kind of logical relationships you want to convey. The table below should make it easier for you to find these words or phrases. Whenever you have trouble finding a word, phrase, or sentence to serve as an effective transition, refer to the information in the table for assistance. Look in the left column of the table for the kind of logical relationship you are trying to express. Then look in the right column of the table for examples of words or phrases that express this logical relationship.

Keep in mind that each of these words or phrases may have a slightly different meaning. Consult a dictionary or writer’s handbook if you are unsure of the exact meaning of a word or phrase.

You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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Transition Sentences | Tips & Examples for Clear Writing

Published on June 9, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

Clear transitions are crucial to clear writing: They show the reader how different parts of your essay, paper, or thesis are connected. Transition sentences can be used to structure your text and link together paragraphs or sections.

… In this case, the researchers concluded that the method was unreliable.

However , evidence from a more recent study points to a different conclusion . …

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Table of contents

Transitioning between paragraphs, transitioning to a new section, transitions within a paragraph, other interesting articles.

When you start a new paragraph , the first sentence should clearly express:

  • What this paragraph will discuss
  • How it relates to the previous paragraph

The examples below show some examples of transition sentences between paragraphs and what they express.

Placement of transition sentences

The beginning of a new paragraph is generally the right place for a transition sentence. Each paragraph should focus on one topic, so avoid spending time at the end of a paragraph explaining the theme of the next one.

The first dissenter to consider is …

However, several scholars dissent from this consensus. The first one to consider is …

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While transitions between paragraphs are generally a single sentence, when you start a new section in a longer text, you may need an entire transition paragraph. Transitioning to a new section involves summarizing the content of the previous section and expressing how the new one will build upon or depart from it.

For example, the following sentences might be an effective transition for a new section in a literary analysis essay.

Having established that the subjective experience of time is one of Mann’s key concerns in The Magic Mountain , it is now possible to explore how this theme facilitates the novel’s connection with World War I. The war itself is not narrated in the book, but rather hinted at as something awaiting Castorp beyond the final pages. In this way, Mann links his protagonist’s subjective experience of time to more than just his illness; it is also used to explore the period leading up to the outbreak of war.

As in academic writing generally, aim to be as concise as you can while maintaining clarity: If you can transition to a new section clearly with a single sentence, do so, but use more when necessary.

It’s also important to use effective transitions within each paragraph you write, leading the reader through your arguments efficiently and avoiding ambiguity.

The known-new contract

The order of information within each of your sentences is important to the cohesion of your text. The known-new contract , a useful writing concept, states that a new sentence should generally begin with some reference to information from the previous sentence, and then go on to connect it to new information.

In the following example, the second sentence doesn’t follow very clearly from the first. The connection only becomes clear when we reach the end.

By reordering the information in the second sentence so that it begins with a reference to the first, we can help the reader follow our argument more smoothly.

Note that the known-new contract is just a general guideline. Not every sentence needs to be structured this way, but it’s a useful technique if you’re struggling to make your sentences cohere.

Transition words and phrases

Using appropriate transition words helps show your reader connections within and between sentences. Transition words and phrases come in four main types:

  • Additive transitions, which introduce new information or examples
  • Adversative transitions, which signal a contrast or departure from the previous text
  • Causal transitions, which are used to describe cause and effect
  • Sequential transitions, which indicate a sequence

The table below gives a few examples for each type:

Grouping similar information

While transition words and phrases are essential, and every essay will contain at least some of them, it’s also important to avoid overusing them. One way to do this is by grouping similar information together so that fewer transitions are needed.

For example, the following text uses three transition words and jumps back and forth between ideas. This makes it repetitive and difficult to follow.

Rewriting it to group similar information allows us to use just one transition, making the text more concise and readable.

If you want to know more about AI tools , college essays , or fallacies make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples or go directly to our tools!

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Transition Signals in Writing

What are transition signals.

Transition signals are connecting words or phrases that strengthen the internal cohesion of your writing. Transition signals act like bridges between parts of your writing. They link your sentences and paragraphs together smoothly so that they flow and there are no abrupt jumps or breaks between ideas.

Transition signals also act like signposts making it easier for the reader to follow your ideas. They help carry over a thought from one sentence to another, from one paragraph to another, or between separate sentences, paragraphs or topics.

There are several types of transition signals. Some lead your reader forward and imply the building of an idea or thought, while others make your reader compare ideas or draw conclusions from the preceding thoughts.

Sample text

The following words and phrases can be used to indicate transitions and to cue your reader about how ideas are logically connected in your writing. This list is also helpful for providing alternative options if you find yourself constantly using the same linking word or phrase.

To indicate sequence or to logically order ideas

first, second, third etc.

followed by

before, after

next, finally

previously, subsequently

initially, followed by

concurrently

at that time

To refer to a specific incident or example

for example

to illustrate

for instance

in the case of case

specifically

in this case

on this occasion

To provide emphasis or indicate importance

particularly

To indicate time

at that/this point

immediately

simultaneously

then, later

at that/ this time

To compare and/ or contrast

To compare:

  • on the one hand
  • correspondingly

in the same way

To contrast:

in contrast

on the other hand

  • a different view is

on the contrary

  • differing from
  • balanced against
  • by/ in comparison

To indicate result or cause and effect

as a result (of this)

consequently

as a consequence

accordingly

for this reason

because (of this)

so much (so) that

To introduce a similar idea

To add another idea or more information.

in addition

furthermore

it could also be said

additionally

To introduce an opposite idea, to show exception or concession

alternatively

it could also be said that

nevertheless

despite/in spite of (this)

even though

nonetheless

notwithstanding (this)

regardless (of this)

To give an example

take the case of

to demonstrate

To identify or clarify

that is (to say)

in other words

To summarise or conclude

on the whole

in conclusion

as a result

to summarise

  • Transition signals in writing
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So you have a main idea, and you have supporting ideas, but how can you be sure that your readers will understand the relationships between them? How are the ideas tied to each other? One way to emphasize these relationships is through the use of clear transitions between ideas. Like every other part of your essay, transitions have a job to do. They form logical connections between the ideas presented in an essay or paragraph, and they give readers clues that reveal how you want them to think about (process, organize, or use) the topics presented.

Why are Transitions Important?

Transitions signal the order of ideas, highlight relationships, unify concepts, and let readers know what’s coming next or remind them about what’s already been covered. When instructors or peers comment that your writing is choppy, abrupt, or needs to “flow better,” those are some signals that you might need to work on building some better transitions into your writing. If a reader comments that she’s not sure how something relates to your thesis or main idea, a transition is probably the right tool for the job.

When Is the Right Time to Build in Transitions?

There’s no right answer to this question. Sometimes transitions occur spontaneously, but just as often (or maybe even more often) good transitions are developed in revision. While drafting, we often write what we think, sometimes without much reflection about how the ideas fit together or relate to one another. If your thought process jumps around a lot (and that’s okay), it’s more likely that you will need to pay careful attention to reorganization and to providing solid transitions as you revise.

When you’re working on building transitions into an essay, consider the essay’s overall organization. Consider using reverse outlining and other organizational strategies presented in this text to identify key ideas in your essay and to get a clearer look at how the ideas can be best organized. See the “ Reverse Outlining ” section in the “Revision” portion of this text, for a great strategy to help you assess what’s going on in your essay and to help you see what topics and organization are developing. This can help you determine where transitions are needed.

Let’s take some time to consider the importance of transitions at the sentence level and transitions between paragraphs.

Sentence-Level Transitions

Transitions between sentences often use “connecting words” to emphasize relationships between one sentence and another. A friend and coworker suggests the “something old something new” approach, meaning that the idea behind a transition is to introduce something new while connecting it to something old from an earlier point in the essay or paragraph. Here are some examples of ways that writers use connecting words (highlighted with red text and italicized) to show connections between ideas in adjacent sentences:

To Show Similarity

When I was growing up, my mother taught me to say “please” and “thank you” as one small way that I could show appreciation and respect for others. In the same way , I have tried to impress the importance of manners on my own children.

Other connecting words that show similarity include also , similarly , and likewise .

To Show Contrast

Some scientists take the existence of black holes for granted; however , in 2014, a physicist at the University of North Carolina claimed to have mathematically proven that they do not exist.

Other connecting words that show contrast include in spite of , on the other hand , in contrast , and yet .

To Exemplify

The cost of college tuition is higher than ever, so students are becoming increasingly motivated to keep costs as low as possible. For example , a rising number of students are signing up to spend their first two years at a less costly community college before transferring to a more expensive four-year school to finish their degrees.

Other connecting words that show example include for instance , specifically , and to illustrate .

To Show Cause and Effect

Where previously painters had to grind and mix their own dry pigments with linseed oil inside their studios, in the 1840s, new innovations in pigments allowed paints to be premixed in tubes. Consequently , this new technology facilitated the practice of painting outdoors and was a crucial tool for impressionist painters, such as Monet, Cezanne, Renoir, and Cassatt.

Other connecting words that show cause and effect include therefore , so , and thus .

To Show Additional Support

When choosing a good trail bike, experts recommend 120–140 millimeters of suspension travel; that’s the amount that the frame or fork is able to flex or compress. Additionally , they recommend a 67–69 degree head-tube angle, as a steeper head-tube angle allows for faster turning and climbing.

Other connecting words that show additional support include also , besides, equally important , and in addition .

A Word of Caution

Single-word or short-phrase transitions can be helpful to signal a shift in ideas within a paragraph, rather than between paragraphs (see the discussion below about transitions between paragraphs). But it’s also important to understand that these types of transitions shouldn’t be frequent within a paragraph. As with anything else that happens in your writing, they should be used when they feel natural and feel like the right choice. Here are some examples to help you see the difference between transitions that feel like they occur naturally and transitions that seem forced and make the paragraph awkward to read:

Too Many Transitions: The Impressionist painters of the late 19th century are well known for their visible brush strokes, for their ability to convey a realistic sense of light, and for their everyday subjects portrayed in outdoor settings. In spite of this fact , many casual admirers of their work are unaware of the scientific innovations that made it possible this movement in art to take place. Then , In 1841, an American painter named John Rand invented the collapsible paint tube. To illustrate the importance of this invention , pigments previously had to be ground and mixed in a fairly complex process that made it difficult for artists to travel with them. For example , the mixtures were commonly stored in pieces of pig bladder to keep the paint from drying out. In addition , when working with their palettes, painters had to puncture the bladder, squeeze out some paint, and then mend the bladder again to keep the rest of the paint mixture from drying out. Thus , Rand’s collapsible tube freed the painters from these cumbersome and messy processes, allowing artists to be more mobile and to paint in the open air.

Subtle Transitions that Aid Reader Understanding : The Impressionist painters of the late 19th century are well known for their visible brush strokes, for their ability to convey a realistic sense of light, for their everyday subjects portrayed in outdoor settings. However , many casual admirers of their work are unaware of the scientific innovations that made it possible for this movement in art to take place. In 1841, an American painter named John Rand invented the collapsible paint tube. Before this invention , pigments had to be ground and mixed in a fairly complex process that made it difficult for artists to travel with them. The mixtures were commonly stored in pieces of pig bladder to keep the paint from drying out. When working with their palettes, painters had to puncture the bladder, squeeze out some paint, and then mend the bladder again to keep the rest of the paint mixture from drying out. Rand’s collapsible tube freed the painters from these cumbersome and messy processes, allowing artists to be more mobile and to paint in the open air.

