How to Write an Informative Essay in 7 Steps

Lindsay Kramer

An essay that educates its readers is known as an informative essay. In an informative essay, your goal is to answer a question. This question can be specific, like “Why doesn’t AP style use the Oxford comma ?” Or it can be fairly broad, like “What is punctuation ?”

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What is an informative essay? 

An informative essay is an essay that explains a topic. Informative essays come in many forms; one might explain how a system works, analyze data, summarize an event, compare two or more subjects, or walk the reader through a process step-by-step. 

Unlike reaction essays, reflective essays , and narrative essays , informative essays are purely objective pieces of writing. When reading an informative essay, the reader should not encounter the author’s opinion or perspective. Instead, they should learn something factual. 

How is an informative essay structured?

Your informative essay starts with an introduction paragraph. This paragraph includes your thesis statement, which is a concise summary of your essay’s focus. In a persuasive or argumentative essay, the thesis statement is typically the author’s position, which the author then supports and defends in the body paragraphs. In an informative essay, it’s a sentence that clearly states what the essay will cover. 

In addition to your thesis statement, your introduction paragraph should include the points you’ll discuss in your body paragraphs, as well as an interesting statement to hook your reader’s interest. This can be an important statistic, a surprising fact, or an engaging anecdote that makes the reader want to learn more. 

Your essay’s body paragraphs make up the bulk of its content. This section is where you present facts, statistics, and all relevant details to support your thesis statement. In an informative essay that walks the reader through a process, the body paragraphs explain the process. 

Each body paragraph should focus on one topic. For an essay comparing two events, write a paragraph for each event, thoroughly summarizing it and including all relevant facts. If you’re writing an essay that explains how to complete a task, dedicate a body paragraph to explaining each step in the process. 

Conclusion 

In the conclusion section, summarize your essay in a few sentences. Think of this as a recap of the points you made in your body paragraphs. Somewhere within this recap, reiterate your thesis statement. You don’t need to restate it in the exact same words you used in your introduction, but you should remind the reader of your essay’s primary focus. 

7 steps for writing an informative essay

1 select topic.

If you aren’t assigned a topic, you’ll need to choose your own. Choose a topic you can sufficiently explain in approximately five paragraphs .

Once you’ve chosen a general topic, narrow it down to the specific subject you’ll cover in your essay. This process, known as brainstorming, often involves some preliminary research.

The next step is to thoroughly research your topic. During this phase, choose credible sources you can cite in your work. 

3 Create an outline

After you’ve conducted your research and determined which sources you’ll use in your essay, write an essay outline . An essay outline is a bare-bones “skeleton” version of your essay that briefly mentions what you’ll discuss in each paragraph. 

Following your outline’s structure , write your essay. At this stage, don’t stress about getting the tone just right or maintaining perfect flow between paragraphs; these are things you’ll refine during the revision stage. Focus on getting words on the page that craft an easy-to-follow look at your topic. Your tone should be objective, informative, and without literary devices. 

Once you’re finished writing your first draft, take a break. Revisit it again, ideally a day later, and read it carefully. Take note of how effectively your sources support the points you make, how your writing flows from one paragraph to the next, and how well you explain your topic overall. Then rewrite any parts that can be made stronger. By the time you’re finished rewriting these, you’ll have your second draft. 

6 Proofread

You’re not done yet! After you’ve finished revising your work, read it again to check for any spelling or grammatical mistakes. It’s also helpful to double-check the facts you cite at this stage to ensure they’re all accurate. 

7 Document citations 

The last part of writing an informative essay is writing a citations page. Because an informative essay includes statistics, facts, and other pieces of objective data, you need to credit the sources you consulted to find this data. How you format your citations page depends on whether your essay is written in MLA , APA , or Chicago style . 

Informative essay example

Topic: Troubleshooting Common Wi-Fi Problems

Intro: In the introduction, mention specific Wi-Fi problems the reader might encounter. These could include a slow network, connectivity difficulty, and the reasons why one device might be unable to connect despite other devices connecting to the network easily. The thesis statement would state that these Wi-Fi problems are easy to troubleshoot and can usually be fixed without tech support. 

Body paragraph: This paragraph is about troubleshooting a slow network. Discuss symptoms of a slow network, common causes of a slow network, and strategies the reader can use to speed up their Wi-Fi. 

Body paragraph: This paragraph is about connectivity difficulty. Discuss scenarios in which none of the reader’s devices are able to connect to Wi-Fi and mention solutions they can try.

Body paragraph: This final body paragraph discusses scenarios when all devices but one can connect. Discuss reasons why one device might be unable to connect to the Wi-Fi despite all other devices connecting perfectly fine. 

Conclusion: In the final paragraph, summarize the main reasons why the reader might be facing Wi-Fi difficulties and common troubleshooting strategies. Then restate your thesis statement and conclude the essay by briefly mentioning that if none of these strategies work, the reader should call their IT department or internet provider. 

Informative essay FAQs

What is an informative essay.

An informative essay is an essay that explains a specific topic. The purpose is to provide a clear, objective explanation of a subject.

Body paragraph

What are the steps to writing an informative essay?

  • Select topic
  • Create an outline
  • Write essay
  • Document citations 

how to write a conclusion for a informative essay

One of the most common questions we receive at the Writing Center is “what am I supposed to do in my conclusion?” This is a difficult question to answer because there’s no one right answer to what belongs in a conclusion. How you conclude your paper will depend on where you started—and where you traveled. It will also depend on the conventions and expectations of the discipline in which you are writing. For example, while the conclusion to a STEM paper could focus on questions for further study, the conclusion of a literature paper could include a quotation from your central text that can now be understood differently in light of what has been discussed in the paper. You should consult your instructor about expectations for conclusions in a particular discipline.

With that in mind, here are some general guidelines you might find helpful to use as you think about your conclusion.  

Begin with the “what”  

In a short paper—even a research paper—you don’t need to provide an exhaustive summary as part of your conclusion. But you do need to make some kind of transition between your final body paragraph and your concluding paragraph. This may come in the form of a few sentences of summary. Or it may come in the form of a sentence that brings your readers back to your thesis or main idea and reminds your readers where you began and how far you have traveled.

So, for example, in a paper about the relationship between ADHD and rejection sensitivity, Vanessa Roser begins by introducing readers to the fact that researchers have studied the relationship between the two conditions and then provides her explanation of that relationship. Here’s her thesis: “While socialization may indeed be an important factor in RS, I argue that individuals with ADHD may also possess a neurological predisposition to RS that is exacerbated by the differing executive and emotional regulation characteristic of ADHD.”

In her final paragraph, Roser reminds us of where she started by echoing her thesis: “This literature demonstrates that, as with many other conditions, ADHD and RS share a delicately intertwined pattern of neurological similarities that is rooted in the innate biology of an individual’s mind, a connection that cannot be explained in full by the behavioral mediation hypothesis.”  

Highlight the “so what”  

At the beginning of your paper, you explain to your readers what’s at stake—why they should care about the argument you’re making. In your conclusion, you can bring readers back to those stakes by reminding them why your argument is important in the first place. You can also draft a few sentences that put those stakes into a new or broader context.

In the conclusion to her paper about ADHD and RS, Roser echoes the stakes she established in her introduction—that research into connections between ADHD and RS has led to contradictory results, raising questions about the “behavioral mediation hypothesis.”

She writes, “as with many other conditions, ADHD and RS share a delicately intertwined pattern of neurological similarities that is rooted in the innate biology of an individual’s mind, a connection that cannot be explained in full by the behavioral mediation hypothesis.”  

Leave your readers with the “now what”  

After the “what” and the “so what,” you should leave your reader with some final thoughts. If you have written a strong introduction, your readers will know why you have been arguing what you have been arguing—and why they should care. And if you’ve made a good case for your thesis, then your readers should be in a position to see things in a new way, understand new questions, or be ready for something that they weren’t ready for before they read your paper.

In her conclusion, Roser offers two “now what” statements. First, she explains that it is important to recognize that the flawed behavioral mediation hypothesis “seems to place a degree of fault on the individual. It implies that individuals with ADHD must have elicited such frequent or intense rejection by virtue of their inadequate social skills, erasing the possibility that they may simply possess a natural sensitivity to emotion.” She then highlights the broader implications for treatment of people with ADHD, noting that recognizing the actual connection between rejection sensitivity and ADHD “has profound implications for understanding how individuals with ADHD might best be treated in educational settings, by counselors, family, peers, or even society as a whole.”

To find your own “now what” for your essay’s conclusion, try asking yourself these questions:

  • What can my readers now understand, see in a new light, or grapple with that they would not have understood in the same way before reading my paper? Are we a step closer to understanding a larger phenomenon or to understanding why what was at stake is so important?  
  • What questions can I now raise that would not have made sense at the beginning of my paper? Questions for further research? Other ways that this topic could be approached?  
  • Are there other applications for my research? Could my questions be asked about different data in a different context? Could I use my methods to answer a different question?  
  • What action should be taken in light of this argument? What action do I predict will be taken or could lead to a solution?  
  • What larger context might my argument be a part of?  

What to avoid in your conclusion  

  • a complete restatement of all that you have said in your paper.  
  • a substantial counterargument that you do not have space to refute; you should introduce counterarguments before your conclusion.  
  • an apology for what you have not said. If you need to explain the scope of your paper, you should do this sooner—but don’t apologize for what you have not discussed in your paper.  
  • fake transitions like “in conclusion” that are followed by sentences that aren’t actually conclusions. (“In conclusion, I have now demonstrated that my thesis is correct.”)
  • picture_as_pdf Conclusions

The Writing Center • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Conclusions

What this handout is about.

This handout will explain the functions of conclusions, offer strategies for writing effective ones, help you evaluate conclusions you’ve drafted, and suggest approaches to avoid.

About conclusions

Introductions and conclusions can be difficult to write, but they’re worth investing time in. They can have a significant influence on a reader’s experience of your paper.

Just as your introduction acts as a bridge that transports your readers from their own lives into the “place” of your analysis, your conclusion can provide a bridge to help your readers make the transition back to their daily lives. Such a conclusion will help them see why all your analysis and information should matter to them after they put the paper down.

Your conclusion is your chance to have the last word on the subject. The conclusion allows you to have the final say on the issues you have raised in your paper, to synthesize your thoughts, to demonstrate the importance of your ideas, and to propel your reader to a new view of the subject. It is also your opportunity to make a good final impression and to end on a positive note.

Your conclusion can go beyond the confines of the assignment. The conclusion pushes beyond the boundaries of the prompt and allows you to consider broader issues, make new connections, and elaborate on the significance of your findings.

Your conclusion should make your readers glad they read your paper. Your conclusion gives your reader something to take away that will help them see things differently or appreciate your topic in personally relevant ways. It can suggest broader implications that will not only interest your reader, but also enrich your reader’s life in some way. It is your gift to the reader.