Transitions between Paragraphs and Sections

It’s important to consider how to emphasize the relationships not just between sentences but also between paragraphs in your essay. Here are a few strategies to help you show your readers how the main ideas of your paragraphs relate to each other and also to your thesis.

Use Signposts

Signposts are words or phrases that indicate where you are in the process of organizing an idea; for example, signposts might indicate that you are introducing a new concept, that you are summarizing an idea, or that you are concluding your thoughts. Some of the most common signposts include words and phrases like first, then, next, finally, in sum , and in conclusion . Be careful not to overuse these types of transitions in your writing. Your readers will quickly find them tiring or too obvious. Instead, think of more creative ways to let your readers know where they are situated within the ideas presented in your essay. You might say, “The first problem with this practice is…” Or you might say, “The next thing to consider is…” Or you might say, “Some final thoughts about this topic are….”

Use Forward-Looking Sentences at the End of Paragraphs

Sometimes, as you conclude a paragraph, you might want to give your readers a hint about what’s coming next. For example, imagine that you’re writing an essay about the benefits of trees to the environment and you’ve just wrapped up a paragraph about how trees absorb pollutants and provide oxygen. You might conclude with a forward-looking sentence like this: “Trees benefits to local air quality are important, but surely they have more to offer our communities than clean air.” This might conclude a paragraph (or series of paragraphs) and then prepare your readers for additional paragraphs to come that cover the topics of trees’ shade value and ability to slow water evaporation on hot summer days. This transitional strategy can be tricky to employ smoothly. Make sure that the conclusion of your paragraph doesn’t sound like you’re leaving your readers hanging with the introduction of a completely new or unrelated topic.

Use Backward-Looking Sentences at the Beginning of Paragraphs

Rather than concluding a paragraph by looking forward, you might instead begin a paragraph by looking back. Continuing with the example above of an essay about the value of trees, let’s think about how we might begin a new paragraph or section by first taking a moment to look back. Maybe you just concluded a paragraph on the topic of trees’ ability to decrease soil erosion and you’re getting ready to talk about how they provide habitats for urban wildlife. Beginning the opening of a new paragraph or section of the essay with a backward-looking transition might look something like this: “While their benefits to soil and water conservation are great, the value that trees provide to our urban wildlife also cannot be overlooked.”

Evaluate Transitions for Predictability or Conspicuousness

Finally, the most important thing about transitions is that you don’t want them to become repetitive or too obvious. Reading your draft aloud is a great revision strategy for so many reasons, and revising your essay for transitions is no exception to this rule. If you read your essay aloud, you’re likely to hear the areas that sound choppy or abrupt. This can help you make note of areas where transitions need to be added. Repetition is another problem that can be easier to spot if you read your essay aloud. If you notice yourself using the same transitions over and over again, take time to find some alternatives. And if the transitions frequently stand out as you read aloud, you may want to see if you can find some subtler strategies.

Exercise: Try Out Some New Transition Strategies

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Figure \(\PageIndex{2}\)

Choose an essay or piece of writing, either that you’re currently working on, or that you’ve written in the past. Identify your major topics or main ideas. Then, using this chapter, develop at least three examples of sentence-level transitions and at least two examples of paragraph-level transitions. Share and discuss with your classmates in small groups, and choose one example of each type from your group to share with the whole class. If you like the results, you might use them to revise your writing. If not, try some other strategies.

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Transition signals

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What are transition signals?

Transition signals are linking words or phrases that connect your ideas and add cohesion to your writing. They signpost or indicate to the reader the relationships between sentences and between paragraphs, making it easier for the reader to understand your ideas. We use a variety of transition signals to fulfil a number of functions. Some of these functions include: to show the order or sequence of events; to indicate that a new idea or an example will follow; to show that a contrasting idea will be presented, or to signal a summary or a conclusion.

How are transition signals useful?

Transition signals will:

•     make it easier for the reader to follow your ideas.

•     create powerful links between sentences and paragraphs to improve the flow of information across the whole text. The result is that the writing is smoother.

•     help to carry over a thought from one sentence to another, from one idea to another or from one paragraph to another.

How are transition signals used?

•     Transition signals are usually placed at the start of sentences; however, they may also appear in the middle or end of sentences.

•     A transition signal, or the clause introduced by a transition signal, is usually separated from the rest of the sentence by commas.

•     You DO NOT need to use transition signals in every sentence in a paragraph; however, good use of transition words will help to make the relationship between the ideas in your writing clear and logical.

Which transition signals can I use?

Before choosing a particular transition signal to use, be sure you understand its meaning and usage completely and be sure that it's the right match for the logic in your paper. Transition signals all have different meanings, nuances, and connotations.

•     To introduce an example:

•     To introduce an opposite idea or show exception:

•     To show agreement:

•     To introduce an additional idea:

•     To indicate sequence or order, or logically divide an idea:

•     To indicate time:

•     To compare:

•     To contrast:

•     To show cause and effect:

•     To summarise or conclude:

The example below illustrates how transition signals can be used to improve the quality of a piece of writing. Note how the ideas flow more smoothly and the logical relationships between the ideas are expressed clearly.

At HELPS, we endeavour to support UTS students in a number of ways. First , we offer 15-minute ‘drop in’ sessions with a HELPS Advisor. Making an appointment for these sessions is not necessary. Here , students can gain assistance with their academic writing and presentation skills. Specifically , students may ask for assistance with: understanding an assignment question; understanding assessment criteria; clarifying an assignment type (e.g. what’s a literature review?); planning for an assignment; strategies for effective reading/note-taking skills; and obtaining information from self-study resources. During this time , the HELPS Advisor may refer students for a longer, 40-minute consultation. Students cannot, however , book one-to-one advice sessions online; only a HELPS Advisor can do that.

Getting one-to-one advice is an opportunity for an in-depth discussion with a HELPS Advisor in relation to your specific needs on an assessment. For example , you may require assistance preparing for an oral presentation. Alternatively , you may ask a HELPS Advisor to discuss a draft of an assignment to ensure that you have addressed the assessment criteria. While HELPS Advisors cannot edit your work, they can point out persistent errors in your text and show you how to correct these. In other words , they can help you to edit your own work. 

In brief , there are many ways that HELPS can support UTS students. Students are encouraged to drop by the HELPS office which is situated in Building 1, level 5, room 25.

The Learning Centre 2013, Transition signals in writing , UNSW, viewed 20 September 2013, < https://student.unsw.edu.au/transition-signals-writing >.

Unilearning 2000, Transition signals , UOW, viewed 20 September 2013, <The UniLearning website is no longer available>.

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essay with transition signals

Writing Studio

Common transition words and phrases.

In an effort to make our handouts more accessible, we have begun converting our PDF handouts to web pages. Download this page as a PDF: Transitions Return to Writing Studio Handouts

Transitions clarify the logic of your argument by orienting your reader as you develop ideas between sentences and paragraphs. These tools should alert readers to shifts in your argument while and also maintain the smoothness and clarity of your prose. Below, you’ll find some of the most commonly used transition categories and examples of each. Depending on the example, these suggestions may be within sentences or at the beginning of sentences.

Transitions by Category

1. addition.

Use when presenting multiple ideas that flow in the same direction, under the same heading/ idea also, another, finally, first, first of all, for one thing, furthermore, in addition, last of all, likewise, moreover, next, and, second, the third reason

2. Sequence/ Order

Use to suggest a temporal relationship between ideas; places evidence in sequence first, second (etc.), next, last, finally, first of all, concurrently, immediately, prior to, then, at that time, at this point, previously, subsequently, and then, at this time, thereafter, previously, soon, before, after, followed by, after that, next, before, after, meanwhile, formerly, finally, during

3. Contrast

Use to demonstrate differences between ideas or change in argument direction but, however, in contrast, on the other hand, on the contrary, yet, differ, difference, balanced against, differing from, variation, still, on the contrary, unlike, conversely, otherwise, on the other hand, however

4. Exception

Use to introduce an opposing idea however, whereas, on the other hand, while, instead, in spite of, yet, despite, still, nevertheless, even though, in contrast, but, but one could also say…

5. Comparison

Use to demonstrate similarities between ideas that may not be under the same subject heading or within the same paragraph like, likewise, just, in a different way / sense, whereas, like, equally, in like manner, by comparison, similar to, in the same way, alike, similarity, similarly, just as, as in a similar fashion, conversely

6. Illustration

Use to develop or clarify an idea, to introduce examples, or to show that the second idea is subordinate to the first for example, to illustrate, on this occasion, this can be seen, in this case, specifically, once, to illustrate, when/where, for instance, such as, to demonstrate, take the case of, in this case

7. Location

Use to show spatial relations next to, above, below, beneath, left, right, behind, in front, on top, within

8. Cause and Effect

Use to show that one idea causes, or results from, the idea that follows or precedes it because, therefore, so that, cause, reason, effect, thus, consequently, since, as a result, if…then, result in

9. Emphasis

Use to suggest that an idea is particularly important to your argument important to note, most of all, a significant factor, a primary concern, a key feature, remember that, pay particular attention to, a central issue, the most substantial issue, the main value, a major event, the chief factor, a distinctive quality, especially valuable, the chief outcome, a vital force, especially relevant, most noteworthy, the principal item, above all, should be noted

10. Summary or Conclusion

Use to signal that what follows is summarizing or concluding the previous ideas; in humanities papers, use these phrases sparingly. to summarize, in short, in brief, in sum, in summary, to sum up, in conclusion, to conclude, finally

Some material adapted from Cal Poly Pomona College Reading Skills Program and “ Power Tools for Technical Communication .” 

Writing Effective Sentence Transitions (Advanced)

Transitions are the rhetorical tools that clarify the logic of your argument by orienting your reader as you develop ideas between sentences and paragraphs. The ability to integrate sentence transitions into your prose, rather than simply throwing in overt transition signals like “in addition,” indicates your mastery of the material. (Note: The visibility of transitions may vary by discipline; consult with your professor to get a better sense of discipline or assignment specific expectations.)

Transition Signals

Transition signals are words or phrases that indicate the logic connecting sets of information or ideas. Signals like therefore, on the other hand, for example, because, then, and afterwards can be good transition tools at the sentence and paragraph level. When using these signals, be conscious of the real meaning of these terms; they should reflect the actual relationship between ideas.

Review Words

Review words are transition tools that link groups of sentences or whole paragraphs. They condense preceding discussion into a brief word or phrase. For example: You’ve just completed a detailed discussion about the greenhouse effect. To transition to the next topic, you could use review words like “this heat-trapping process” to refer back to the green house effect discussion. The relative ability to determine a cogent set of review words might signal your own understanding of your work; think of review words as super-short summaries of key ideas.

Preview words

Preview words condense an upcoming discussion into a brief word or phrase. For example: You’ve just explained how heat is trapped in the earth’s atmosphere. Transitioning to the theory that humans are adding to that effect, you could use preview words like “sources of additional CO2 in the atmosphere include” to point forward to that discussion.

Transition Sentences

The strongest and most sophisticated tools, transition sentences indicate the connection between the preceding and upcoming pieces of your argument. They often contain one or more of the above transition tools. For example: You’ve just discussed how much CO2 humans have added to the atmosphere. You need to transition to a discussion of the effects. A strong set of transition sentences between the two sections might sound like this:

“These large amounts of CO2 added to the atmosphere may lead to a number of disastrous consequences for residents of planet earth. The rise in global temperature that accompanies the extra CO2 can yield effects as varied as glacial melting and species extinction.”

In the first sentence, the review words are “These large amounts of CO2 added to the atmosphere”; the preview words are “number of disastrous consequences”; the transition signals are “may lead to.” The topic sentence of the next paragraph indicates the specific “disastrous consequences” you will discuss.

If you don’t see a way to write a logical, effective transition between sentences, ideas or paragraphs, this might indicate organizational problems in your essay; you might consider revising your work.

Some material adapted from Cal Poly Pomona College Reading Skills Program  and “ Power Tools for Technical Communication .”

Last revised: 07/2008 | Adapted for web delivery: 05/2021

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Transition words for essays

Transition words for essays

The right transition words can transform a mediocre essay into a great paper. In this post, we discuss why effective transitions can substantially improve the quality and readability of your essay and provide examples of commonly used transition words.

What are transitions?

Transitions are the places in your paper where you move on to a new idea or paragraph. They may also be points at which you want to add to, expand upon, or conclude a previous statement.

The best transitions are signaled clearly by keywords and phrases that let the reader know that you’re moving on. Transition words typically occur at the beginning of a sentence.

How do transition words improve your essay?

Quality transitions are often the difference between a decent essay and a strong one. Transition words give clear signals to the reader that you are moving on to a new idea and this enables them to more easily follow your argument.

When a reader can efficiently follow the main threads of your paper, then they are more likely to be persuaded by your argument, which is the point of papers like argumentative essays .

Types of transition words

The transition words that you use in your paper will naturally depend on what kind of transition you’re making. In this section, we break down the main types of transitions that you might use in your essay and provide examples of common transition words.

Adding a point

There may be multiple times throughout a paper where you want to add to a point that you made or that came from one of your sources. To signal this, you might use one of the following phrases:

  • additionally
  • furthermore
  • in addition

Elaborating on a point

At other times, you may need to expand, or elaborate upon, a previously stated idea. In that case, you may utilize one of these keywords:

  • by extension
  • in other words
  • put differently

Introducing examples

Sometimes you may want to introduce an example that illustrates a previous point. To introduce examples, you can use one of the following phrases:

  • for example
  • for instance
  • specifically
  • to take a case in point

Indicating comparisons and contrasts

Some types of essays, like position papers, require you to introduce contrasting points of view. In order to transition from one perspective to another, you may want to use a transition word or phrase that signals a comparison or contrast:

Comparison :

  • along the same lines
  • in the same way
  • in the same vein
  • by contrast
  • even though
  • in contrast
  • nevertheless
  • nonetheless
  • on the contrary
  • on the other hand

Showing cause and effect

If you’re building an argument and you want to indicate that one point is dependent on another, you might want to employ one of these phrases to signal that transition:

  • accordingly
  • as a result
  • consequently

When you are ready to conclude a point or prepare your reader for your paper’s conclusion, it’s important to signal that you’re at that stage. Consider using one of these transition words to do so:

  • in conclusion
  • to summarize

If you are transitioning between your own words and borrowed material from secondary sources, be sure to properly cite any ideas that aren’t your own. You can use the BibGuru citation generator to create instant, accurate citations for a range of source types, including books , articles , and websites .

Frequently Asked Questions about transition words for essays

Commonly used transition words include: additionally, although, as a result, for example, for instance, however, moreover, therefore, thus, and ultimately.

To link two points together, or to add to a previous point, you might use transition words like:

The most popular types of transitions are those that introduce examples or that add to, elaborate upon, compare or contrast, or conclude a previous point.

To signal a transition in an essay, use a transition word or phrase. Choose a phrase based on the kind of transition that you’re making.

Transition words give clear signals to the reader that you are moving on to a new idea and or that you want to add to, expand, or conclude a previous point. Transition words can also be used to introduce examples and to indicate a comparison or contrast.

Tips for integrating quotes into a research paper

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Writing Center

Loyola university chicago, transitions & signal words.

We use transitions in writing to connect ideas and signal to readers that we are moving through our discussion. Transitions help writers organize their papers and help readers understand how ideas and parts of the paper fit together. These transitions can occur Between Paragraphs and Between Sentences .

  Between Paragraphs

Each of your paragraphs should refer to a previous idea. In order to make sure the ideas flow logically, we use transitions between paragraphs to link ideas and show readers how the paragraphs are connected. Example phrases include:

  • While A suggests B, C suggests D.
  • After looking at A, we move to B.
  • In addition, C also argues D.

  Between Sentences

We use transitions between sentences to link ideas and help the sentences flow coherently.

Use transition words such as first , next , however , and in addition to show the relationships among sentences and ideas. Repeat key words or phrases to tie related sentences together:

The new black middle class came of age in the 1960s during an unprecedented American economic boom and in the hub of a thriving mass culture . The economic boom made luxury goods and convenient services available to large numbers of hard-working Americans for the first time. American mass culture presented models of the good life principally in terms of conspicuous consumption and hedonistic indulgence.

—Cornel West, Race Matters*

Use parallel phrases—phrases that begin with the same word or that share the same grammatical structure—to emphasize connections among similar examples or related pieces of information:

I spent my two days at Disneyland taking rides . I took a bobsled through the Matterhorn and a submarine under the Polar Ice Cap and a rocket jet to the Cosmic Vapor Curtain. I took Peter Pan’s Flight, Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride, Alice’s Scary Adventures, and Pinocchio’s Daring Journey. I took a steamboat and a jungle boat. I took the Big Thunder Mountain Railroad to Coyote Country and the Splash Mountain roller coaster to Critter Country. […] More precisely, those rides took me : up and down and around sudden corners and over rooftops, and all I had to do was sit back and let whatever conveyance I was sitting in do the driving.

—William Zinsser, American Places*

Common Transition Words and Phrases:

To Add: and, again, and then, besides, finally, further, too, in addition, moreover, as equally important, as well, also, furthermore, likewise, moreover, similarly, still, next

To Compare/Contrast: but, yet, on the other hand, however, nevertheless, on the contrary, by comparison, where, compared to, although, conversely, meanwhile, after all, in contrast, nonetheless, rather, instead

To Prove: because, for, since, for the same reason, furthermore, moreover, indeed, in fact, as a result, consequently, accordingly, thus

To Show Exception: yet, still, however, nevertheless, in spite of, despite, of course, aside from, barring, except, excluding, other than, save

To Show Time/Sequence: immediately, thereafter, soon, finally, then, later, previously, formerly, first (second, third, fourth, etc.), next, first of all, to begin with, in turn, meanwhile, afterward, in conclusion, following, subsequently, previously, simultaneously, concurrently, after, before, consequently, previously, hence

To Repeat/Summarize: as I have said, as I have noted, as I have shown, as a result, in brief, in short, finally, to summarize, therefore, after all, in any case, in other words, once again, consequently

To Emphasize: definitely, extremely, surprisingly, without a doubt, certainly, above all, chiefly, especially, particularly

To Give an Example: for example, for instance, to illustrate, in this situation, to demonstrate, in this case, in particular, namely, specifically, such as, including

To Generalize: as a rule, for the most part, generally speaking, usually

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Writing Transitions

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A discussion of transition strategies and specific transitional devices.

Good transitions can connect paragraphs and turn disconnected writing into a unified whole. Instead of treating paragraphs as separate ideas, transitions can help readers understand how paragraphs work together, reference one another, and build to a larger point. The key to producing good transitions is highlighting connections between corresponding paragraphs. By referencing in one paragraph the relevant material from previous paragraphs, writers can develop important points for their readers.

It is a good idea to continue one paragraph where another leaves off. (Instances where this is especially challenging may suggest that the paragraphs don't belong together at all.) Picking up key phrases from the previous paragraph and highlighting them in the next can create an obvious progression for readers. Many times, it only takes a few words to draw these connections. Instead of writing transitions that could connect any paragraph to any other paragraph, write a transition that could only connect one specific paragraph to another specific paragraph.

Essay Writing Guide

Transition Words For Essays

Last updated on: Dec 19, 2023

220 Best Transition Words for Essays

By: Nova A.

15 min read

Reviewed By: Jacklyn H.

Published on: Jul 9, 2019

Transition Words for Essays

Writing essays can be hard, and making sure your transitions are smooth is even harder. 

You've probably heard that good essays need good transitions, but what are they? How do you use them in your writing? Also, your essays are assessed according to particular criteria and it is your responsibility to ensure that it is being met.

But don't worry, we are here to help. This blog will give you transition words for essays, including how to choose the right ones and where to place them for maximum impact. Essay writing is a technical process that requires much more effort than simply pouring your thoughts on paper.

If you are new to the concept of transition words and phrases, deep dive into this article in order to find out the secret to improving your essays.

Transition Words for Essays

On this Page

What Are Transition Words 

Transition words are essential elements in essay writing that create smooth transitions between ideas. 

Think of a transition as a conjunction or a joining word. It helps create strong relationships between ideas, paragraphs, or sentences and assists the readers to understand the word phrases and sentences easily.

As writers, our goal is to communicate our thoughts and ideas in the most clear and logical manner. Especially when presenting complex ideas, we must ensure that they are being conveyed in the most understandable way.

To ensure that your paper is easy to understand, you can work on the sequencing of ideas. Break down your ideas into different sentences and paragraphs then use a transition word or phrase to guide them through these ideas.

Why Should You Use Transitions

The purpose of transition words goes beyond just connectivity. They create a cohesive narrative , allowing your ideas to flow seamlessly from one point to another. These words and phrases act as signposts and indicate relationships. 

These relations could include:

  • Cause and Effect
  • Comparison and Contrast
  • Addition and Emphasis
  • Sequence and Order
  • Illustration and Example
  • Concession and Contradiction
  • Summary and Conclusion

They form a bridge and tie sentences together, creating a logical connection. In addition to tying the entire paper together, they help demonstrate the writer’s agreement, disagreement, conclusion, or contrast.

However, keep in mind that just using or including transitional words isn’t enough to highlight relationships between ideas. The content of your paragraphs must support the relationship as well. So, you should avoid overusing them in a paper.

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Types of Transitions

Transitions in essays can be classified into different types based on the relationships they indicate between ideas. Each type serves a specific purpose in guiding readers through your arguments. 

Let's explore some common types of transitions and their examples:

Additive Transitions 

These transitions are used to add information or ideas. They help you expand on your points or provide additional supporting evidence. Examples:

  • In addition
  • Furthermore
  • Additionally
  • Not only... but also
  • Coupled with

Adversative Transitions

Adversative transitions show contrast or contradiction between ideas. They are used to present opposing viewpoints or highlight differences. Examples:

  • Nevertheless
  • On the other hand
  • In contrast

Causal Transitions

Causal transitions explain cause-and-effect relationships. They help you establish the reasons behind certain outcomes or actions. Examples:

  • As a result
  • Consequently
  • Resulting in
  • For this reason

Sequential Transitions

Sequential transitions indicate the order or sequence of events or ideas. They help you present your thoughts in a logical and organized manner. Examples: 

  • Subsequently
  • In the meantime
  • Simultaneously

Comparative Transitions

Comparative transitions highlight similarities or comparisons between ideas. They help you draw connections and illustrate relationships. Here are some transition words for essays examples: 

  • In the same way
  • Compared to
  • In comparison
  • Correspondingly
  • By the same token
  • Equally important
  • Analogous to

Getting started on your essay? Check out this insightful read on essay writing to make sure you ace it!

List of Good Transition Words for Essays

As mentioned above, there are different categories of transitions that serve a unique purpose. Understanding these different types will help you pick the most suitable word or phrase to communicate your message.

Here we have categorized the best transition words for essays so you can use them appropriately!