Strategies for writing an effective conclusion

One or more of the following strategies may help you write an effective conclusion:

  • Play the “So What” Game. If you’re stuck and feel like your conclusion isn’t saying anything new or interesting, ask a friend to read it with you. Whenever you make a statement from your conclusion, ask the friend to say, “So what?” or “Why should anybody care?” Then ponder that question and answer it. Here’s how it might go: You: Basically, I’m just saying that education was important to Douglass. Friend: So what? You: Well, it was important because it was a key to him feeling like a free and equal citizen. Friend: Why should anybody care? You: That’s important because plantation owners tried to keep slaves from being educated so that they could maintain control. When Douglass obtained an education, he undermined that control personally. You can also use this strategy on your own, asking yourself “So What?” as you develop your ideas or your draft.
  • Return to the theme or themes in the introduction. This strategy brings the reader full circle. For example, if you begin by describing a scenario, you can end with the same scenario as proof that your essay is helpful in creating a new understanding. You may also refer to the introductory paragraph by using key words or parallel concepts and images that you also used in the introduction.
  • Synthesize, don’t summarize. Include a brief summary of the paper’s main points, but don’t simply repeat things that were in your paper. Instead, show your reader how the points you made and the support and examples you used fit together. Pull it all together.
  • Include a provocative insight or quotation from the research or reading you did for your paper.
  • Propose a course of action, a solution to an issue, or questions for further study. This can redirect your reader’s thought process and help her to apply your info and ideas to her own life or to see the broader implications.
  • Point to broader implications. For example, if your paper examines the Greensboro sit-ins or another event in the Civil Rights Movement, you could point out its impact on the Civil Rights Movement as a whole. A paper about the style of writer Virginia Woolf could point to her influence on other writers or on later feminists.

Strategies to avoid

  • Beginning with an unnecessary, overused phrase such as “in conclusion,” “in summary,” or “in closing.” Although these phrases can work in speeches, they come across as wooden and trite in writing.
  • Stating the thesis for the very first time in the conclusion.
  • Introducing a new idea or subtopic in your conclusion.
  • Ending with a rephrased thesis statement without any substantive changes.
  • Making sentimental, emotional appeals that are out of character with the rest of an analytical paper.
  • Including evidence (quotations, statistics, etc.) that should be in the body of the paper.

Four kinds of ineffective conclusions

  • The “That’s My Story and I’m Sticking to It” Conclusion. This conclusion just restates the thesis and is usually painfully short. It does not push the ideas forward. People write this kind of conclusion when they can’t think of anything else to say. Example: In conclusion, Frederick Douglass was, as we have seen, a pioneer in American education, proving that education was a major force for social change with regard to slavery.
  • The “Sherlock Holmes” Conclusion. Sometimes writers will state the thesis for the very first time in the conclusion. You might be tempted to use this strategy if you don’t want to give everything away too early in your paper. You may think it would be more dramatic to keep the reader in the dark until the end and then “wow” him with your main idea, as in a Sherlock Holmes mystery. The reader, however, does not expect a mystery, but an analytical discussion of your topic in an academic style, with the main argument (thesis) stated up front. Example: (After a paper that lists numerous incidents from the book but never says what these incidents reveal about Douglass and his views on education): So, as the evidence above demonstrates, Douglass saw education as a way to undermine the slaveholders’ power and also an important step toward freedom.
  • The “America the Beautiful”/”I Am Woman”/”We Shall Overcome” Conclusion. This kind of conclusion usually draws on emotion to make its appeal, but while this emotion and even sentimentality may be very heartfelt, it is usually out of character with the rest of an analytical paper. A more sophisticated commentary, rather than emotional praise, would be a more fitting tribute to the topic. Example: Because of the efforts of fine Americans like Frederick Douglass, countless others have seen the shining beacon of light that is education. His example was a torch that lit the way for others. Frederick Douglass was truly an American hero.
  • The “Grab Bag” Conclusion. This kind of conclusion includes extra information that the writer found or thought of but couldn’t integrate into the main paper. You may find it hard to leave out details that you discovered after hours of research and thought, but adding random facts and bits of evidence at the end of an otherwise-well-organized essay can just create confusion. Example: In addition to being an educational pioneer, Frederick Douglass provides an interesting case study for masculinity in the American South. He also offers historians an interesting glimpse into slave resistance when he confronts Covey, the overseer. His relationships with female relatives reveal the importance of family in the slave community.

Works consulted

We consulted these works while writing this handout. This is not a comprehensive list of resources on the handout’s topic, and we encourage you to do your own research to find additional publications. Please do not use this list as a model for the format of your own reference list, as it may not match the citation style you are using. For guidance on formatting citations, please see the UNC Libraries citation tutorial . We revise these tips periodically and welcome feedback.

Douglass, Frederick. 1995. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself. New York: Dover.

Hamilton College. n.d. “Conclusions.” Writing Center. Accessed June 14, 2019. https://www.hamilton.edu//academics/centers/writing/writing-resources/conclusions .

Holewa, Randa. 2004. “Strategies for Writing a Conclusion.” LEO: Literacy Education Online. Last updated February 19, 2004. https://leo.stcloudstate.edu/acadwrite/conclude.html.

You may reproduce it for non-commercial use if you use the entire handout and attribute the source: The Writing Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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Conclusions

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This resource outlines the generally accepted structure for introductions, body paragraphs, and conclusions in an academic argument paper. Keep in mind that this resource contains guidelines and not strict rules about organization. Your structure needs to be flexible enough to meet the requirements of your purpose and audience.

Conclusions wrap up what you have been discussing in your paper. After moving from general to specific information in the introduction and body paragraphs, your conclusion should begin pulling back into more general information that restates the main points of your argument. Conclusions may also call for action or overview future possible research. The following outline may help you conclude your paper:

In a general way,

  • Restate your topic and why it is important,
  • Restate your thesis/claim,
  • Address opposing viewpoints and explain why readers should align with your position,
  • Call for action or overview future research possibilities.

Remember that once you accomplish these tasks, unless otherwise directed by your instructor, you are finished. Done. Complete. Don't try to bring in new points or end with a whiz bang(!) conclusion or try to solve world hunger in the final sentence of your conclusion. Simplicity is best for a clear, convincing message.

The preacher's maxim is one of the most effective formulas to follow for argument papers:

Tell what you're going to tell them (introduction).

Tell them (body).

Tell them what you told them (conclusion).

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how-to-write-a-conclusion-of-an-informative-essay

How to Write a Conclusion of an Informative Essay

  • Restate a thesis.
  • Wrap up subtopics.
  • Leave readers with food for thought.

So now you finish the assigned paper and wonder how to write a conclusion of an informative essay. Congrats! You’re at the right place:

This guide will reveal all the details about the process: the elements of an informative essay conclusion, how to connect them to an essay body, and why end on a positive note to leave a reader with food for thought.

how-to-write-a-conclusion-of-an-informative-essay

What is an Informative Essay Conclusion?

We nailed it a long ago in our super popular article about essay conclusions :

A concluding paragraph of your essay is as critical as its introduction. It summarizes the content, provides closure for readers to remember the main idea of your work, and leaves the audience with food for thought.

Long story short, your essay conclusion needs to answer a “What now?” question, giving the audience something to think about after they’ve read your paper.

A good essay conclusion restates a thesis and main ideas, providing a sense of closure. It concludes the thoughts you covered in the essay body, not presenting new ideas.

Tip: Try to finish your informative essay on a positive note, even if the topic itself wasn’t so. It will influence the final impression of your work. Make your conclusion short and sweet, no longer than 5-7 sentences in length.

Conclusion of an Informative Essay

informative-essay-conclusions

Informative essay conclusions need to relate to the information in your previous paragraphs. As a writer, you have three steps to do that:

  • Restate thesis statement
  • Restate main ideas
  • Finish with a call to action

Let’s reveal more details on each one!

P.S. For better clarity, we’ll use a well-known example with pandas. (Remember we addressed it in other blog posts about informative essays ?

Restate Thesis Statement

A thesis statement should remind readers about the main idea and subtopics of the essay they’ve just read.

We bet you remember the formula for writing a thesis statement in informative essays: main topic + subtopic 1 + subtopic 2 + subtopic 3 , connected in one sentence using correct grammar. When writing about introductions, we used this thesis statement example:

  • Giant pandas have special characteristics, live in certain areas of China, and eat food besides just bamboo!

A key aspect to remember when writing a conclusion: Never use the same sentence twice in an essay. What you need to do is take the same ideas but restate your thesis statement in an interesting way yet with the same information.

  • Giant pandas are fascinating animals, and there are many interesting facts to remember about their characteristics, their home, and their diet.

Here we have the same subtopics (characteristics, home, and food), and yet they are not the same but rewritten a bit.

Once again, a big thank goes to Mr. S from YouTube for his panda examples!

Restate Main Ideas

Now it’s time to restate your main ideas by using essay body paragraphs.

Your first paragraph was about giant panda’s special characteristics:

Reread it to remind yourself what you’ve already covered because (again!) you don’t want to use the same fact twice in your paper. Then, go back to your informative essay outline and check which fact is missed but still worth using for an essay. Let’s say, you might forget to include the info about giant pandas’ size:

  • The bear is only six feet long, not as giant as some people may think.

So, you take this fact and write it down in your essay conclusion.

Then, go to your essay body’s second and third paragraphs to do the same: Reread them and make sure the second and third restatements of your main idea answer the subtopics coved in those paragraphs.

For example, you could mention the following information about giant pandas’ homes and diet:

  • Only 2,000 of these black and white bears are left living in the mountains of central China. (To remind readers that many pandas are left, so we need to be careful with what we have left on earth.)
  • Though pandas do eat a great deal of bamboo, they also eat eggs and some small animals. (To remind readers that pandas don’t only eat bamboo, which is the most common thing people know about these wonderful creatures.)

Now you’re done with the restatement of the main ideas, and it’s time to move to the last part of your informative essay conclusion.

Finish with a Call to Action

While there are many ways to finish a paper, a compelling call to action works best for informative essays.

If you left a paper just as it is, with a restated thesis and main ideas, it would sound a bit awkward. A concluding sentence of your essay should provide a sense of closure and answer the “And what now?” question the audience might have after reading your work.

A few variants of calls to action for your informative essay about pandas could be as follows:

  • Now, go read more about pandas! (Well, this one is super boring and simplistic.)
  • Now, it’s time to schedule a visit to a nearby zoo that has one of these amazing animals. (This one is better, providing readers with some thought.)
  • Now that you have read some general information about giant pandas, go to your library to find out more information or learn about a different one of your favorite animals! (Let’s stay with this one.)

That said, here’s what your informative essay conclusion would look like if you wrote about giant pandas:

conclude-informative-essays-example

As you’ve probably noticed, we’ve added a few linking words to the conclusion (“furthermore” and “finally”) to give it a natural flow and make the whole paragraph sound better.

Like other essay types, informative papers need a conclusion that would summarize the main points and leave a reader with a positive impression and food for thought. So, when you wonder how to write a conclusion for an informative essay, follow these three steps:

  • Restate your thesis statement (the same thoughts with other words)
  • Restate main ideas (subtopics you covered in body paragraphs)
  • Finish with a call to action (What should the audience do after reading your work? Please think of encouraging them to get involved in something for further knowledge or research.)

Any questions left? You can always contact our writers , or feel free to leave a comment in the section below!

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5 Examples of Concluding Words for Essays

5 Examples of Concluding Words for Essays

4-minute read

  • 19th September 2022

If you’re a student writing an essay or research paper, it’s important to make sure your points flow together well. You’ll want to use connecting words (known formally as transition signals) to do this. Transition signals like thus , also , and furthermore link different ideas, and when you get to the end of your work, you need to use these to mark your conclusion. Read on to learn more about transition signals and how to use them to conclude your essays.