Transition Words for Argumentative Essays

In argumentative essays , the effective use of transition words is essential for presenting a well-structured and coherent argument. 

Transition Words for Compare and Contrast Essays

In compare and contrast essays , transition words play a crucial role in highlighting the similarities and differences between the subjects being compared. 

Here are a few transition words that are particularly useful in compare and contrast essays:

Transition Words for Cause and Effect Essays

In cause and effect essays , transition words help illustrate the relationships between causes and their corresponding effects. 

Here are a few transition words that are particularly useful in cause-and-effect essays:

Transition Words for Different Parts of Essays

Transition words are valuable tools that can be used throughout different parts of an essay to create a smooth and coherent flow. By understanding the appropriate transition words for each section, you can logically connect your ideas. 

Introduction Transition Words for Essays

Introductions are one of the most impactful parts of the essay. It's important that it connects logically with the rest of the essay. To do this, you can utilize different transition words for essays to start. Here are some starting transition words for essays:

Transition Words for Essays Body Paragraph

In an essay, body paragraphs play a crucial role in presenting and developing your ideas. To ensure a logical flow within each body paragraph, the strategic use of transition words is essential.

Here are lists of transitions for essays for different body paragraphs:

Transition Words for Essays for First Body Paragraph

Here is a list of transition words that you can use for the first body paragraph of an essay:

Transition Words for Essays Second Body Paragraph

Here is a list of transition words for the second body paragraph of an essay:

Transition Words for Essays Third Body Paragraph

Transition words for essays last body paragraph, transition words for essays conclusion .

Here is a list of ending transition words for essays:

Do’s and Don’ts of Using Essay Transitions

When it comes to using transitions in your essay, there are certain do's and don'ts that can help you effectively enhance the flow of your writing. Here are some key guidelines to keep in mind:

  • Add transitions only when introducing new ideas.
  • Go through the paper to make sure they make sense.
  • Start by creating an outline, so you know what ideas to share and how.
  • Use different transitions for each idea.
  • Don’t overuse them.
  • Don’t keep adding transitions in the same paragraph.
  • Don’t completely rely on transitions to signal relationships.
  • Don’t incorporate it into your content without understanding its usage.

By now, you have probably understood how transition words can save you from disjointed and directionless paragraphs. They are the missing piece that indicates how ideas are related to one another. You can also generate more essays with our AI powered essay writer to learn the art of transitioning smoothly from one paragraph to another. 

If you are still unable to distinguish transitions to open or conclude your essays, don’t be upset - these things require time and practice.

If you are looking for the perfect essay-writing service, get in touch with the expert writers at 5StarEssays.com. We will include the right transitions according to the type of paper, ensuring a coherent flow of ideas.

Just say ‘ write my essay ’ now and let our essay writer create quality content at the most pocket-friendly rates available.

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As a Digital Content Strategist, Nova Allison has eight years of experience in writing both technical and scientific content. With a focus on developing online content plans that engage audiences, Nova strives to write pieces that are not only informative but captivating as well.

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Home  / Blog  / Improve your Writing  / 5 Common Transition Signal Errors & How to Fix Them

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Five common transition signal errors and how to fix them

If you ever have the chance, google the band Modest Mouse and listen to their music. Just so that you can never do it again.

I bring this up because reading an essay where transition signals are used incorrectly is like being subjected to a lot of unpleasant noise. To recap, transition signals are words and phrases that, when used correctly, enhance the flow of an essay.  Read our post introducing some key types of transition signals here . In this article, we’ll learn how to tune our instruments and give a stellar performance that doesn’t hurt anyone’s ears, by learning what not to do.

Error #1: Using too many transition signals

As the expression goes, "too much of a good thing" (Christmas pudding, full moon dancing, etc.) can be negative. The same applies to transition signals. Some students get so excited about using them that they use more than necessary and this creates text that is choppy and confusing. Here is an example of this, plus a correction…

essay with transition signals

Luckily there are ways to avoid overusing transition signals, for instance:

  • Don't use two transition signals with similar meanings in the same sentence.
  • Don’t use too many short, simple sentences with transition signals; instead, combine simple ideas using fewer transition signals.
  • Ask yourself if the transition signal is necessary, or if it creates confusion in which you’re better off without it. For example:

The teacher encouraged students to rate how satisfied they were with the course. Therefore, the average rating was 8.5.

This doesn’t make sense as the second sentence implies that the average student rating was related to the teacher’s encouragement of students to rate the course. So, the transition signal is unnecessary.

The teacher encouraged students to rate how satisfied they were with the course. Therefore, The average rating was 8.5.

Error #2: Mixing up the order

I’ve found that students tend to muddle Cause & Effect transition signals (because, since, thus, due to, etc.), which state that one thing is the result of, or logically leads to, another thing. Perhaps this is because some Cause & Effect sentences can read a bit like the brainteaser: “Which came first? The chicken or the egg?” Most often though, the cause and the effect become clear if you read the sentence carefully. Take a look at this example…

essay with transition signals

The word “result” seems to resonate more with my students than “effect”, so if it helps to rather call them Cause & Result transition signals, go for it.

Follow these tips to avoid muddling the order when using transition signals:

  • Read the sentences carefully to establish the correct order. Ask yourself: which action/decision/belief came first?
  • Pay particular attention to transition signals where the two clauses/sentences are closely intertwined (a bit like Laurel and Hardy, or Antony and Cleopatra), including Cause & Effect and Comparison & Contrast transition signals (however, nonetheless, although, whereas, etc.).
  • Be careful with transition signal phrases that sound the same but can’t be used in the same way. For instance:

Incorrect: Overeating is a result of obesity. Correct: Obesity is a result of overeating. / Overeating results in obesity.

Incorrect: Respiratory problems can cause air pollution. Correct: Respiratory problems can be caused by air pollution. / Air pollution can cause respiratory problems.

Error # 3: Using incorrect grammar

No man is an island, and neither is a transition signal. Indeed, the purpose of transition signals is to link pieces of text (the clue is in the name – transition signal). Therefore, it’s important to give as much love to the sentences, clauses, and paragraphs that transition signals connect as the transition signals themselves. As an ESL teacher, I’ve found that students can have difficulty with getting this surrounding grammar right, as the below example shows:

essay with transition signals

It’s important to remember that different transition signals follow different grammatical rules. For example, transition signals like “although”, “though”, “even though”, and “whereas’” are classified as “subordinating conjunctions.” This is a fancy way of describing a word or phrase that adds more information about the big guy (or main clause).

It’s helpful to remember that because a subordinating conjunction’s job is to add information to the main clause, it means that these transition signals can never, ever, ever (just one more “ever” for good measure) stand alone. If they do, we have a grammatically dire situation called a “sentence fragment” (and all the king’s linguists raced frantically to put the broken words back together again).

A main clause can be distinguished from a dependent clause because it can stand independently. Study this example, which shows how our very helpful, neighbourly subordinating conjunction transition signals link main/independent and dependent clauses:

essay with transition signals

“Okay teacher,” I hear you thinking. “That’s easy because all the transition signals in the same category (Cause & Effect, Emphasis, Addition, etc.) must follow the same grammar, right?” Alas, no. It is better to learn the grammar for transition signals individually, rather than per category, since the category of the transition signal does not always determine its grammar .

Hence, we have Comparison & Contrast transition signals such as “in contrast” starting a new sentence, while others such as “however” that can act as subordinating clauses or start a new sentence. Other transition signal categories are similarly hodgepodge when it comes to grammatical rules. Not confusing at all!

To make things easier for yourself, memorise the two broad grammatical structures that transition signals fall under, namely: clause connectors (which include the subordinating conjunctions just mentioned), and sentence connectors.

As we have seen, clause connectors are used to connect two clauses to make one sentence – these connectors use a comma. Sentence connectors, on the other hand, connect two feistily independent, complete sentences using either a full stop or semi-colon, and are followed by a comma. Here are examples with transition signals that function as sentence connectors:

It is commonly accepted that children acquire languages with more ease than adults. Similarly, studies show that children have more musical talent than adults.

It is commonly accepted that children acquire languages with more ease than adults; nevertheless, adults should not be discouraged and instead embrace learning a new language. (“Nevertheless” can also connect two sentences with a full stop). It is commonly accepted that children acquire languages. Despite this, not all children are given the opportunity to realise their linguistic potential.

Error #5: Using variations of transition signals incorrectly

Some transition signals can change form, which can puzzle students. For example, “in spite of” can be used on its own, or with “whether”. On the other hand, “despite” can be used with “this”, “the fact that”, or with a gerund.

Whichever transition signal variation you choose, be aware that the surrounding grammar must change too, as can be seen here:

essay with transition signals

In conclusion, it is possible to avoid falling into transition signal manholes if you tread carefully and follow our expert tips.

By Leigh-Anne Hunter

For more ideas, and real life examples, see Master Transition Signals .

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A List of Transition Words to Use for Argumentative Essays

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Amanda Green was born in a small town in the west of Scotland, where everyone knows everyone. I joined the Toastmasters 15 years ago, and I served in nearly every office in the club since then. I love helping others gain confidence and skills they can apply in every day life.

Writing an argumentative essay requires a lot of effort aside from research. Besides grammar and structure, you definitely need to make sure your essay is coherent by using transitions.

Argumentative essay transition words allow you to wrap up a piece of evidence to support your main point and then move on to another. Keep reading for tips and an exhaustive list of transition words I put together for your argumentative essays.

What Is a Transition Word?

essay with transition signals

A transition word is critical to producing quality content. Also known as linking words, transition words make basic connections between sentences and paragraphs to show a relationship between ideas.

A strong transition is crucial when writing an essay. It’s not enough that you provide complete information about your main points and supporting details. You also have to make your argument attractive and logical by using transitions in your academic essay.

The absence of transition words will make your paper less readable and understandable. But too many transitions can also ruin your piece. Use them in moderation to avoid confusion about your document.

Function and Importance of Transitions

The goal of transition words is to convey ideas clearly and concisely to your readers. If you’re writing an argumentative paper, you want to make logical connections in your document to prove your central point.

Transitional phrases and words help you produce a logical flow from one sentence or paragraph to another. In other words, they introduce what the following information will be. Some transitions come in single words, while others come in complete phrases and sentences.

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There are many categories of transitions, including those that present counterarguments and others that build on your arguments. Be careful about using the wrong transition. Otherwise, you won’t achieve your goal of clarity and conciseness. Consider these examples.

  • “ For instance , an anonymous TikTok user reports having a shorter attention span because of its over-swiping feature.” (In this sentence, for instance is used to provide an example).
  • “ Here’s an exception to my previous point. ” (This entire sentence is a transition, showing a logical connection between the previous and following sentences).

Transition can also be a sentence to a paragraph long. I’ll show you an example.

Paragraph A: A point that supports co-sleeping as a parenting method.

Transition: Despite this, there are many reasons that prove co-sleeping leads to sleep-related accidents.

Paragraph B: Points that oppose co-sleeping.

Types of Transition Words

There are several types of transitions you can use for making high-quality essays.

Transition Between Paragraphs

A type of transition required for a well-written essay is one you can find between paragraphs. Once you’ve arranged each paragraph according to your outline, it’s important to start each with an effective transition. This word or phrase is usually present in the topic sentence of the body.

Some examples include however, similarly, and for example. But these transition expressions cannot be a single sentence long. The initial sentence of every paragraph should be clear and substantial instead of simply connecting ideas.

Transition Within Paragraphs

Creating a powerful transition within every paragraph of your academic papers avoids choppy sentences. It provides a sense of connection between complex ideas to help readers anticipate what is coming.