Transition Signals

Transition signals link sentences together cohesively, enabling easy reading and comprehension. They are usually placed at the beginning of a sentence and separated from the remaining words with a comma. There are several types of transition signals, including those to:

●  show the order of a sequence of events (e.g., first, then, next)

●  introduce an example (e.g., specifically, for instance)

●  indicate a contrasting idea (e.g., but, however, although)

●  present an additional idea (e.g., also, in addition, plus)

●  indicate time (e.g., beforehand, meanwhile, later)

●  compare (e.g., likewise, similarly)

●  show cause and effect (e.g., thus, as a result)

●  mark the conclusion – which we’ll focus on in this guide.

When you reach the end of an essay, you should start the concluding paragraph with a transition signal that acts as a bridge to the summary of your key points. Check out some concluding transition signals below and learn how you can use them in your writing.

To Conclude…

This is a particularly versatile closing statement that can be used for almost any kind of essay, including both formal and informal academic writing. It signals to the reader that you will briefly restate the main idea. As an alternative, you can begin the summary with “to close” or “in conclusion.” In an argumentative piece, you can use this phrase to indicate a call to action or opinion:

To conclude, Abraham Lincoln was the best president because he abolished slavery.

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As Has Been Demonstrated…

To describe how the evidence presented in your essay supports your argument or main idea, begin the concluding paragraph with “as has been demonstrated.” This phrase is best used for research papers or articles with heavy empirical or statistical evidence.

As has been demonstrated by the study presented above, human activities are negatively altering the climate system.

The Above Points Illustrate…

As another transitional phrase for formal or academic work, “the above points illustrate” indicates that you are reiterating your argument and that the conclusion will include an assessment of the evidence you’ve presented.

The above points illustrate that children prefer chocolate over broccoli.

In a Nutshell…

A simple and informal metaphor to begin a conclusion, “in a nutshell” prepares the reader for a summary of your paper. It can work in narratives and speeches but should be avoided in formal situations.

In a nutshell, the Beatles had an impact on musicians for generations to come.

Overall, It Can Be Said…

To recap an idea at the end of a critical or descriptive essay, you can use this phrase at the beginning of the concluding paragraph. “Overall” means “taking everything into account,” and it sums up your essay in a formal way. You can use “overall” on its own as a transition signal, or you can use it as part of a phrase.

Overall, it can be said that art has had a positive impact on humanity.

Proofreading and Editing

Transition signals are crucial to crafting a well-written and cohesive essay. For your next writing assignment, make sure you include plenty of transition signals, and check out this post for more tips on how to improve your writing. And before you turn in your paper, don’t forget to have someone proofread your work. Our expert editors will make sure your essay includes all the transition signals necessary for your writing to flow seamlessly. Send in a free 500-word sample today!

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how to write a conclusion for a informative essay

Writing an Informative Essay

Informative essays engage readers with new, interesting, and often surprising facts and details about a subject. Informative essays are educational; readers expect to learn something new from them. In fact, much of the reading and writing done in college and the workplace is informative. From textbooks to reports to tutorials like this one, informative writing imparts important and useful information about a topic.

This tutorial refers to the sample informative outline and final essay written by fictional student Paige Turner.

Reasons to Write Informatively

Your purpose for writing and the audience for whom you are writing will impact the depth and breadth of information you provide, but all informative writing aims to present a subject without opinions or bias. Some common reasons to write informatively are to

  • report findings that an audience would find interesting,
  • present facts that an audience would find useful, and
  • communicate information about a person, place, event, issue, or change that would improve an audience’s understanding.

Characteristics of Informative Essays

Informative essays present factual information and do not attempt to sway readers’ opinions about it. Other types of academic and workplace writing do try to influence readers’ opinions:

  • Expository essays aim to expose a truth about an issue in order to influence how readers view the issue.
  • Persuasive essays aim to influence readers’ opinions, so they will adopt a particular position or take a certain course of action.

Expository and persuasive essays make “arguments.” The only argument an informative essay makes is that something exists, did exist, is happening, or has happened, and the point of the essay is not to convince readers of this but to tell them about it.

  • Informative essays seek to enlighten and educate readers, so they can make their own educated opinions and decisions about what to think and how to act.

Strategies for Writing Informatively

Informative essays provide useful information such as facts, examples, and evidence from research in order to help readers understand a topic or see it more clearly. While informative writing does not aim to appeal emotionally to readers in order to change their opinions or behaviors, informative writing should still be engaging to read. Factual information is not necessarily dry or boring. Sometimes facts can be more alarming than fiction!

Writers use various strategies to engage and educate readers. Some strategies include

  • introducing the topic with an alarming fact or arresting image;
  • asserting what is true or so about the subject in a clear thesis statement;
  • organizing the paragraphs logically by grouping related information;
  • unifying each paragraph with a topic sentence and controlling idea;
  • developing cohesive paragraphs with transition sentences;
  • using precise language and terminology appropriate for the topic, purpose, and audience; and
  • concluding with a final idea or example that captures the essay’s purpose and leaves a lasting impression.

Five Steps for Getting Started

1. Brainstorm and choose a topic.

  • Sample topic : The opioid epidemic in the United States.
  • The opiod epidemic or even opiod addiction would would be considered too broad for a single essay, so the next steps aim to narrow this topic down.

2. Next, write a question about the topic that you would like to answer through research.

  • Sample question : What major events caused the opioid crisis in the United States?
  • This question aims to narrow the topic down to causes of the epidemic in the US.

3. Now go to the Purdue Global Library to find the answers to your research question.

As you begin reading and collecting sources, write down the themes that emerge as common answers. Later, in step four, use the most common answers (or the ones you are most interested in writing and discussing) to construct a thesis statement.

  • Sample answers: aggressive marketing, loopholes in prescription drug provider programs, and economic downturn.

4. Next, provide purpose to your paper by creating a thesis statement.

The thesis attempts to frame your research question. The sample thesis below incorporates three of the more common answers for the research question from step two: What caused the opioid crisis in the United States?

  • Thesis Statement : Aggressive marketing, loopholes in prescription drug provider programs, and economic downturn contributed to the current opioid crisis in the United States.
  • Writing Tip : For additional help with thesis statements, please visit our Writing a Thesis Statement article. For help with writing in 3rd person, see our article on Formal Vs. Informal Writing .

5. Now follow each numbered step in the “Suggested Outline Format and Sample” below.

Sample answers have been provided for “I. Introduction” and “II. First Cause.” A complete sample outline can be seen here. A complete sample informative essay can be seen here.

Suggested Outline Format and Sample

I. INTRODUCTION

A. First provide a topic sentence that introduces the main topic: Sample topic sentence : There is a current prescription pain medication addiction and abuse epidemic possibly caused by an excessive over prescription of these medications.

B. Now provide a couple sentences with evidence to support the main topic: Sample sentence one with evidence to support the main topic : According to Dr. Nora Volkow, Director of National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), in testimony before the 115th Congress, “In 2016, over 11 million Americans misused prescription opioids … and 2.1 million had an opioid use disorder due to prescription opioids” (Federal Efforts to Combat the Opioid Crisis, 2017, p. 2).

C. Sample sentence two with evidence to support the main topic : Volkow indicated “more than 300,000 Americans have died of an opioid overdose” since 2013 (Federal Efforts to Combat the Opioid Crisis, 2017, p.2).

D. Sample sentence three with evidence to support the main topic : According to Perez-Pena (2017), the Center for Disease Control and Prevention reported more than 25,000 people in the United States died in 2015 from overdosing on opioids Fentanyl, Oxycodone, and Hydrocodone.

E. Toward the end of the introduction, include your thesis statement written in the 3rd-person point-of-view: Sample thesis statement : Potential solutions to the growing opioid epidemic may be illuminated by examining how opioid addiction is triggered through aggressive pharmaceutical marketing, how opioid addiction manifests among prescribed patients, and how economic downturns play a role in the increase of opioid addiction.

F. Write down the library sources you can use in this introductory paragraph to help support the main topic.

  • Federal Efforts to Combat the Opioid Crisis, 2017
  • Perez-Pena, 2017
  • Writing Tip : For more help writing an introduction, please refer to this article on introductions and conclusions .

II. FIRST CAUSE

A. First provide a topic sentence that introduces the first cause of the opioid epidemic: Sample topic sentence that introduces the first cause : One issue that helped contribute to the opioid epidemic is aggressive marketing by pharmaceutical manufacturers.

B. Now provide sentences with evidence to support the first cause: Sample sentence one with evidence that supports the first cause : Perez-Pena (2017) concluded that while the healthcare industry was attempting to effectively and efficiently treat patients with chronic pain, pharmaceutical companies were providing funding to prominent doctors, medical societies, and patient advocacy groups in order to win support for a particular drug’s adoption and usage.

C. Sample sentence two with evidence to support the first cause : In fact, pharmaceutical companies continue to spend millions on promotional activities and materials that deny or trivialize any risks of opioid use while at the same time overstating each drug’s benefit (Perez-Pina, 2017).

D. Next, add more information or provide concluding or transitional sentences that foreshadows the upcoming second cause: Sample concluding and transitional sentence that foreshadow the second cause : Although aggressive marketing by pharmaceutical companies played a large role in opioid addiction, patients are to blame too, as many take advantage of holes in the healthcare provider system in order to remedy their addiction.

E. Write down the library sources you can use in this body paragraph to help support the first cause:

  • Writing Tip : For more assistance working with sources, please visit the Using Sources page here.

III. SECOND CAUSE

A. First provide a topic sentence that introduces the second cause.

B. Now provide sentences with evidence to support the second cause.

C. Next, add more information or provide concluding or transitional sentences that foreshadows the upcoming third cause.

D. Write down the library sources you can use in this body paragraph to help support the second cause:

  • Writing Tip : Listen to Writing Powerful Sentences for information and features of effective writing.

IV. THIRD CAUSE

A. First provide a topic sentence that introduces the third cause.

B. Now provide sentences with evidence to support the third cause.

C. Next, add more information or provide a concluding sentence or two.

D. Write down the library sources you can use in this body paragraph to help support the third cause:

V. CONCLUSION: Summary of key points and evidence discussed.

  • Writing Tip : For more help writing a conclusion, refer to this podcast on endings .
  • Writing Tip : Have a question? Leave a comment below or Purdue Global students, click here to access the Purdue Global Writing Center tutoring platform and available staff.
  • Writing Tip : Ready to have someone look at your paper? Purdue Global students, click here to submit your assignment for feedback through our video paper review service.

See a Sample Informative Essay Outline here .

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dang bro i got an A

Having faith with all this mentioned, that i will pass my english class at a college. Thank you for posting.

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How to Write a Conclusion

Last Updated: July 15, 2023

Template and Sample Conclusion

This article was co-authored by Christopher Taylor, PhD and by wikiHow staff writer, Danielle Blinka, MA, MPA . Christopher Taylor is an Adjunct Assistant Professor of English at Austin Community College in Texas. He received his PhD in English Literature and Medieval Studies from the University of Texas at Austin in 2014. This article has been viewed 474,733 times.

Writing the introduction and body of a paper is a big accomplishment. Now you need to write your conclusion. Writing a conclusion can feel difficult, but it's easier if you plan ahead. First, format your conclusion by revisiting your thesis, summarizing your arguments, and making a final statement. Then, re-read and revise your conclusion to make it effective.

how to write a conclusion for a informative essay

  • Let’s say your thesis reads, “Allowing students to visit the library during lunch improves campus life and supports academic achievement because it encourages reading, allows students to start assignments early, and provides a refuge for students who eat alone.”
  • You might restate it as, “Evidence shows students who have access to their school’s library during lunch check out more books and are more likely to complete their homework; additionally, students aren’t forced to eat alone.”