These are usually single words or short phrases like in addition, since, and if.

Transition Between Sections

The last type of transition phrases and sentences are those between sections. You’ll find them all over the entire paper to summarize the information. They can be restatements of arguments or a short closing sentence to ensure the flow of ideas.

What Is an Argumentative Essay?

It’s a type of essay that requires you to research a subject matter and establish a position for or against it.

Aside from researching and evaluating evidence, showing a relationship between sentences and sections is essential when writing a paper. This will allow you to wrap up an idea and then start another. You must cite different sources to support your point of view, then show counterarguments.

The entire essay should include an introduction, a conclusion, and at least three body paragraphs.

How Do You Start an Argumentative Essay?

Every type of paper starts with an introduction, which usually includes a hook, background, and thesis statement.

The common essay introduction piques the reader’s interest through a surprising statistic or an interesting question. Provide readers with a background of your entire content piece, then state your main argument in a clear sentence.

Transition expressions are not yet essential in this stage of essay writing. Focus on setting up your point and discussing how you will argue it throughout the paper.

Common Transitions for Argumentative Essay Writing

Take a look at this list of transitional words and phrases commonly used to make strong arguments.

  • Additionally
  • In addition
  • Not only… but also
  • In the same way
  • Comparatively
  • Furthermore
  • Equally important

Counterargument Transition Words

Here’s a transition word list for essays showing different sides of an argument.

  • While it is true that
  • Nevertheless
  • Despite this
  • On the other hand
  • Be that as it may
  • Even though
  • Although this may be true

Transition Words and Phrases for Comparing and Contrasting

Here’s a breakdown of transition words and phrases you can use when comparing and contrasting.

  • In spite of
  • On the contrary
  • Different from
  • In contrast

Transition Words to Include in Your College Essay

Here are some examples of transition words you can use when applying for college admission or scholarship.

  • To put it in another way
  • To demonstrate
  • As an illustration
  • By all means
  • In other words

Transition Words for Cause and Effect

Consider this transition word list when showing cause and effect.

  • As a result
  • For this reason
  • Consequently
  • Accordingly
  • Under those circumstances
  • Because the

Transition Words for Essay Paragraphs

  • At the present time
  • In due time
  • To begin with
  • All of a sudden
  • Immediately
  • In a moment

Transitions to Emphasize a Point

  • Most of all
  • The main problem/issue is
  • Without question
  • More importantly
  • Most important of all

Transition Words for Additional Support or Evidence

Transition words for sequence or order, transition words for space or place.

  • In the middle of
  • In the distance
  • In the background
  • Here and there
  • On the side

To Cite a Source or Paraphrase

  • According to
  • This means that
  • Put it more simply

Transition Words to Begin a Body Paragraph

  • What is more
  • Beyond that

Transition Words to Introduce Details

  • For example
  • As an example
  • For instance
  • A case in point
  • Specifically
  • In particular
  • More specifically

Transition Words for Conclusion

  • As can be seen
  • By and large
  • On the whole
  • To summarize
  • In the final analysis
  • Generally speaking

More Transition Words

  • With this intention
  • In order to
  • In the hope that
  • With this in mind
  • For the purpose of
  • Provided that

Tips for Using Argumentative Essay Transitions

essay with transition signals

Follow these tips to improve your use of transitions in your essay.

Know What the Transitions Mean

Non-native speakers may need help knowing the meaning of every transition expression, so research every term before using it.

There are also many categories of transition words. You can use them to summarize points, show contradictions, express sequence, or begin a paragraph.

Start Your Essay with an Outline

Writing an outline will make it easier to map your ideas and move them around. This strategy will help you transition between paragraphs.

Don’t Overuse Transitions

The last mistake you shouldn’t make is overuse. Instead of making connections between sentences, you’ll make your paper more difficult to read. It creates more incoherence and distraction in your writing, contradicting its intended purpose in your paper.

Use Transition Words Properly

Now you know how to use transition words and phrases for your argumentative essay through this guide and list. These expressions will help you produce a coherent relationship between every idea.

Mastering transitions for your essay may not be a piece of cake, but practice makes perfect. Don’t forget to revise and proofread your argumentative before submitting it to your professor.

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Essay Writing Guide

Transition Words For Essays

Nova A.

Transition Words For Essays - The Ultimate List

11 min read

Published on: Oct 30, 2017

Last updated on: Dec 30, 2023

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Do you find it challenging to make your essays flow smoothly and hold your readers' attention from start to finish? Are your paragraphs disjointed, leaving your writing feeling unpolished?

It can be frustrating when your ideas don't connect seamlessly. You might wonder how to make your writing shine and ensure it leaves a lasting impression on your professors.

Don't worry; we've got you covered! 

In this guide, we'll introduce you to transition words for essays. These words are your secret weapon for crafting well-structured, compelling essays that will impress your teachers and elevate your writing game.  Let's get started!

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What are Good Transition Words for Essays?

Transition words are essential tools in essay writing , providing a clear path for your readers to follow. They serve the crucial purpose of connecting words, phrases, sentences, or even entire paragraphs. 

By using these transitions effectively, you can effortlessly convey your ideas and thoughts in a coherent and easily understandable manner.

However, it's crucial to exercise moderation when using transition words. Overusing them can clutter your essay, making it confusing and difficult to read. 

On the other hand, omitting them entirely can result in a piece that lacks flow and direction. Striking the right balance ensures that your essay is both engaging and comprehensible.

Purpose of Transition Words

Let’s take a look at the purpose of using transitions in essays:

  • Enhance Readability: Transition words improve the overall flow and coherence of your writing.
  • Clarify Relationships: They signal connections between ideas, whether it's adding, contrasting, or summarizing.
  • Improve Comprehension: Readers can follow your argument or narrative more easily.
  • Smooth Transitions: They act as bridges, seamlessly guiding your audience from one point to the next.
  • Manage Change: They prepare the reader for shifts in topic or perspective.
  • Enhance Engagement: Well-placed transitions keep readers interested and invested in your content.
  • Encourage Flow: They maintain a logical progression, aiding in the overall structure of your work.

Examples of Different Types of Transition Words

Here are some common types of transitions for essays that can be used in almost any situation. 

Addition Transitions

  • Furthermore
  • Additionally
  • In addition
  • Not only...but also

Comparison Transitions

  • In the same way
  • Comparable to
  • Correspondingly
  • In comparison
  • By the same token

Contrast Transitions

  • On the other hand
  • In contrast
  • Nevertheless
  • Nonetheless
  • Even though

Cause and Effect Transitions

  • Consequently
  • As a result
  • For this reason
  • Accordingly

Time Transitions

  • Simultaneously
  • In the meantime
  • Subsequently
  • At the same time

Illustration Transitions

  • For example
  • For instance
  • Specifically
  • To illustrate
  • In particular
  • In this case
  • As an illustration

Emphasis Transitions

  • Undoubtedly
  • Without a doubt

Summary Transitions 

  • To summarize
  • To conclude

Sequence Transitions

Example transitions.

  • As an example
  • To demonstrate
  • For one thing
  • As evidence
  • As an instance

For Showing Exception

  • At The Same Time 
  • Nevertheless  
  • On The Other Hand 
  • But At The Same Time 
  • Conversely 

For Proving

  • For This Reason 
  • Certainly 
  • To Demonstrate
  • In Fact 
  • Clearly 
  • As A Result

This transition words for essays list will make it easier for you to understand what words to use in which kind of essay or for which purpose. 

  Transition Words for Argumentative Essays

  • To begin with
  • By contrast
  • One alternative is
  • To put more simply
  • On the contrary
  • With this in mind
  • All things considered
  • Generally speaking
  • That is to say
  • Yet another

Transition Words for Persuasive Essays

  • furthermore 
  • Moreover 
  • Because 
  • Besides that
  • Pursuing this further 

Transition Words for Essays PDF

Transition Words for Compare and Contrast Essays

  • Althoughyhtjyjum,u
  • Notwithstanding

Transition Words for Informative Essays

  •  After all
  • As can be expected
  • Obviously 

Transition Words for Expository Essays

  • Equally important
  • Another reason
  • Not long after that
  • Looking back

Transition Words for Cause and Effect Essays

  • In order to
  • Provided that
  • Because of this

Transition Words for Synthesis Essays

  • As noted earlier
  • Consequently 
  • Whereas 
  • This leads to 
  • Another factor 
  • This lead to 
  • The underlying concept 
  • In this respect 

Transition Words for Analysis Essays

  • (once) again 
  • Primarily 
  • Due to 
  • Accordingly 
  • That is to say 
  • Subsequently 
  • To demonstrate 
  • However 

Conclusion Transition Words for Essays

  • In any event
  • As mentioned
  • In other words
  • As you can see

Beginning Transition Words for Essays

These are some introduction transition words for essays to start writing: 

  • In the first place
  • First of all
  • For the most part
  • On one hand
  • As a rule 

Paragraph Transition Words for Essays

  • To put it differently
  • Once and for all

Transition Words for Essay’s First Body Paragraph

  • To start with
  • First and foremost
  • In the beginning

Transition Words for Essay’s Second Body Paragraph 

  • In addition to this 
  • Furthermore 

Transition Words for Essay’s Last Body Paragraph

  • In conclusion
  • Finally 
  • Last but not least 
  • To sum up 
  • Altogether 

Transition Words for Quotes in Essays

  • Acknowledges

Transition Words for Essays Middle School

  • In conclusion 
  • For instance 

Transition Words for Essays High School

  • Today 
  • In addition 
  • To summarize 
  • On the other hand 
  • As well as 
  • Although 

Transition Words for Essays College

Here are some college level transition words for essay:

  • Pursuing this
  • Similarly 
  • What’s more 
  • As much as 
  • In a like manner
  • In the same fashion

Do’s and Don’ts of Using Transition Words

So, now you have some strong transition words for essays at hand. But how do you use these transition words? 

Here are the basic dos and don’ts of using transition words for essays. 

  • Understand that these terms are an important part of any type of essay or paper, adding to its overall flow and readability. 
  • Use these words when you are presenting a new idea. For example, start a new paragraph with these phrases, followed by a comma. 
  • Do not overuse transition words. It is one of the most common essay writing problems that students end up with. It is important to only use those words required to convey your message clearly. It is good to sound smart by using these words but don’t overdo it. 
  • Avoid using these words at the start and in the middle. Always try to use transition words only a few times where it is necessary to make it easy for the readers to follow the ideas.

So, now you have an extensive list of transition words. These are some of the best transition words for essays that you can add to your essays.

If your essay seems redundant because you used similar transition words, you can always have a look at this list to find some good replacements. 

So, whenever you’re writing an essay, refer back to this list and let your words flow!

If you still feel that your essay is not properly conveying your ideas, turn to our expert essay writers at MyPerfectWords.com.

If you have some write-up, our essay writing service will make it flow without changing the entire content. Or, if you wish to have an essay from scratch, we will write a paper for you!

Simply contact us and place your order now. Our writers will take care of everything to help you ace your assignment. 

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Transition Signals Definition and Examples

Transition Signals Definition and Examples

Transition Signals Examples – When you write an essay, you need to use several transition signals to make your writing even more interesting and reliable. These transition signals examples can be supporting sentences for the statements you write in your essay.

Table of Contents

Transition Signals Examples

There are 3 types of signal transitions you can use to give examples to support your statement:

  • for example
  • for instances

Now you know some transition signals examples, but how do you use them in your essay/writing?

How to Use Transition Signals

Use the words “ for example ” and “ for instance ” when the example you are about to write is a complete sentence. Both of these transition signals have the same meaning. They can be placed at the beginning of the sentence and followed by a comma (,).

For example, visitors can watch sea turtles come ashore to lay their eggs in the sand in Tortuguero National Park. For instance , people who are in poorer health in the first place may spend more time sitting down than walking around.

Use the words “ such as “, “ for example “, and “ for instance ” in the middle of a sentence when the example you are about to write is a noun or a list of nouns that are at the end of the sentence.

Things to note about pattern 2:

a. Give a comma (,) before the word “ such as “

In Costa Rica, visitors can see some rare birds , such as  quetzals and toucans.

b. Give a comma (,) before and after the word “ for example ” and “ for instance “

In Puerto Rico, visitors can see some rare birds , for example, quetzals and toucans. In Puerto Rico, visitors can see some rare birds , for instance, quetzals and toucans.

Be careful when you use the words “ for example ” and “ for instance ” in a sentence. Make sure the sentence you will write is in accordance with the Pattern 1 or Pattern 2 that we told you before.

Transition Signals Worksheet

Add commas to the following sentences!

  • Denmark has many attractions for children such as Tivoli Gardens and Legoland.
  • Dubai is famous for its new beautiful gardens. For example the Magical Garden is known all over the world.
  • There is a mix of architecture in Sao Paulo. Traditional architecture can be found in some buildings for example the Martinelli Building and Banco do Estado de Sao Paulo.
  • In Sao Paulo, there are also many modern buildings for instance Conjunto Nacional and the Banco Sumitomo are very modern in design.
  • Bolivia offers tourists many interesting places to visit for instance the capital city of La Paz and the islands in Lake Titicaca.
  • Denmark has many attractions for children ,  such as Tivoli Gardens and Legoland.
  • Dubai is famous for its new beautiful gardens. For example ,  the Magical Garden is known all over the world.
  • There is a mix of architecture in Sao Paulo. Traditional architecture can be found in some buildings ,  for example ,  the Martinelli Building and Banco do Estado de Sao Paulo.
  • In Sao paulo, there are also many modern buildings, for instance ,  Conjunto Nacional and the Banco Sumitomo are very modern in design.
  • Bolivia offers tourists many interesting places to visit ,  for instance ,  the capital city of La Paz and the islands in Lake Titicaca.

Okay, that was the complete explanation of transition signals definition, examples, and worksheet with answers. We hope this helps you in order to learn more about transition signals examples. Thanks.

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The Use of Transitional Signals in Essay Writing by EFL Students

Profile image of International Journal of English Language  and Translation Studies

2019, International Journal of English Language & Translation Studies

Transitional signals are very important in writing essays. Therefore, this research aimed to find out the types of transitional signals and their accuracy in sentences. The research used a descriptive quantitative method. There were 68 students taken randomly from the population. The instrument used to collect data was a writing test. The transitional signals analyzed were transitional signals for adding ideas and emphasizing, showing contrast and comparison, showing cause and effect, providing examples, introducing sequence, and summarizing. The findings of this research showed that the total of transitional signals used by the students were 203 transitional signals. More detailed for each type from the first until the sixth type were 35, 32, 17, 5, 95, and 19. Moreover, the percentage of the accuracy was 83%. The orders from the first until the sixth types of transitional signals were 86% adding ideas, 78% emphasizing, 94% showing contrast and comparison, 80% showing cause and effect, 84% providing examples, and 69% introducing time order or sequence, and summarizing. In other words, the most widely used transitional signal was transitional signals for introducing time order and sequence while the highest percentage of accuracy was transitional signals for providing examples.

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For foreign language learners, especially in university, academic writing is essential. Students are required to analyse, compare, and inform through academic writing. Moreover, when they reach the end of their study, they should write a thesis as part of a requirement to graduate. Thus, thesis writing is a major challenge for students. Halliday and Hassan as cited in Hinkel (2001) emphasise that academic writing should achieve cohesiveness to make it well-constructed and understandable. Transition signal is one of prominent cohesive devices that should be taken into account in academic writing. This study aims to identify students' problems and tendency in using transition signals in academic writing. The data are gained from university students' academic writing product which is built in a form of corpus. The data are then analysed by using corpus software (ant conc.3.2.4). Its implication on English Language Teaching (ELT) concerning the teaching of transition signals will also be addressed.

essay with transition signals

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This research is aimed to identify the types of transition signals used in discussion texts written by the sixth semester students of the English Study Program of UNDANA in academic year 2016/2017, to classify the types of transition signals which are mostly used by students and to analyze the appropriateness of the use of those transition signals in students' discussion texts. The researcher used descriptive qualitative method in conducting this research and the instrument used in collecting the data was the writing discussion text test. The subjects are forty eight students of the sixth semester of English Study Program of UNDANA in academic year 2016/2017. The result of the data analysis revealed that first, students are used all types of transition signals proposed by Oshima and Hogue. From all of the types, addition is the type of transition signals mostly used by students. Generally, students have good competence in using transition signal appropriate with its function and grammar, however, some transition signals are still used incorrectly.

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This research investigates Indonesian EFL students writing four types of English sentences in their paragraph writing assignments that were posted online in Writing 1 course of English Education at STKIP PGRI Sumatera Barat. The analysed types of sentences are Simple Sentence (code: S.S.), Compound Sentence (code: C.S.1), Complex Sentence (code: C.S.2), and Compound-Complex Sentence (code: C.C.S). The percentage of each type of sentences that appears in the students’ writings within each five genres represents the students’ syntactical composition. Moreover, this research focuses on quantitatively analysing the above five types of sentences that appeared in students’ assignments in each type of following genres: argumentative, descriptive, process, cause-effect, and comparison-contrast. Data are taken from 10% samples of all population. The finding shows that writing Simple Sentence in paragraphs is a common type of sentence that is used by the students. It indicates that the guidin...

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This study was intended to see what types of discourse markers found in essay writing made by of the fifth semester students of English Department of Kutai Kartanegara University in academic years 2013/2014. The subject of the study was 52 students of the fifth semester students of English Department. This study used an essay test to identify the types of discourse markers used in essay writing. A model of analysis consisting of three concurrent flows of activities: data reduction, data display and conclusion drawing/verification was used to analyze the data. The analysis of the data discovered that the types of discourse markers found in essay writing of the fifth semester students of English Education Department University of Kutai Kartanegara in academic years 2013/2014 were: discourse marker of connectives i.e. and and but, discourse marker of cause and result, namely: because and so, and discourse marker of temporal, i.e. then.

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There is an assumption that the writing ability of the forth semester students have been improved because the students have learned about how to develop paragraph in writing I, writing II, and writing III subject, so they are expected able to develop an essay. The purposes of the study are to describe the organization of the essay developed by the students of Widyagama University and to know the grammar problems found in the sentences of the essay developed by the students of Widyagama University. Based on finding and discussion of the research, the researcher concludes that the organization of the essays that developed by the research subjects is poor. Only one essay has a complete organization. The developing paragraph of each essay is also poor. Most of the paragraphs don't have concluding sentence. Generally, the essays had covered four types of the sentences; simple sentence, compound sentence, complex sentence, and compound-complex sentence. However, the essays are dominated by only one type of sentences, simple sentence. The grammar problems that found are fragment sentence, the errors of subject-verb agreement, and the errors in using coordinating conjunction.

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33 Transition Words and Phrases

Transitional terms give writers the opportunity to prepare readers for a new idea, connecting the previous sentence to the next one.

Many transitional words are nearly synonymous: words that broadly indicate that “this follows logically from the preceding” include accordingly, therefore, and consequently . Words that mean “in addition to” include moreover, besides, and further . Words that mean “contrary to what was just stated” include however, nevertheless , and nonetheless .

as a result : THEREFORE : CONSEQUENTLY

The executive’s flight was delayed and they accordingly arrived late.

in or by way of addition : FURTHERMORE

The mountain has many marked hiking trails; additionally, there are several unmarked trails that lead to the summit.

at a later or succeeding time : SUBSEQUENTLY, THEREAFTER

Afterward, she got a promotion.

even though : ALTHOUGH

She appeared as a guest star on the show, albeit briefly.

in spite of the fact that : even though —used when making a statement that differs from or contrasts with a statement you have just made

They are good friends, although they don't see each other very often.

in addition to what has been said : MOREOVER, FURTHERMORE

I can't go, and besides, I wouldn't go if I could.

as a result : in view of the foregoing : ACCORDINGLY

The words are often confused and are consequently misused.

in a contrasting or opposite way —used to introduce a statement that contrasts with a previous statement or presents a differing interpretation or possibility

Large objects appear to be closer. Conversely, small objects seem farther away.

used to introduce a statement that is somehow different from what has just been said

These problems are not as bad as they were. Even so, there is much more work to be done.

used as a stronger way to say "though" or "although"

I'm planning to go even though it may rain.

in addition : MOREOVER

I had some money to invest, and, further, I realized that the risk was small.

in addition to what precedes : BESIDES —used to introduce a statement that supports or adds to a previous statement

These findings seem plausible. Furthermore, several studies have confirmed them.

because of a preceding fact or premise : for this reason : THEREFORE

He was a newcomer and hence had no close friends here.

from this point on : starting now

She announced that henceforth she would be running the company.

in spite of that : on the other hand —used when you are saying something that is different from or contrasts with a previous statement

I'd like to go; however, I'd better not.

as something more : BESIDES —used for adding information to a statement

The city has the largest population in the country and in addition is a major shipping port.

all things considered : as a matter of fact —used when making a statement that adds to or strengthens a previous statement

He likes to have things his own way; indeed, he can be very stubborn.

for fear that —often used after an expression denoting fear or apprehension

He was concerned lest anyone think that he was guilty.

in addition : ALSO —often used to introduce a statement that adds to and is related to a previous statement

She is an acclaimed painter who is likewise a sculptor.

at or during the same time : in the meantime

You can set the table. Meanwhile, I'll start making dinner.

BESIDES, FURTHER : in addition to what has been said —used to introduce a statement that supports or adds to a previous statement

It probably wouldn't work. Moreover, it would be very expensive to try it.

in spite of that : HOWEVER

It was a predictable, but nevertheless funny, story.

in spite of what has just been said : NEVERTHELESS

The hike was difficult, but fun nonetheless.

without being prevented by (something) : despite—used to say that something happens or is true even though there is something that might prevent it from happening or being true

Notwithstanding their youth and inexperience, the team won the championship.

if not : or else

Finish your dinner. Otherwise, you won't get any dessert.

more correctly speaking —used to introduce a statement that corrects what you have just said

We can take the car, or rather, the van.

in spite of that —used to say that something happens or is true even though there is something that might prevent it from happening or being true

I tried again and still I failed.

by that : by that means

He signed the contract, thereby forfeiting his right to the property.

for that reason : because of that

This tablet is thin and light and therefore very convenient to carry around.

immediately after that

The committee reviewed the documents and thereupon decided to accept the proposal.

because of this or that : HENCE, CONSEQUENTLY

This detergent is highly concentrated and thus you will need to dilute it.

while on the contrary —used to make a statement that describes how two people, groups, etc., are different

Some of these species have flourished, whereas others have struggled.

NEVERTHELESS, HOWEVER —used to introduce a statement that adds something to a previous statement and usually contrasts with it in some way

It was pouring rain out, yet his clothes didn’t seem very wet.

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essay with transition signals

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Steps to writing an essay: the complete guide, sponsored post.