Step 2 Summarize your argument in 1-2 sentences.

  • You might write, “According to data, students checked out more books when they were allowed to visit their library during lunch, used that time to do research and ask for help with homework, and reported feeling less alone at lunch time. This shows that opening up the library during lunch can improve student life and academic performance."
  • If you’re writing an argument essay, address the opposing argument, as well. You might write, “Although administrators worry that students will walk the halls instead of going to the library, schools that allow students into the library during lunch reported less behavioral issues during lunch than schools that don’t allow students in the library. Data show that students were spending that time checking out more books and working on homework assignments.” [3] X Trustworthy Source Purdue Online Writing Lab Trusted resource for writing and citation guidelines Go to source

Step 3 End your paper with a statement that makes your reader think.

  • Call your reader to action . For example, “By working with school administrators, Greenlawn ISD can increase academic achievement by letting students use the library during lunch.”
  • End with a warning . You might write, “If students aren’t allowed to use the library during lunch, they are missing out on a valuable learning opportunity they’ll never get back.”
  • Evoke an image . Write, “Next year, students at Greenlawn could be gathered around a table in the library reading or broadening their minds.”
  • Compare your topic to something universal to help your reader relate . You might write, “Everyone knows how stressful it is to have a planner full of assignments, so having extra time to work on them during lunch would be a great relief to many students.”
  • Show why the issue is significant. Write, "Giving students more time to spend in the library will help them become more comfortable spending time there, which also helps the library's mission."
  • Predict what would happen if your ideas are implemented . Say, “Next year, students at Greenlawn could increase their academic achievements, but results will only happen if they can use the library during lunch.”
  • End with a compelling quote . For instance, "As author Roald Dahl once said, 'If you are going to get anywhere in life, you have to read a lot of books.'"

Step 4 Talk to your instructor if you have questions about the assignment.

  • You could also ask your instructor if you can see an example of a well-written conclusion to give you an idea about what they expect you to write.

Step 1 Avoid using introductory phrases like “in conclusion.”

  • If you want to use an introductory phrase, use a stronger one like “based on the evidence” or “ultimately.” You might also begin your first sentence with a word like “although,” “while,” or “since.” [6] X Trustworthy Source University of North Carolina Writing Center UNC's on-campus and online instructional service that provides assistance to students, faculty, and others during the writing process Go to source
  • Additionally, avoid “to conclude,” “in summary,” or “in closing.”

Step 2 Model your conclusion based on your introduction.

  • For example, you may have opened your introduction with an anecdote, quote, or image. Bring it back up in your conclusion. Similarly, if you opened with a rhetorical question, you might offer a potential answer in your conclusion.

Step 3 Include all of your points in your summary, rather than focusing on one.

  • For example, you wouldn’t want to end your essay about allowing students to use the library during lunch by stating, “As the evidence shows, using the library at lunch is a great way to improve student performance because they are more likely to do their homework. On a survey, students reported using the library to do research, ask homework questions, and finish their assignments early.” This leaves out your points about students reading more and having a place to spend their lunch period if they don’t like eating in the cafeteria.

Step 4 Make sure you don’t introduce any new information.

  • If you have introduced something you think is really important for your paper, go back through the body paragraphs and look for somewhere to add it. It’s better to leave it out of the paper than to include it in the conclusion.

Step 5 Proofread

  • If something doesn’t make sense or your conclusion seems incomplete, revise your conclusion so that your ideas are clear.
  • It’s helpful to read your entire paper as a whole to make sure it all comes together.

Community Q&A

Community Answer

  • Don’t put any evidence or statistics in your conclusion. This information belongs in the body of your paper. [11] X Trustworthy Source University of North Carolina Writing Center UNC's on-campus and online instructional service that provides assistance to students, faculty, and others during the writing process Go to source Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0
  • Make sure you aren’t simply repeating what you’ve written earlier. While you want to restate your ideas, present them in a new way for the reader. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Don’t write your conclusion until you’ve written the entire paper. It’ll be much easier to come up with your concluding thoughts after the body of the paper is written. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

how to write a conclusion for a informative essay

  • Never copy someone else’s words or ideas without giving them credit, as this is plagiarism. If you are caught plagiarizing part of your paper, even just the conclusion, you’ll likely face severe academic penalties. Thanks Helpful 5 Not Helpful 2
  • Don’t express any doubts you may have about your ideas or arguments. Whenever you share your ideas, assume the role of expert. [12] X Research source Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0

You Might Also Like

End an Essay

  • ↑ http://writing2.richmond.edu/writing/wweb/conclude.html
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/conclusions/
  • ↑ https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/general_writing/common_writing_assignments/argument_papers/conclusions.html
  • ↑ https://writingcenter.fas.harvard.edu/pages/ending-essay-conclusions

About This Article

Christopher Taylor, PhD

Writing a conclusion can seem difficult, but it’s easier if you think of it as a place to sum up the point of your paper. Begin your conclusion by restating your thesis, but don’t repeat it word-for-word. Then, use 1-2 sentences to summarize your argument, pulling together all of your points to explain how your evidence supports the thesis. End the paper with a statement that makes the reader think, like evoking a strong image or concluding with a call to action. Keep reading for tips on how to avoid cliches in your conclusion! Did this summary help you? Yes No

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How to Write an Informative Essay?

09 May, 2020

15 minutes read

Author:  Tomas White

The bad news is that if you're anything like the majority of students, you're overwhelmed with all kinds of essays your teachers ask you to create. It feels as if they multiply day on day. However, the good news is that here, at HandMade Writing blog, you can find all the answers on how to craft a decent informative essay in no time. So, without further ado, let's dive into the essence of the issue together!

Informative Essay

What is an Informative Essay?

An informative essay is a piece of writing that seeks to inform or explain a subject or topic to educate the reader. When writing an informative essay consider the audience and correspond to their level. Do not over-explain to experts where knowledge can be assumed or under-explain to novices that lack basic understating.

There are in four main categories:

  • To define a term
  • To compare and contrast a subject
  • To analyze data
  • To provide a how-to guide on a subject

An informative paper should be written in an objective tone and avoid the use of the first person.

You may order an informative essay written from scratch at our professional essay writing service – our essay writers are available 24/7.

What is the Purpose of an Informative Essay?

The purpose of an informative essay is to educate the reader by giving them in-depth information and a clear explanation of a subject.  Informative writing should bombard the reader with information and facts that surround an issue. If your reader comes away feeling educated and full of facts about a subject than you have succeeded.

Examples of informative writing are pamphlets, leaflets, brochures, and textbooks. Primarily texts that are used to inform in a neutral manner.

What is the Difference Between an Informative Essay and Expository Essay?

An expository essay and an informative essay are incredibly similar and often confused. A lot of writers class them as the same type of essay. The difference between them is often hazy and contradictory depending on the author’s definition.

In both essays, your purpose is to explain and educate. An expository essay is here to define a single side of an argument or the issue. It’s the first step to writing an argumentative essay through taking the argument on the next level. Informative essays are less complicated. They are just about the information. Such essays generally require less research on a topic, but it all depends on the assignment level and subject. The difference between the two essay types is so subtle that they are almost interchangeable.

How to Plan an Informative Essay Outline

Informative essay outline

Your plan for an informative essay outline should include:

  • Choosing a topic
  • Conducting research
  • Building a thesis statement
  • Planning the structure of introduction
  • Choosing the topic of a body paragraph
  • Forming a satisfying conclusion

By following the list above, you will have a great outline for your informational writing.

Related Post: How to write an Essay outline 

How to Choose an Informative Essay Topic

One of the most difficult tasks when writing is coming up with a topic. Here is some general advice when you are choosing a topic for your essay:

  • Choose a topic that you are interested in. Your interest in writing on the subject will make the essay more engaging.
  • Choose a theme that you know a little about. This way you will be able to find sources and fact easier.
  • Choose a topic that can explain something new or in a different way.
  • Choose a topic that you can support with facts, statistics, and
  • Choose a topic that is relevant to the subject.
  • Remember the four types of categories information essays cover.

Inspiration and Research for Your Ultimate Topic

Your perfect informative essay title can come from numerous sources. Here is where you can potentially seek for relevant topics:

Informative essay topic sources

Not only will they inspire you, but they will also provide with some of the research you need.

Researching an Informative Essay

The best sources should be objective. Some excellent sources for an informative essay include:

Sources for informative essay research

Always remember to check if the source of information will have a bias. For example, a newspaper journalist may have a political leaning, and their article might reflect that. A charities site for motor neuron disease may also come as biased. Analyze the source for the writer’s agenda.

Informational research should answer the five W’s (who, what, where, why and how), and these will form the majority of your essay’s plan. So, if I were writing about the different types of pollution I’d research what kinds of pollution there are, who and how they affect, why they happen, and where they are most likely to occur.

Collating and organizing this information will form your thesis statement and paragraph layout.

Still struggling to find a topic for your informational writing? Then, here are some ideas to that might inspire you.

Examples of Informative Essay Topics for College Students

  • How to avoid stress
  • What ecological problems are we faced with today?
  • What are the effects of obesity?
  • What is cyberbullying?
  • How has the internet changed the world?
  • How to adjust to college life
  • Where to find the best part-time jobs
  • How to get along with your room-mate
  • Guidance on how to write a college application
  • How caffeine affects studying

Examples of Informative Essay Topics for High School

  • How to start your own vegetable garden
  • The reason for and effects of childhood obesity
  • Outline the consequences of texting and driving
  • How to make your favorite food
  • What is climate change? And what are its effects?
  • The different types of pollution
  • The history of the Titanic.
  • An essay on the Great Depression
  • The life and times of Ernst Hemmingway
  • How to have a great vacation
Related Posts: Argumentative essay topics | Research paper topics

Informative Essay Example

When you have finished planning and research, you have to start writing. But, how do you start an informative essay? The simple answer is to just go with it. Do not get overly critical. Just pour out all the information you have. You can shape it up later.

Important points to consider are: never use first person pronouns and keep the topic objective not subjective . Remember, your purpose is to educate the reader in the most thorough way possible by explaining a topic with statistics and facts.

how to write an informative essay

As usual, the essay should include an introduction, main body, and conclusion. All information should be presented in a clear and easy to understand manner. The flow of information should be signposted. We will delve into these areas in more detail now.

Related Post: How to Write a Narrative essay

How to Write an Introduction for an Informative Essay?

An introductory paragraph of an informative essay should comprise of the following things:

A Hook to Ensnare the Reader

An introductory paragraph for informative writing should start with a hook. A hook needs to be in the first sentence and something that will ‘wow’ the reader and impel them to read on. Alarming statistics on the subject/topic make up great hooks for informative essays. For example, if you were writing an essay on cyber-bullying, citing the number of children who have considered suicide due to cyberbullying could be a powerful opening message.

A Thesis Statements for Direction

All introductions should include a thesis statement. The best practice is to place it at the end of the introductory paragraph to summarize your argument.  However, you do not want to form an argument or state a position. It is best to use the thesis statement to clarify what subject you are discussing.

Related Post: What is a thesis statement

It may also be better to place the statement after the hook, as it will clarify the issue that you are discussing.

For example, ‘Research conducted by Bob the Scientist indicates that the majority of issues caused by cyberbullying can be overcome through the informative literature on the subject to educate bullies about the consequences of their actions.’

How to Write the Body of an Informative Essay

Informative essay body paragraphs

When writing the body of an informative paper, it is best to break the paragraph down into four distinct steps.