  • February 22, 2024

Starting an essay writing journey may look scary at first, but don’t worry! When approached correctly and following a clear map, anyone can come up with a strong essay. This guide will help you to understand how to write an essay by breaking down the steps for writing an essay, and thus you will have a complete comprehension of the whole process. No matter if you are working on argumentative, persuasive, informative, or narrative essays, these steps on writing an essay will act as a good set of instructions to show you the way through the world of essay writing.

First 5 steps of writing an essay

1. Understanding the essay type: To begin the writing process, first, you will have to identify the type of an essay you are working on. What is its type? There are specific features and demands for each type. For instance, an argumentative essay needs a clear standpoint on a particular issue, while narrative essay comprises story telling. Spend some time musing over the core of your essay so that you will have an easier time writing.

2. Brainstorming and research: Once you have determined the essay type you are expected to write, make sure you do proper brainstorming and get all the necessary data. Put down the main arguments and explanations you wish to include in your essay. Do thorough research to guarantee the information is based on reliable sources. If you struggle to research information, ask for help at EssayHave. It’s an essay writing service which can help you with research.

3. Creating an outline: A good essay should be supported by a proper outline. Break down your essay into three main parts: The introduction, body, and conclusion. The introduction lists the main points, the body paragraphs are subtitled with the main arguments and the conclusion summarizes the main arguments and leaves a lasting impression. An outline makes your essay coherent and arranged in a certain chain of sequence.

4. Crafting a strong introduction: The introductory paragraph of your essay is its voice and it is what attracts the reader. First of all include a hook – interesting fact, challenging question, or good quote. Ensure that your thesis is clearly defined in your essay; it should lay down the central idea. Briefly introduce what readers will get and see to it that your intro is not long but still creative.

5. Developing the body: The body of your essay is the major component where you put forth and support your key issues in English studies. Every paragraph must have a main idea and certain. Lay out your arguments in simple and plain language, the connecting between paragraphs is also needed to be smooth. If you are writing an argumentative essay, one thing to think about is the counterarguments to build your position.

Tips on how to make an outstanding essay

Now that we’ve covered the initial steps to writing an essay, let’s explore some tips to elevate your essay writing skills:

  • Be clear and concise: Eliminate extraneous complexity from your writing. Your ideas, thus, argue eloquently. Make every word matter, and cut out any extraneous details that don’t support your essay’s main point.
  • Tailor your writing style to the essay type: Different kinds of essays demand different writing approaches. The tone of an argumentative essay must be strong and assertive whereas a narrative essay is more open and personal. Your writing style should conform to the objective of your essay.
  • Create a captivating thesis statement: Your thesis should capture your essay’s main idea in no more than one sentence. This is your reader’s compass as it points them to the central argument of your paper. Formalize a thesis statement which is precise, not too long, and impressive.
  • Revise and edit: Revise and edit your essay when you are done with the first draft. Check for grammatical errors, clarity of expression, and overall coherence. Think of asking fellow students or professors for their useful suggestions in the refinement process.

Refining your writing with style and clarity

An ideal essay is not just a matter of following the steps asked but is about having your own voice in the piece of writing and making it appeal to your reader with ease. Here’s how you can refine your essay to make it truly stand out:It is predicted.

unchecked

Final essay writing steps

6. Writing an engaging conclusion: Here the conclusion is the final chance to make a deep impact in the minds of the readers. In conclusion, and synthesis of the central idea of discussion, the thesis should be restated in a new light. Do not introduce some new information in the conclusion and let your readers think about it.

7. Proofreading: Before you hand in your essay, make a complete proofreading. Check for spelling and grammar mistakes, make your writing style consistent, and make sure that you have followed your teacher’s instructions. A well-reflected essay is a sign of your commitment to quality research.

8. Seeking feedback: In the essay writing steps, try to ask for feedback in the form of your peers, friends, and teachers. New angles can provide a different viewpoint and identify areas of deficiency. Criticism is supposed to help a writer grow and develop, and that is an integral aspect of the writing process.

Summing up!

Having mastered the segments of writing a great essay is an invaluable ability that sets the course open for competent communication and self-expression. No matter what type of essay you have to write, whether argumentative, persuasive, informative, or narrative, if you follow these steps of writing an essay and apply the tips provided, you will get a good essay. Practice makes perfect, so you should not be afraid of trying different types of essays and developing your techniques with time. Happy writing!

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Jane Coaston

A More Conservative Case for How to Get More Americans to Marry

An illustration of a person wearing glasses and a suit against a backdrop of wedding bands.

By Jane Coaston

Ms. Coaston is a contributing writer to Opinion.

As of 2021, around 25 percent of 40-year-old Americans are not married — the highest percentage ever recorded. While divorce rates have plummeted from their early 1980s high, fewer people are choosing to marry in the first place. Why?

Yes, around two million Americans get married every year (and you probably have the save-the-dates on your refrigerator door to prove it). But a rising number of people aren’t, even people in long-term partnered relationships. They aren’t getting married for any number of reasons, whether that’s distrust of the institution of marriage or the potential loss of access to federal benefits or a belief that marriage just doesn’t fit their needs. But in his new book, “Get Married: Why Americans Must Defy the Elites, Forge Strong Families, and Save Civilization,” the University of Virginia professor Brad Wilcox argues that marriage is more important than ever for individuals and for the country.

I spoke with Mr. Wilcox about getting married, staying married and whether the government should help individuals find partners. This interview has been edited for length and clarity and is part of an Opinion Q. and A. series exploring modern conservatism today, its influence in society and politics and how and why it differs (and doesn’t) from the conservative movement that most Americans thought they knew.

Jane Coaston: Why don’t more people get married now, in your opinion? How did we get to this point where, as you write, we are seeing the “closing of the American heart”?

Brad Wilcox: Part of the story here is the emergence of what I call a Midas mind-set, where too many Americans, too many young adults especially, are either explicitly or implicitly assuming that life is about education, money and especially work. One Pew study found that for Americans in general, 71 percent thought having a job or career they enjoy is the path toward fulfillment, and getting married was the path for only 23 percent. We’ve also seen the falling fortunes of men, especially men who don’t have college degrees. They’re much less connected to the work force and they’re less attractive for that reason in part.

About one in four men in their prime, 25 to 54, are not working, and those men are less likely to get married in the first place and more likely to get divorced if they do marry. We could talk about how the rise of expressive individualism since the late ’60s and early ’70s has kind of changed what Americans expect from love and marriage and made them less formalistic in their orientation. Finally, there’s growing secularization and the ways in which public policies often end up penalizing marriage today, particularly among the working class. So it’s a perfect storm of cultural policy and economic developments that have made marriage less important for some and less accessible for others. And that’s why we’re seeing fewer and fewer Americans opening their hearts to marriage today.

[ Last month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported about 16 percent of the entire 25-to-54 male population is unemployed, but the labor force participation for men without college degrees is regularly lower than their counterparts with degrees. ]

Coaston: Many people would agree with you about the importance of marriage, but they’d argue that’s why they aren’t doing it. They take marriage too seriously and they don’t want to commit too early, or they don’t think that they are the right people to get married.

Wilcox: I think that’s a great point. I think one of the challenges facing all of us is that our culture, our pop culture in some ways especially, will often give us what I call the soul-mate myth. And it’s this idea that there’s some perfect person out there waiting for you, and that once you find them and love them and then marry them, you’ll have this perfect connection that engenders intense emotional connection, sense of romance, passion that in turn leads you to be happy and fulfilled most of the time. I think there’s a kind of naïveté that we have around the soul-mate myth, rather than recognizing that we’re all flawed.

Any kind of serious relationship, including marriage, is going to be at times deeply challenging and hard and require a lot of work. So I think kind of having a more realistic understanding of the way that love and marriage tend to work out for most of us would be helpful in reducing the expectations and making people more realistic about it. Having a list of, in a sense, four or five non-negotiables for a potential spouse, but not a list that extends to 20 items.

Of course not everyone should get married or obviously can get married today and I don’t want to lose sight of that. In terms of this broader discussion, though, it looks like a large share of young adults today will never marry.

Coaston: How do you respond to people who argue that amid all of this conversation about the importance of marriage, a bad marriage could be damaging for children?

Wilcox: It’s important to acknowledge that there’s a good bit of research that high-conflict marriages are bad for children. We’re talking about things like domestic violence, regular screaming, fights in the kitchen, whatever it might be. Psychologists and family scholars have ways of measuring how much conflict there is between parents and then again, in different sets of research, they find that high-conflict marriages are bad for kids. But what they find is that when divorce happens in lower-conflict situations for married parents, that ends up being bad for kids because it’s associated with having to sell your house and split your household between two different properties.

[ Mr. Wilcox pointed to research done by Paul Amato and Alan Booth. In one paper with Laura Spencer Loomis, for instance, the researchers found, based on a longitudinal study conducted in the 1980s and early ’90s, worse outcomes for the children of high-conflict marriages in which the parents remained married and did not divorce, and for the children of low-conflict marriages that ended in divorce.]

There’s the emotional difficulties and trauma associated with divorce for kids — different routines, different households, different expectations now between the two sets of parents. This also sends kids a signal that they can have less faith in love and marriage because from their perspective, their parents might’ve seemed reasonably OK and then they’ve broken off their marriage.

Maybe one parent is depressed, maybe one parent feels like they’re growing apart from their spouse, maybe they’re experiencing some kind of sexual difficulty. I was just talking to a pastor here in Charlottesville yesterday and he was saying he’s been counseling folks who are not having sex, and there are reasons why that’s the case, but to sort of help people move beyond these situations, for the sake of their kids, but also to help them repair their own marriages as well.

Coaston: You bring up in the book “Nikki Haleyism” and the ways the Republican Party has failed to support families. Can you tell me more about that? What is “Nikki Haleyism”?

Wilcox: So it’s this basic idea that we can hearken back to President Ronald Reagan and assumes that the answer to many of our problems, including our family problems, is just less regulation and lower taxes — that a booming economy lifts all boats. And that we shouldn’t be thinking about measures to expand the child tax credit. We shouldn’t be thinking deeply about the ways in which a lot of our young men and teenage boys are struggling in this new economy and in this current culture.

Coaston: Something the book doesn’t get into is how to get married, how to find a partner who wishes to marry. Is that something you think that the government should perhaps play a role in as well?

Wilcox: No. But we can think about civil society and family doing a better job of trying to connect young adults, potential partners. We’re facing a kind of demographic tsunami of sorts when it comes to marriage and childbearing, where a large minority may never marry, never have kids. And so I think parents, professors, teachers, peers, good friends should be a lot more intentional about connecting their friends, their children, their students to potential prospects who would be good for dating and then maybe for marriage down the road.

Coaston: You argue that “not enough male teachers, too little recess, books that don’t speak to the male imagination, and intolerance to the boisterous spirit of boys in our nation’s schools are among the many factors driving” unmotivated boys and men. What are the alternatives, given that girls seem to be succeeding just fine and men have been discouraged from the teaching profession, including by conservatives?

Wilcox: So I would certainly agree with Richard Reeves here that we should do more to get men in the teaching professions, and I would disagree with my fellow conservatives who discouraged men on that front. I think giving our younger boys more recess is one kind of thing that could be helpful. I think doing more to revive single-sex classes and schools would be helpful here as well in terms of recognizing that oftentimes there is a distinctive approach to schooling and social life that school-aged boys have and that we could work with that grain rather than against it. And thinking about the kinds of stories you tell in class or have the kids read in class, the kinds of historical subjects that get front-loaded. We also just need to give higher priority to strengthening vocational tracks in our high schools, which would I think give a lot of young men who are not on that striver path, not just a pathway toward better paying careers and good jobs, but a clear sense of their own self-worth.