 The Claim or Statement

The claim or statement is a single, simple sentence that introduces the main topic of the paragraph. It can be narrow or broad depending on the level and depth of the essay. Think of this as the ‘what’ aspect. For example, the claim for a high-school informative paper would be broader than a claim written at the university level. This is the first step to signposting your essay. It provides a logical and easy way to follow a discussion.

The Supporting Evidence

After making a claim you want to back it up with supporting evidence. Supporting evidence could be findings from a survey, the results of an experiment, documented casual effects or a quote. Anything that lends support to the claim or statement in the first sentence would work. This is the ‘why’ aspect of your research. By using supporting evidence like this, you are defining why the statement is essential to the topic.

Explanation

After you state the supporting evidence, you want to explain ‘how’ this finding is important to the subject at hand. That usually unpacks the supporting evidence and makes it easier for the reader to understand. So, an explanation is to explain how this claim and the supporting research affects your thesis statement.

Concluding Sentence

You should always finish a body paragraph with a concluding sentence that ties up the paragraph nicely and prompts the reader on to the next stage. This is a signpost that the topic and the paragraph are wrapped up.

How to Write the Conclusion of an Informative Essay

Writing a conclusion to an informative paper can be hard as there is no argument to conclude – there is only information to summarize. A good conclusion for these types of essays should support the information provided on the subject. It should also explain why these topics are important.

Here are some Tips on writing informative essay conclusions:

Rephrase Your Thesis Statement

It is vital that you rephrase the thesis and not copy it word for word. That will allow you restate the theme or key point of your essay in a new way. You will simultaneously tie your conclusion back to the introduction of your essay. Echoing your introduction will bring the essay full circle.

Read Through Your Body Paragraphs

Read through the body paragraphs of your essay and ask if a brief overview of the main points of the essay would form a good conclusion for the essay. Generally, it is best to restate the main points of the essay in a conclusion using different words.

Finish the Conclusion With a Clincher

A clincher gives your concluding paragraph a powerful finish. It is a sentence that leaves the reader thinking about your essay long after they have put it down.

Some excellent examples of clinchers are:

  • A statement of truth
  • A thought-provoking quote relevant to the subject and thesis statement
  • A lingering question that none of the research has answered or puts the research into a new light
  • Whether it provides an answer to a common question
  • Challenge your reader with a quote from an expert that forces them to think about or change their own behavior
  • Something that shifts the focus onto the future and the long-time implications of your research

Context and Significance of the Information

A conclusion should always try to frame why the topic was important, and in what context it was important. By doing this your research matters.

Remember: A concluding paragraph should never include new information.

Informative Essay Sample

Be sure to check the sample essay, completed by our writers. Use it as an example to write your own informative paper. Link:  Tesla motors

Tips for Writing an Excellent Informative Essay

Here are a few tips for writing an informative paper

  • When writing the main body paragraph, concentrate on explaining information only once. Avoid repeating the same information in the next section.
  • Focus on the subject. Make sure all the information that you include is relevant to the topic you are describing. Do not include information that “goes off.”
  • Write in a logical way that is signposted. Writing like this will make an essay flow and mean it is easier to understand.
  • Always revise the essay at least three times. This way, you will find where to expand ideas in the paragraph, where to trim back ideas until everything has the right balance.
  • Be familiar with the academic reference style you are writing in
  • Write to your audience. Make sure you know who you are writing it for.

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logo that says helpful professor with a mortarboard hat picture next to it

17 Essay Conclusion Examples (Copy and Paste)

essay conclusion examples and definition, explained below

Essay conclusions are not just extra filler. They are important because they tie together your arguments, then give you the chance to forcefully drive your point home.

I created the 5 Cs conclusion method to help you write essay conclusions:

Essay Conclusion Example

I’ve previously produced the video below on how to write a conclusion that goes over the above image.

The video follows the 5 C’s method ( you can read about it in this post ), which doesn’t perfectly match each of the below copy-and-paste conclusion examples, but the principles are similar, and can help you to write your own strong conclusion:

💡 New! Try this AI Prompt to Generate a Sample 5Cs Conclusion This is my essay: [INSERT ESSAY WITHOUT THE CONCLUSION]. I want you to write a conclusion for this essay. In the first sentence of the conclusion, return to a statement I made in the introduction. In the second sentence, reiterate the thesis statement I have used. In the third sentence, clarify how my final position is relevant to the Essay Question, which is [ESSAY QUESTION]. In the fourth sentence, explain who should be interested in my findings. In the fifth sentence, end by noting in one final, engaging sentence why this topic is of such importance.

Remember: The prompt can help you generate samples but you can’t submit AI text for assessment. Make sure you write your conclusion in your own words.

Essay Conclusion Examples

Below is a range of copy-and-paste essay conclusions with gaps for you to fill-in your topic and key arguments. Browse through for one you like (there are 17 for argumentative, expository, compare and contrast, and critical essays). Once you’ve found one you like, copy it and add-in the key points to make it your own.

1. Argumentative Essay Conclusions

The arguments presented in this essay demonstrate the significant importance of _____________. While there are some strong counterarguments, such as ____________, it remains clear that the benefits/merits of _____________ far outweigh the potential downsides. The evidence presented throughout the essay strongly support _____________. In the coming years, _____________ will be increasingly important. Therefore, continual advocacy for the position presented in this essay will be necessary, especially due to its significant implications for _____________.

Version 1 Filled-In

The arguments presented in this essay demonstrate the significant importance of fighting climate change. While there are some strong counterarguments, such as the claim that it is too late to stop catastrophic change, it remains clear that the merits of taking drastic action far outweigh the potential downsides. The evidence presented throughout the essay strongly support the claim that we can at least mitigate the worst effects. In the coming years, intergovernmental worldwide agreements will be increasingly important. Therefore, continual advocacy for the position presented in this essay will be necessary, especially due to its significant implications for humankind.

chris

As this essay has shown, it is clear that the debate surrounding _____________ is multifaceted and highly complex. While there are strong arguments opposing the position that _____________, there remains overwhelming evidence to support the claim that _____________. A careful analysis of the empirical evidence suggests that _____________ not only leads to ____________, but it may also be a necessity for _____________. Moving forward, _____________ should be a priority for all stakeholders involved, as it promises a better future for _____________. The focus should now shift towards how best to integrate _____________ more effectively into society.

Version 2 Filled-In

As this essay has shown, it is clear that the debate surrounding climate change is multifaceted and highly complex. While there are strong arguments opposing the position that we should fight climate change, there remains overwhelming evidence to support the claim that action can mitigate the worst effects. A careful analysis of the empirical evidence suggests that strong action not only leads to better economic outcomes in the long term, but it may also be a necessity for preventing climate-related deaths. Moving forward, carbon emission mitigation should be a priority for all stakeholders involved, as it promises a better future for all. The focus should now shift towards how best to integrate smart climate policies more effectively into society.

Based upon the preponderance of evidence, it is evident that _____________ holds the potential to significantly alter/improve _____________. The counterarguments, while noteworthy, fail to diminish the compelling case for _____________. Following an examination of both sides of the argument, it has become clear that _____________ presents the most effective solution/approach to _____________. Consequently, it is imperative that society acknowledge the value of _____________ for developing a better  _____________. Failing to address this topic could lead to negative outcomes, including _____________.

Version 3 Filled-In

Based upon the preponderance of evidence, it is evident that addressing climate change holds the potential to significantly improve the future of society. The counterarguments, while noteworthy, fail to diminish the compelling case for immediate climate action. Following an examination of both sides of the argument, it has become clear that widespread and urgent social action presents the most effective solution to this pressing problem. Consequently, it is imperative that society acknowledge the value of taking immediate action for developing a better environment for future generations. Failing to address this topic could lead to negative outcomes, including more extreme climate events and greater economic externalities.

See Also: Examples of Counterarguments

On the balance of evidence, there is an overwhelming case for _____________. While the counterarguments offer valid points that are worth examining, they do not outweigh or overcome the argument that _____________. An evaluation of both perspectives on this topic concludes that _____________ is the most sufficient option for  _____________. The implications of embracing _____________ do not only have immediate benefits, but they also pave the way for a more _____________. Therefore, the solution of _____________ should be actively pursued by _____________.

Version 4 Filled-In

On the balance of evidence, there is an overwhelming case for immediate tax-based action to mitigate the effects of climate change. While the counterarguments offer valid points that are worth examining, they do not outweigh or overcome the argument that action is urgently necessary. An evaluation of both perspectives on this topic concludes that taking societal-wide action is the most sufficient option for  achieving the best results. The implications of embracing a society-wide approach like a carbon tax do not only have immediate benefits, but they also pave the way for a more healthy future. Therefore, the solution of a carbon tax or equivalent policy should be actively pursued by governments.

2. Expository Essay Conclusions

Overall, it is evident that _____________ plays a crucial role in _____________. The analysis presented in this essay demonstrates the clear impact of _____________ on _____________. By understanding the key facts about _____________, practitioners/society are better equipped to navigate _____________. Moving forward, further exploration of _____________ will yield additional insights and information about _____________. As such, _____________ should remain a focal point for further discussions and studies on _____________.

Overall, it is evident that social media plays a crucial role in harming teenagers’ mental health. The analysis presented in this essay demonstrates the clear impact of social media on young people. By understanding the key facts about the ways social media cause young people to experience body dysmorphia, teachers and parents are better equipped to help young people navigate online spaces. Moving forward, further exploration of the ways social media cause harm will yield additional insights and information about how it can be more sufficiently regulated. As such, the effects of social media on youth should remain a focal point for further discussions and studies on youth mental health.

To conclude, this essay has explored the multi-faceted aspects of _____________. Through a careful examination of _____________, this essay has illuminated its significant influence on _____________. This understanding allows society to appreciate the idea that _____________. As research continues to emerge, the importance of _____________ will only continue to grow. Therefore, an understanding of _____________ is not merely desirable, but imperative for _____________.

To conclude, this essay has explored the multi-faceted aspects of globalization. Through a careful examination of globalization, this essay has illuminated its significant influence on the economy, cultures, and society. This understanding allows society to appreciate the idea that globalization has both positive and negative effects. As research continues to emerge, the importance of studying globalization will only continue to grow. Therefore, an understanding of globalization’s effects is not merely desirable, but imperative for judging whether it is good or bad.

Reflecting on the discussion, it is clear that _____________ serves a pivotal role in _____________. By delving into the intricacies of _____________, we have gained valuable insights into its impact and significance. This knowledge will undoubtedly serve as a guiding principle in _____________. Moving forward, it is paramount to remain open to further explorations and studies on _____________. In this way, our understanding and appreciation of _____________ can only deepen and expand.

Reflecting on the discussion, it is clear that mass media serves a pivotal role in shaping public opinion. By delving into the intricacies of mass media, we have gained valuable insights into its impact and significance. This knowledge will undoubtedly serve as a guiding principle in shaping the media landscape. Moving forward, it is paramount to remain open to further explorations and studies on how mass media impacts society. In this way, our understanding and appreciation of mass media’s impacts can only deepen and expand.

In conclusion, this essay has shed light on the importance of _____________ in the context of _____________. The evidence and analysis provided underscore the profound effect _____________ has on _____________. The knowledge gained from exploring _____________ will undoubtedly contribute to more informed and effective decisions in _____________. As we continue to progress, the significance of understanding _____________ will remain paramount. Hence, we should strive to deepen our knowledge of _____________ to better navigate and influence _____________.

In conclusion, this essay has shed light on the importance of bedside manner in the context of nursing. The evidence and analysis provided underscore the profound effect compassionate bedside manner has on patient outcome. The knowledge gained from exploring nurses’ bedside manner will undoubtedly contribute to more informed and effective decisions in nursing practice. As we continue to progress, the significance of understanding nurses’ bedside manner will remain paramount. Hence, we should strive to deepen our knowledge of this topic to better navigate and influence patient outcomes.

See More: How to Write an Expository Essay

3. Compare and Contrast Essay Conclusion

While both _____________ and _____________ have similarities such as _____________, they also have some very important differences in areas like _____________. Through this comparative analysis, a broader understanding of _____________ and _____________ has been attained. The choice between the two will largely depend on _____________. For example, as highlighted in the essay, ____________. Despite their differences, both _____________ and _____________ have value in different situations.

While both macrosociology and microsociology have similarities such as their foci on how society is structured, they also have some very important differences in areas like their differing approaches to research methodologies. Through this comparative analysis, a broader understanding of macrosociology and microsociology has been attained. The choice between the two will largely depend on the researcher’s perspective on how society works. For example, as highlighted in the essay, microsociology is much more concerned with individuals’ experiences while macrosociology is more concerned with social structures. Despite their differences, both macrosociology and microsociology have value in different situations.

It is clear that _____________ and _____________, while seeming to be different, have shared characteristics in _____________. On the other hand, their contrasts in _____________ shed light on their unique features. The analysis provides a more nuanced comprehension of these subjects. In choosing between the two, consideration should be given to _____________. Despite their disparities, it’s crucial to acknowledge the importance of both when it comes to _____________.

It is clear that behaviorism and consructivism, while seeming to be different, have shared characteristics in their foci on knowledge acquisition over time. On the other hand, their contrasts in ideas about the role of experience in learning shed light on their unique features. The analysis provides a more nuanced comprehension of these subjects. In choosing between the two, consideration should be given to which approach works best in which situation. Despite their disparities, it’s crucial to acknowledge the importance of both when it comes to student education.

Reflecting on the points discussed, it’s evident that _____________ and _____________ share similarities such as _____________, while also demonstrating unique differences, particularly in _____________. The preference for one over the other would typically depend on factors such as _____________. Yet, regardless of their distinctions, both _____________ and _____________ play integral roles in their respective areas, significantly contributing to _____________.

Reflecting on the points discussed, it’s evident that red and orange share similarities such as the fact they are both ‘hot colors’, while also demonstrating unique differences, particularly in their social meaning (red meaning danger and orange warmth). The preference for one over the other would typically depend on factors such as personal taste. Yet, regardless of their distinctions, both red and orange play integral roles in their respective areas, significantly contributing to color theory.

Ultimately, the comparison and contrast of _____________ and _____________ have revealed intriguing similarities and notable differences. Differences such as _____________ give deeper insights into their unique and shared qualities. When it comes to choosing between them, _____________ will likely be a deciding factor. Despite these differences, it is important to remember that both _____________ and _____________ hold significant value within the context of _____________, and each contributes to _____________ in its own unique way.

Ultimately, the comparison and contrast of driving and flying have revealed intriguing similarities and notable differences. Differences such as their differing speed to destination give deeper insights into their unique and shared qualities. When it comes to choosing between them, urgency to arrive at the destination will likely be a deciding factor. Despite these differences, it is important to remember that both driving and flying hold significant value within the context of air transit, and each contributes to facilitating movement in its own unique way.

See Here for More Compare and Contrast Essay Examples

4. Critical Essay Conclusion

In conclusion, the analysis of _____________ has unveiled critical aspects related to _____________. While there are strengths in _____________, its limitations are equally telling. This critique provides a more informed perspective on _____________, revealing that there is much more beneath the surface. Moving forward, the understanding of _____________ should evolve, considering both its merits and flaws.

In conclusion, the analysis of flow theory has unveiled critical aspects related to motivation and focus. While there are strengths in achieving a flow state, its limitations are equally telling. This critique provides a more informed perspective on how humans achieve motivation, revealing that there is much more beneath the surface. Moving forward, the understanding of flow theory of motivation should evolve, considering both its merits and flaws.

To conclude, this critical examination of _____________ sheds light on its multi-dimensional nature. While _____________ presents notable advantages, it is not without its drawbacks. This in-depth critique offers a comprehensive understanding of _____________. Therefore, future engagements with _____________ should involve a balanced consideration of its strengths and weaknesses.

To conclude, this critical examination of postmodern art sheds light on its multi-dimensional nature. While postmodernism presents notable advantages, it is not without its drawbacks. This in-depth critique offers a comprehensive understanding of how it has contributed to the arts over the past 50 years. Therefore, future engagements with postmodern art should involve a balanced consideration of its strengths and weaknesses.

Upon reflection, the critique of _____________ uncovers profound insights into its underlying intricacies. Despite its positive aspects such as ________, it’s impossible to overlook its shortcomings. This analysis provides a nuanced understanding of _____________, highlighting the necessity for a balanced approach in future interactions. Indeed, both the strengths and weaknesses of _____________ should be taken into account when considering ____________.

Upon reflection, the critique of marxism uncovers profound insights into its underlying intricacies. Despite its positive aspects such as its ability to critique exploitation of labor, it’s impossible to overlook its shortcomings. This analysis provides a nuanced understanding of marxism’s harmful effects when used as an economic theory, highlighting the necessity for a balanced approach in future interactions. Indeed, both the strengths and weaknesses of marxism should be taken into account when considering the use of its ideas in real life.

Ultimately, this critique of _____________ offers a detailed look into its advantages and disadvantages. The strengths of _____________ such as __________ are significant, yet its limitations such as _________ are not insignificant. This balanced analysis not only offers a deeper understanding of _____________ but also underscores the importance of critical evaluation. Hence, it’s crucial that future discussions around _____________ continue to embrace this balanced approach.

Ultimately, this critique of artificial intelligence offers a detailed look into its advantages and disadvantages. The strengths of artificial intelligence, such as its ability to improve productivity are significant, yet its limitations such as the possibility of mass job losses are not insignificant. This balanced analysis not only offers a deeper understanding of artificial intelligence but also underscores the importance of critical evaluation. Hence, it’s crucial that future discussions around the regulation of artificial intelligence continue to embrace this balanced approach.

This article promised 17 essay conclusions, and this one you are reading now is the twenty-first. This last conclusion demonstrates that the very best essay conclusions are written uniquely, from scratch, in order to perfectly cater the conclusion to the topic. A good conclusion will tie together all the key points you made in your essay and forcefully drive home the importance or relevance of your argument, thesis statement, or simply your topic so the reader is left with one strong final point to ponder.

Chris

Chris Drew (PhD)

Dr. Chris Drew is the founder of the Helpful Professor. He holds a PhD in education and has published over 20 articles in scholarly journals. He is the former editor of the Journal of Learning Development in Higher Education. [Image Descriptor: Photo of Chris]

  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 50 Durable Goods Examples
  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 100 Consumer Goods Examples
  • Chris Drew (PhD) https://helpfulprofessor.com/author/chris-drew-phd/ 30 Globalization Pros and Cons
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how to write a conclusion for a informative essay

How to Write an Informative Essay: Everything You Need to Know

how to write a conclusion for a informative essay

Did you know that informative essays are not limited to academic settings? While they are commonly assigned in schools and universities, informative essays also have practical applications in various professional fields. Industries such as journalism, marketing, and public relations often utilize this type of writing to communicate complex ideas, educate the public, and promote products or services. This demonstrates the versatile nature of informative essays and their ability to convey valuable information beyond the classroom setting.

So, if you are looking to write an informative essay, congratulations! You have chosen a genre that is not only interesting but also quite challenging. To ensure the success of your essay, according to our essay writer , you must invest time and effort into thoughtful planning, thorough research, and effective organization. It's key to maintain a balanced tone, provide clear and concise information, and incorporate your own analysis to make your essay stand out.

Short Description

Throughout this comprehensive guide, we will explore the definition and purpose of informative essays, highlighting the reasons why you should embrace the art of crafting one. Furthermore, we will provide valuable insights on how to commence and organize your own informative essay format effectively. Without further ado, let us embark on this enriching journey!

What is an Informative Essay: Unraveling the Essence

Informative writing aims to educate readers about a specific topic by presenting accurate and objective information. Whether used in academic settings or published in magazines and online platforms, informative essay examples cover a wide range of subjects and require thorough research and credible sources. This type of essay follows a structured format and considers the intended audience to ensure clarity and engagement. Here are some important facts from our admission essay writing service you should know about this kind of paper:

What is an Informative Essay

  • They are designed to educate or inform readers about a particular topic.
  • The emphasis is on presenting accurate, objective facts and information.
  • They can cover various subjects, from science and technology to literature, history, and culture.
  • They are commonly used in academic settings but can also be found in magazines, newspapers, and online publications.
  • The essays rely on verifiable facts and require extensive research and credible sources.
  • Personal opinions and biases should be avoided to maintain credibility.
  • The essay structure includes an introduction with background information and a clear thesis statement, a body presenting main points and supporting evidence, and a conclusion summarizing the information.
  • The language and tone should be appropriate for the target audience.
  • The level of detail should be adjusted based on the audience's knowledge of the topic.

Reasons to Write an Informative Essay

Writing an informative essay, whether in an IEEE format or any other style, offers an opportunity to share expertise, educate others, and shed light on lesser-known topics. Whether driven by passion, a desire to showcase expertise or a quest for spreading awareness, there are compelling reasons to embark on this writing journey:

  • Share knowledge : Understanding how to write an informative essay allows you to impart knowledge about a specific field or subject. As an expert in psychology, for instance, you could enlighten readers about theories of personality or the impact of stress on mental health. By sharing your expertise, you contribute to increased understanding and awareness of significant issues.
  • Demonstrate expertise : If you are a professional in a particular field like medicine or law, writing this kind of paper provides a platform to showcase your expertise. By articulating your knowledge and skills, you can establish credibility not only within your field but also among the general public.
  • Unveil the unknown : It can be an effective means to present information that is not widely known or understood. For instance, you might delve into a lesser-known historical event or a scientific discovery that has yet to receive widespread attention. By unveiling such knowledge to your readers, you contribute to raising awareness and fostering understanding of significant topics.

How to Start an Informative Essay: Effective Strategies

Are you feeling overwhelmed by the thought of how to write an informative essay? Don't worry; you're not alone! Many students struggle with getting started on their writing assignments. You can either order essay or, with a few helpful tips, you can tackle this task with confidence and ease.

Start an Informative Essay

  • Choose an engaging topic : Select a topic that genuinely interests you, as it will make the writing process more enjoyable and engaging. Additionally, choose a topic you have some knowledge about to write with authority and credibility.
  • Conduct thorough research : Invest time in researching your chosen topic to gather the necessary information for a compelling and essay. Use reputable sources and take detailed notes to ensure accuracy.
  • Determine the purpose of your essay : Clarify the purpose of your essay. Are you explaining a complex concept, analyzing a problem, or comparing and contrasting ideas? Knowing the purpose will help you stay focused and organized throughout the writing process.
  • Create an outline : Use an outline to organize your thoughts and information. Include an introduction, body paragraphs, and a conclusion. This structure of an informative essay will provide a clear framework for your paper and make the writing process smoother.