[ Richard Reeves, who wrote a widely discussed book about the struggles of men and boys, has argued that more men should become teachers. ]

Coaston: Some people have children together, they already share a home, but they aren’t married. What are ways to urge them to get married?

Wilcox: There is a marriage penalty associated oftentimes with a lot of our means-tested programs like Medicaid, for instance, and food stamps. If you go above that income threshold, you often lose the benefit or you’ll lose some part of the benefit. I think one thing we could do is to double the threshold for means-tested programs and policies like Medicaid for married versus single parents to reduce the effect of that penalty. One working-class Virginia couple I spoke to, for instance, had two young daughters; the mom and the two kids were on the Medicaid program here in Virginia, but they hadn’t gotten married in large part because they didn’t want to lose access to Medicaid. His job did not provide health-care insurance.

I was recently doing an event, at a local restaurant here, and talking about marriage. And afterward a waitress at the restaurant came up to me and conveyed the same scenario. Her partner was actually a chef in the restaurant. They have two kids, she and her two kids are on Medicaid in Virginia, and they’re not married, even though they have come to consider themselves to be married, because of this concern. So we have to think about ways to do no harm with our public policies targeting, especially working-class couples with kids.

Coaston: How do you think contemporary politics and the role of hypocrisy has impacted marriage rates or has it?

Wilcox: There are plenty of examples on the Republican side where we’re seeing Republican leaders behave badly when it comes to marriage. That’s clearly part of our problem, I would say. It also explains why some of our Republican leaders or conservative leaders are actually not very good at articulating a marriage friendly message. I also talk in the book about how many of our elites, primarily on the left, are inverted hypocrites. They’re living better lives in private than they’re kind of standing for in public. And so I think we often have elites who are either publicly deriding or devaluing marriage or who are kind of practically denying its value.

So I talk about people ranging from Hollywood moguls to Washington editors who are living very kind of neo-traditional family lives. They’re stably married, they’re prosperous, both they and their spouse and their kids are benefiting from this institution. And yet the kinds of cultural programming that they’re sponsoring, the kinds of media stories that they’re presiding over are often sending an anti-nuptial message to the broader public.

Coaston: My final question would be, to me, a deceptively simple one: Do you think people don’t get married because they don’t want to?

Wilcox: I was talking to a graduate student recently. He had a very clear sense of his plan for schooling and work, and then I said, what’s your plan about marriage and dating? And there was silence. He didn’t really have a plan. I think that’s part of the challenge — that people are not being intentional enough about seeking opportunities to meet, date and marry young adults in their world. On the one hand, there’s people who expect too much from marriage on the romantic side, but secondarily, practically, they’re often focusing a lot more on work and education than they are on preparing for a marital and family future.

But I think lower down the class ladder, there’s kind of more of an accessibility issue playing out in American life for young adults. Some of our public policies practically penalize marriage, make it less financially appealing, particularly for working-class and poor America. And I’ve spoken to a number of working-class women who kind of express concern about their partners or husband’s lack of full-time employment, and his lack of assistance on the home front — just kind of the male malaise, we might call it, is more likely to be expressed in many working class and poor communities.

We also just have fewer norms governing, dating, sex, co-resident marriage. I’m not saying go back to 1955. But there isn’t really much in the way of common cultural guidance to sort of help script the transition from being single to being successfully married in our culture.

I think the challenge — when it comes to making the case for getting married — is that we have to address making people’s expectations for marriage more realistic, but also sort of underline how important marriage is, both for them and their kids and for the country at large. And then to make marriage more accessible to working-class and poor Americans by reforming public policies, giving people some more common sense advice about the value of marriage and the path to marriage and helping our young men become more marriageable.

Jane Coaston is a contributing Opinion writer. Previously, she was the host of Opinion’s podcast “The Argument”; she was also the senior politics reporter at Vox, with a focus on conservatism and the G.O.P.

The Times is committed to publishing a diversity of letters to the editor. We’d like to hear what you think about this or any of our articles. Here are some tips . And here’s our email: [email protected] .

Follow the New York Times Opinion section on Facebook , Instagram , TikTok , X and Threads .

Jane Coaston was the host of Opinion’s podcast “ The Argument .” Previously, she reported on conservative politics, the G.O.P. and the rise of the right. She also co-hosted the podcast “The Weeds.” @ janecoaston

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  2. Transition Words and Definitions, Transition Words For Essays

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  3. Transition signals in writing

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  4. 100+ Important Transition Words and Phrases with Examples

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  1. PERSUASIVE ESSAY Part2 Breakdown

  2. Transition words for Essay, Part 1

  3. PERSUASIVE ESSAY Part6 Transition Sentences

  4. Writing Academic English _ Chapter 7 _ Comparison and Contrast Essays

  5. ADDITION SIGNALS #SHORTS

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  1. 92 Essay Transition Words to Know, With Examples

    The type of transition word or phrase signals which type of change is coming. For example, transition words like therefore show a cause-and-effect relationship, while transition words like in conclusion introduce a summary or wrap-up. Often, conjunctive adverbs work well as transition words.

  2. Transition Words & Phrases

    Revised on August 23, 2023. Transition words and phrases (also called linking words, connecting words, or transitional words) are used to link together different ideas in your text. They help the reader to follow your arguments by expressing the relationships between different sentences or parts of a sentence. Transition words example

  3. Transitions

    Sentence pair #1: Ineffective Transition Some experts argue that focusing on individual actions to combat climate change takes the focus away from the collective action required to keep carbon levels from rising. Change will not be effected, say some others, unless individual actions raise the necessary awareness.

  4. Transition signals

    Writing Cohesion Transition signals In addition... However... Likewise... Transition signals are useful in achieving good cohesion and coherence in your writing. This page gives information on what transition signals are, the grammar of transition signals, and different types of transition signals.

  5. Transitions

    Transitions signal relationships between ideas—relationships such as: "Another example coming up—stay alert!" or "Here's an exception to my previous statement" or "Although this idea appears to be true, here's the real story."

  6. Transition Sentences

    Published on June 9, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023. Clear transitions are crucial to clear writing: They show the reader how different parts of your essay, paper, or thesis are connected. Transition sentences can be used to structure your text and link together paragraphs or sections.

  7. Guide to Transition Signals in Writing

    Transition signals are connecting words or phrases that strengthen the internal cohesion of your writing. Transition signals act like bridges between parts of your writing. They link your sentences and paragraphs together smoothly so that they flow and there are no abrupt jumps or breaks between ideas.

  8. 7.3: Use transitions and signposts to develop relationships between

    Figure 7.3.2 7.3. 2. Choose an essay or piece of writing, either that you're currently working on, or that you've written in the past. Identify your major topics or main ideas. Then, using this chapter, develop at least three examples of sentence-level transitions and at least two examples of paragraph-level transitions.

  9. Transition signals

    Transition signals are linking words or phrases that connect your ideas and add cohesion to your writing. They signpost or indicate to the reader the relationships between sentences and between paragraphs, making it easier for the reader to understand your ideas. We use a variety of transition signals to fulfil a number of functions.

  10. Common Transition Words and Phrases

    Transitions clarify the logic of your argument by orienting your reader as you develop ideas between sentences and paragraphs. These tools should alert readers to shifts in your argument while and also maintain the smoothness and clarity of your prose. Below, you'll find some of the most commonly used transition categories and examples of each.

  11. Transition words for essays

    Classroom Transition words for essays By Amy Mallory-Kani / Apr 21 2022 The right transition words can transform a mediocre essay into a great paper. In this post, we discuss why effective transitions can substantially improve the quality and readability of your essay and provide examples of commonly used transition words. What are transitions?

  12. Transitions & Signal Words

    Transitions & Signal Words We use transitions in writing to connect ideas and signal to readers that we are moving through our discussion. Transitions help writers organize their papers and help readers understand how ideas and parts of the paper fit together. These transitions can occur Between Paragraphs and Between Sentences. Between Paragraphs

  13. Transitions

    Good transitions can connect paragraphs and turn disconnected writing into a unified whole. Instead of treating paragraphs as separate ideas, transitions can help readers understand how paragraphs work together, reference one another, and build to a larger point. The key to producing good transitions is highlighting connections between ...

  14. 220 Good Transition Words for Essays by Experts

    Transition Words for Essays for First Body Paragraph. Here is a list of transition words that you can use for the first body paragraph of an essay: Firstly. To start off. Primarily. Another important factor is. To begin with. In the beginning. Above all.

  15. Transition Words and Phrases Examples

    Transition words are words that help writing move smoothly from one topic to another without confusing the reader. Words like however, next, or in conclusion prepare the reader by signaling that the topic is shifting.

  16. 5 Common Transition Signal Errors & How to Fix Them

    I bring this up because reading an essay where transition signals are used incorrectly is like being subjected to a lot of unpleasant noise. To recap, transition signals are words and phrases that, when used correctly, enhance the flow of an essay. Read our post introducing some key types of transition signals here.

  17. (PDF) THE USE OF TRANSITION SIGNALS IN EFL ACADEMIC ...

    Transition signal is one of prominent cohesive devices that should be taken into account in academic writing. This study aims to identify students' problems and tendency in using transition...

  18. A List of Transition Words to Use for Argumentative Essays

    Also known as linking words, transition words make basic connections between sentences and paragraphs to show a relationship between ideas. A strong transition is crucial when writing an essay. It's not enough that you provide complete information about your main points and supporting details.

  19. A List of 200+ Transition Words For Essays

    1. What are Good Transition Words for Essays? 2. Examples of Different Types of Transition Words 3. Transition Words for Argumentative Essays 4. Transition Words for Persuasive Essays 5. Transition Words for Compare and Contrast Essays 6. Transition Words for Informative Essays 7. Transition Words for Expository Essays 8.

  20. Transition Signals Definition and Examples

    How to Use Transition Signals. Use the words " for example " and " for instance " when the example you are about to write is a complete sentence. Both of these transition signals have the same meaning. They can be placed at the beginning of the sentence and followed by a comma (,). Pattern 1.

  21. Transition Words: Examples In Sentences, Paragraphs & Essays

    Updated May 5, 2021 Image Credits Transitional words and phrases help make a piece of writing flow better and connect one idea to the next. Because there's more than one way to connect ideas, there are many types of transitional phrases to show a variety of relationships.

  22. The Use of Transitional Signals in Essay Writing by EFL Students

    Transitional signals are very important in writing essays. Therefore, this research aimed to find out the types of transitional signals and their accuracy in sentences. The research used a descriptive quantitative method. There were 68 students taken randomly from the population. The instrument used to collect data was a writing test.

  23. 33 Transition Words for Essays

    33 Transition Words and Phrases. 'Besides,' 'furthermore,' 'although,' and other words to help you jump from one idea to the next. Transitional terms give writers the opportunity to prepare readers for a new idea, connecting the previous sentence to the next one. Many transitional words are nearly synonymous: words that broadly indicate that ...

  24. Steps to Writing an Essay: The Complete Guide

    3. Creating an outline: A good essay should be supported by a proper outline.Break down your essay into three main parts: The introduction, body, and conclusion. The introduction lists the main ...

  25. Opinion

    Wilcox: There is a marriage penalty associated oftentimes with a lot of our means-tested programs like Medicaid, for instance, and food stamps. If you go above that income threshold, you often ...