Informative Essay Outline

Many students overlook the importance of creating an outline, yet it serves as a valuable tool for directing research and organizing the structure and flow of an essay. By investing a little more time in crafting an outline, you can significantly reduce the time spent on the actual writing process. To assist you, here is a sample informational essay format from our term paper writing services that can serve as a helpful guide:

I. Introduction

A. Hook or attention-grabbing statement

B. Background information on the topic

C. Informative essay thesis statement that states the main focus of the essay

II. Body Paragraphs

A. Main Idea 1

1. Supporting evidence or facts related to Main Idea 1

2. Explanation or analysis of the supporting evidence

3. Transition sentence to the next paragraph

B. Main Idea 2

1. Supporting evidence or facts related to Main Idea 2

C. Main Idea 3

1. Supporting evidence or facts related to Main Idea 3

III. Conclusion

A. Restate the thesis statement

B. Summarize the main points discussed in the body paragraphs

C. Closing thoughts or final remarks to leave a lasting impression

IV. Optional: Additional Sections

A. Counter Arguments and refutations (if necessary)

B. Further research or recommendations for further reading

C. Personal reflections or real-life examples (if applicable)

Informative Essay Structure

Now that you have an outline and know how to start an essay , it's important to understand how to structure your essay with further elaboration:

  • Introduction : When it comes to writing an informative essay, the first step is to choose a topic that is interesting and relevant to your audience. You should also do some research to gather information and facts that will support your thesis statement. Once you have a clear understanding of your topic, you can start writing your introduction. Your informative essay introduction should provide some background information about your topic and end with a thesis statement that summarizes the main points of your essay.
  • Body Paragraphs : Each body paragraph should focus on a main point and provide evidence to support it. Use examples, statistics, and quotes to strengthen your argument. For example, if you are writing an essay about the benefits of exercise, your first body paragraph could focus on the physical benefits of exercise, such as weight loss, increased muscle mass, and improved cardiovascular health. You could provide evidence from scientific studies or expert opinions to support your argument.
  • Conclusion : Summarize the main points of your essay and provide a concluding thought. Avoid introducing new information in your conclusion. For example, if you are writing about the benefits of exercise, your conclusion should summarize the physical, mental, and social benefits of exercise and encourage your reader to start an exercise routine for a healthier and happier life.

Informative Essay Topics

When writing an informative essay, topic selection is a task more challenging than it may initially appear. Since the objective of such an essay is to provide information about a subject, almost any topic can serve as a suitable choice. However, it is crucial to avoid hastily diving into the first topic that comes to mind. Instead, dedicate time to brainstorming multiple options and conducting preliminary research on each of them. To narrow down a good topic, consider the following guidelines:

How to Choose informative essay topics

  • Avoid excessive breadth : Ensure that the topic is not too broad to allow for a comprehensive explanation within the essay.
  • Steer clear of excessive specificity : Similarly, avoid selecting a topic that lacks substantial information, as it may hinder your ability to present a well-supported essay.
  • Appeal to the audience : Choose a topic that is interesting and relevant to your target audience, as this will captivate their attention and enhance the overall quality of your essay.
  • Personal interest : Opt for a topic that personally intrigues you. When you find the subject matter fascinating, it becomes easier to engage in the research and writing process.
  • Significance of the topic : Ensure that your chosen topic addresses something important, as this will contribute to the overall value and relevance of your essay.

Take sufficient time to generate a strong topic. If you encounter difficulties, consider reviewing some examples to understand the type of information you need to find. Additionally, you can refer to a list of topics for inspiration.

10 History Topics

  • Recounting a Cherished Era: Reflections on a Favorite Period in History.
  • Unveiling the Origins of the English Language: Tracing its Linguistic Development.
  • Unraveling Your Family Tree: An In-depth Analysis of Ancestral Lineage.
  • Echoes of the Ancient Egyptians: Exploring the Auditory Landscape of a Bygone Civilization.
  • Timekeeping Techniques of Ancient Civilizations: Examining Methods and Instruments.
  • Shifting Perspectives: Three Formerly Acceptable Norms Now Regarded as Iniquitous.
  • Tracing the Fascinating History of a European Royal Family.
  • Pre-European Africa: A Glimpse into the Continent's Precolonial Era.
  • The Significance of the Silk Trade Route: Examining its Historical, Economic, and Cultural Impacts.
  • Connecting the Dots: How the Last Mass Extinction Event Paved the Way for Mammalian Dominance.

10 Business Topics

  • Examining the Detrimental Environmental Effects of Global Supply Chains: Three Key Reasons.
  • Unlocking Social Media Marketing Success: Effective Strategies for Maximum Impact.
  • Navigating Entrepreneurship: Identifying the Major Challenges of Starting a Small Business.
  • The Ripple Effect: Exploring the Influence of Government Policy Changes on Business Decision-Making.
  • Expanding Horizons: A Guide to Introducing a Product to a New Market.
  • The Rising Value of Data and Information: Exploring their Transformation into Commodities.
  • Unveiling the Long-Term Implications of Cryptocurrency: Examining its Lasting Impact.
  • The Advantages of Bartering: Assessing the Benefits of the Ancient Trading System.
  • Diverse Regulations: Understanding the Variances in Child Labor Laws Among Countries.
  • Spotting Business Opportunities: Key Strategies for Identifying and Capitalizing on Potential Ventures.

10 Social Topics

  • Addressing the Social Stigma of Mental Disorders: Steps Towards Promoting Understanding and Acceptance.
  • Unveiling the Evolution of Media Censorship: A Historical Perspective.
  • The Impact of Geographic Location on Life Opportunities: Exploring the Connection.
  • The Significance of Jane Goodall: Contributions to Conservation and Primatology.
  • The Phenomenon of Snap Judgments: Understanding the Quickness to Judge Others.
  • Gaining Insights into Humanity through Animal Observation: Lessons from Non-Human Behavior.
  • Unraveling the Effects of the Pandemic on the World's Wealthiest Individuals.
  • Making an Impact: Effective Approaches to Donating for Charitable Causes.
  • Combating Bullying in Schools: Promoting Effective Strategies and Interventions.
  • The Influence of Social Media on Loneliness: Examining the Connection and Implications.

10 Political Topics

  • The French Revolution: Paving the Way for Contemporary Democracy.
  • Exploring the Factors Behind the Increased Political Polarization Worldwide.
  • Understanding China's Rapid Expansion: Key Drivers and Implications.
  • Weighing the Pros and Cons of Different Political Systems.
  • Bridging the Divide: Initiating Conversations with Individuals from Differing Perspectives.
  • Navigating the Path to the Presidency: Steps Towards Becoming the Leader of the United States.
  • Assessing the Ramifications of Another World War on Global Dynamics.
  • Contrasting Liberalism and Conservatism: Key Differentiating Factors.
  • The Ripple Effect: How Elections in a Neighboring Country Impact Your Nation.
  • Portrait of a Political Luminary: Examining the Life and Contributions of an Influential Leader.

10 Education Topics

  • Exploring the Advantages and Disadvantages of Standardized Testing.
  • Enhancing Memory: Strategies to Improve Cognitive Recall.
  • Unveiling the Advantages of Mentor Programs for Personal and Professional Development.
  • The Transformative Power of Higher Education: How Universities Enhance Lives.
  • Empowering Student Choice: The Importance of Allowing Students to Select Their Subjects.
  • Contrasting Educational Systems: A Comparative Analysis of Schooling Approaches Worldwide.
  • Conquering the Toughest Tests: A Look at the Most Challenging Examinations Globally.
  • Bridging the Gap: The Role of Education in Reducing Social Inequality.
  • Crafting an Academic Essay: Guidelines and Tips for Effective Writing.
  • The Vital Role of Restful Sleep in Exam Preparation and Performance.

Ready to Ignite Minds with Your Informative Essay?

Our qualified writers are here to craft a masterpiece tailored to your needs worthy of an A+

Informative Essay Examples

Essay examples are invaluable resources that demonstrate the skill of translating theoretical concepts into practical applications with effectiveness and engagement. By examining the below well-crafted essays, you gain insights into how to write an informative essay with proper structure, organization, and presentation techniques!

Meanwhile, you can also explore essay writing apps that enable you to work on your upcoming assignments anytime and anywhere, providing convenience and flexibility to enhance your writing process.

EssayPro is the best custom essay writing service on the web, as we always hire qualified paper writers to create high-level content for very fair prices.

Final Remarks

Congratulations! You are now equipped with the knowledge to craft an outstanding paper. This comprehensive guide has provided essential insights, including understanding the essence of informative essay writing, selecting an engaging topic, constructing a well-structured outline, and step-by-step instructions for composing each paragraph. Additionally, valuable tips and general advice have been shared to enhance your writing journey. By following the guidance provided, you are bound to embark on a fulfilling, informative writing experience, allowing you to share compelling information about a subject close to your heart.

Want to Unleash the Brilliance of Your Ideas?

Claim your expertly crafted informative essay today and command attention with your brilliant insights!

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Satire Essay

Informative Essay — Purpose, Structure, and Examples

Daniel Bal

What is informative writing?

Informative writing educates the reader about a certain topic. An informative essay may explain new information, describe a process, or clarify a concept. The provided information is objective, meaning the writing focuses on presentation of fact and should not contain personal opinion or bias.

Informative writing includes description, process, cause and effect, comparison, and problems and possible solutions:

Describes a person, place, thing, or event using descriptive language that appeals to readers’ senses

Explains the process to do something or how something was created

Discusses the relationship between two things, determining how one ( cause ) leads to the other ( effect ); the effect needs to be based on fact and not an assumption

Identifies the similarities and differences between two things; does not indicate that one is better than the other

Details a problem and presents various possible solutions ; the writer does not suggest one solution is more effective than the others

What is informative writing?

Purpose of informative writing

The purpose of an informative essay depends upon the writer’s motivation, but may be to share new information, describe a process, clarify a concept, explain why or how, or detail a topic’s intricacies.

Informative essays may introduce readers to new information .

Summarizing a scientific/technological study

Outlining the various aspects of a religion

Providing information on a historical period

Describe a process or give step-by-step details of a procedure.

How to write an informational essay

How to construct an argument

How to apply for a job

Clarify a concept and offer details about complex ideas.

Purpose of informative essays

Explain why or how something works the way that it does.

Describe how the stock market impacts the economy

Illustrate why there are high and low tides

Detail how the heart functions

Offer information on the smaller aspects or intricacies of a larger topic.

Identify the importance of the individual bones in the body

Outlining the Dust Bowl in the context of the Great Depression

Explaining how bees impact the environment

How to write an informative essay

Regardless of the type of information, the informative essay structure typically consists of an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Introduction

Background information

Explanation of evidence

Restated thesis

Review of main ideas

Closing statement

Informative essay structure

Informative essay introduction

When composing the introductory paragraph(s) of an informative paper, include a hook, introduce the topic, provide background information, and develop a good thesis statement.

If the hook or introduction creates interest in the first paragraph, it will draw the readers’ attention and make them more receptive to the essay writer's ideas. Some of the most common techniques to accomplish this include the following:

Emphasize the topic’s importance by explaining the current interest in the topic or by indicating that the subject is influential.

Use pertinent statistics to give the paper an air of authority.

A surprising statement can be shocking; sometimes it is disgusting; sometimes it is joyful; sometimes it is surprising because of who said it.

An interesting incident or anecdote can act as a teaser to lure the reader into the remainder of the essay. Be sure that the device is appropriate for the informative essay topic and focus on what is to follow.

Informative essay hooks

Directly introduce the topic of the essay.

Provide the reader with the background information necessary to understand the topic. Don’t repeat this information in the body of the essay; it should help the reader understand what follows.

Identify the overall purpose of the essay with the thesis (purpose statement). Writers can also include their support directly in the thesis, which outlines the structure of the essay for the reader.

Informative essay body paragraphs

Each body paragraph should contain a topic sentence, evidence, explanation of evidence, and a transition sentence.

Informative essay body paragraphs

A good topic sentence should identify what information the reader should expect in the paragraph and how it connects to the main purpose identified in the thesis.

Provide evidence that details the main point of the paragraph. This includes paraphrasing, summarizing, and directly quoting facts, statistics, and statements.

Explain how the evidence connects to the main purpose of the essay.

Place transitions at the end of each body paragraph, except the last. There is no need to transition from the last support to the conclusion. A transition should accomplish three goals:

Tell the reader where you were (current support)

Tell the reader where you are going (next support)

Relate the paper’s purpose

Informative essay conclusion

Incorporate a rephrased thesis, summary, and closing statement into the conclusion of an informative essay.

Rephrase the purpose of the essay. Do not just repeat the purpose statement from the thesis.

Summarize the main idea found in each body paragraph by rephrasing each topic sentence.

End with a clincher or closing statement that helps readers answer the question “so what?” What should the reader take away from the information provided in the essay? Why should they care about the topic?

Informative essay example

The following example illustrates a good informative essay format:

Informative essay format

How to Close an Informative Essay

Kristina barroso, 25 jun 2018.

How to Close an Informative Essay

Whether you love or hate them, essays are a necessary evil within the educational community, so you can bet that you’ll have to write a variety of them throughout your academic career. Rather than bemoan this reality, you can learn strategies to improve your writing skills and tackle those essays head on with confidence. Informative essays, like most other essays, have three main components: an introduction, body paragraphs and a conclusion. The conclusion may be the last thing you write, but it deserves just as much effort and attention as the rest of your essay.

Explore this article

  • Purpose of an Informative Essay
  • Purpose of a Conclusion for an Informative Essay
  • Prepare to Write Your Conclusion
  • Write Your Conclusion

1 Purpose of an Informative Essay

As you might have guessed, the purpose of an informative essay is to provide information on a given topic. A well-written informative essay will educate the reader on its topic through thorough explanation and use of evidence and examples to support the information. Opinion has no place in an informative essay. All the information presented must be sufficiently backed up with evidence from legitimate sources. The writing style for an informative essay should be objective and avoid the use of first person pronouns.

2 Purpose of a Conclusion for an Informative Essay

Writing the conclusion for your informative essay is just as important as the introduction. The conclusion is the last thing your reader will read about your topic, which is why it needs to pack a powerful punch to make it relevant and memorable. The goal of your conclusion should be to eloquently summarize the content of your essay, but you should aim to do so in a way that the reader is likely to remember.

3 Prepare to Write Your Conclusion

A little bit of brainstorming often goes a long way. Before you jump right into writing your conclusion, take a moment to question the content of your essay. Why is the information you presented important? Your conclusion should include a clear answer to that question. Once you’ve identified what is meaningful about your essay’s content, make a list that highlights all its key ideas so that you don’t leave any out of your conclusion. Finally, reread your introduction and look for any themes you may have mentioned there that you could reiterate in the conclusion.

4 Write Your Conclusion

The conclusion should be short and sweet, so keep it to no more than five to seven sentences in length. Take the topic sentences from each of your body paragraphs and restate them in a new way to create a summary of your essay’s content. Next, take the thesis statement from your introduction and try to say the same thing in a new and interesting way. Finally, wrap up your conclusion with an authoritative sentence that effectively summarizes the main point of the whole thing.

  • 1 Literacy Education Online: Strategies for Writing a Conclusion
  • 2 A Research Guide: How to Write an Informative Essay

About the Author

Kristina Barroso earned a B.A. in Psychology from Florida International University and works full-time as a classroom teacher in a public school. She teaches middle school English to a wide range of students from struggling readers to advanced and gifted populations. In her spare time, she loves writing articles about education for TheClassroom.com, WorkingMother and other education sites.

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Writing a Research Paper Conclusion | Step-by-Step Guide

Published on October 30, 2022 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on April 13, 2023.

  • Restate the problem statement addressed in the paper
  • Summarize your overall arguments or findings
  • Suggest the key takeaways from your paper

Research paper conclusion

The content of the conclusion varies depending on whether your paper presents the results of original empirical research or constructs an argument through engagement with sources .

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Table of contents

Step 1: restate the problem, step 2: sum up the paper, step 3: discuss the implications, research paper conclusion examples, frequently asked questions about research paper conclusions.

The first task of your conclusion is to remind the reader of your research problem . You will have discussed this problem in depth throughout the body, but now the point is to zoom back out from the details to the bigger picture.

While you are restating a problem you’ve already introduced, you should avoid phrasing it identically to how it appeared in the introduction . Ideally, you’ll find a novel way to circle back to the problem from the more detailed ideas discussed in the body.

For example, an argumentative paper advocating new measures to reduce the environmental impact of agriculture might restate its problem as follows:

Meanwhile, an empirical paper studying the relationship of Instagram use with body image issues might present its problem like this:

“In conclusion …”

Avoid starting your conclusion with phrases like “In conclusion” or “To conclude,” as this can come across as too obvious and make your writing seem unsophisticated. The content and placement of your conclusion should make its function clear without the need for additional signposting.

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how to write a conclusion for a informative essay

Having zoomed back in on the problem, it’s time to summarize how the body of the paper went about addressing it, and what conclusions this approach led to.

Depending on the nature of your research paper, this might mean restating your thesis and arguments, or summarizing your overall findings.

Argumentative paper: Restate your thesis and arguments

In an argumentative paper, you will have presented a thesis statement in your introduction, expressing the overall claim your paper argues for. In the conclusion, you should restate the thesis and show how it has been developed through the body of the paper.

Briefly summarize the key arguments made in the body, showing how each of them contributes to proving your thesis. You may also mention any counterarguments you addressed, emphasizing why your thesis holds up against them, particularly if your argument is a controversial one.

Don’t go into the details of your evidence or present new ideas; focus on outlining in broad strokes the argument you have made.

Empirical paper: Summarize your findings

In an empirical paper, this is the time to summarize your key findings. Don’t go into great detail here (you will have presented your in-depth results and discussion already), but do clearly express the answers to the research questions you investigated.

Describe your main findings, even if they weren’t necessarily the ones you expected or hoped for, and explain the overall conclusion they led you to.

Having summed up your key arguments or findings, the conclusion ends by considering the broader implications of your research. This means expressing the key takeaways, practical or theoretical, from your paper—often in the form of a call for action or suggestions for future research.

Argumentative paper: Strong closing statement

An argumentative paper generally ends with a strong closing statement. In the case of a practical argument, make a call for action: What actions do you think should be taken by the people or organizations concerned in response to your argument?

If your topic is more theoretical and unsuitable for a call for action, your closing statement should express the significance of your argument—for example, in proposing a new understanding of a topic or laying the groundwork for future research.

Empirical paper: Future research directions

In a more empirical paper, you can close by either making recommendations for practice (for example, in clinical or policy papers), or suggesting directions for future research.

Whatever the scope of your own research, there will always be room for further investigation of related topics, and you’ll often discover new questions and problems during the research process .

Finish your paper on a forward-looking note by suggesting how you or other researchers might build on this topic in the future and address any limitations of the current paper.

Full examples of research paper conclusions are shown in the tabs below: one for an argumentative paper, the other for an empirical paper.

  • Argumentative paper
  • Empirical paper

While the role of cattle in climate change is by now common knowledge, countries like the Netherlands continually fail to confront this issue with the urgency it deserves. The evidence is clear: To create a truly futureproof agricultural sector, Dutch farmers must be incentivized to transition from livestock farming to sustainable vegetable farming. As well as dramatically lowering emissions, plant-based agriculture, if approached in the right way, can produce more food with less land, providing opportunities for nature regeneration areas that will themselves contribute to climate targets. Although this approach would have economic ramifications, from a long-term perspective, it would represent a significant step towards a more sustainable and resilient national economy. Transitioning to sustainable vegetable farming will make the Netherlands greener and healthier, setting an example for other European governments. Farmers, policymakers, and consumers must focus on the future, not just on their own short-term interests, and work to implement this transition now.

As social media becomes increasingly central to young people’s everyday lives, it is important to understand how different platforms affect their developing self-conception. By testing the effect of daily Instagram use among teenage girls, this study established that highly visual social media does indeed have a significant effect on body image concerns, with a strong correlation between the amount of time spent on the platform and participants’ self-reported dissatisfaction with their appearance. However, the strength of this effect was moderated by pre-test self-esteem ratings: Participants with higher self-esteem were less likely to experience an increase in body image concerns after using Instagram. This suggests that, while Instagram does impact body image, it is also important to consider the wider social and psychological context in which this usage occurs: Teenagers who are already predisposed to self-esteem issues may be at greater risk of experiencing negative effects. Future research into Instagram and other highly visual social media should focus on establishing a clearer picture of how self-esteem and related constructs influence young people’s experiences of these platforms. Furthermore, while this experiment measured Instagram usage in terms of time spent on the platform, observational studies are required to gain more insight into different patterns of usage—to investigate, for instance, whether active posting is associated with different effects than passive consumption of social media content.

If you’re unsure about the conclusion, it can be helpful to ask a friend or fellow student to read your conclusion and summarize the main takeaways.

  • Do they understand from your conclusion what your research was about?
  • Are they able to summarize the implications of your findings?
  • Can they answer your research question based on your conclusion?

You can also get an expert to proofread and feedback your paper with a paper editing service .

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how to write a conclusion for a informative essay

The conclusion of a research paper has several key elements you should make sure to include:

  • A restatement of the research problem
  • A summary of your key arguments and/or findings
  • A short discussion of the implications of your research

No, it’s not appropriate to present new arguments or evidence in the conclusion . While you might be tempted to save a striking argument for last, research papers follow a more formal structure than this.

All your findings and arguments should be presented in the body of the text (more specifically in the results and discussion sections if you are following a scientific structure). The conclusion is meant to summarize and reflect on the evidence and arguments you have already presented, not introduce new ones.

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Steps to writing an essay: the complete guide, sponsored post.

  • February 22, 2024

Starting an essay writing journey may look scary at first, but don’t worry! When approached correctly and following a clear map, anyone can come up with a strong essay. This guide will help you to understand how to write an essay by breaking down the steps for writing an essay, and thus you will have a complete comprehension of the whole process. No matter if you are working on argumentative, persuasive, informative, or narrative essays, these steps on writing an essay will act as a good set of instructions to show you the way through the world of essay writing.

First 5 steps of writing an essay

1. Understanding the essay type: To begin the writing process, first, you will have to identify the type of an essay you are working on. What is its type? There are specific features and demands for each type. For instance, an argumentative essay needs a clear standpoint on a particular issue, while narrative essay comprises story telling. Spend some time musing over the core of your essay so that you will have an easier time writing.

2. Brainstorming and research: Once you have determined the essay type you are expected to write, make sure you do proper brainstorming and get all the necessary data. Put down the main arguments and explanations you wish to include in your essay. Do thorough research to guarantee the information is based on reliable sources. If you struggle to research information, ask for help at EssayHave. It’s an essay writing service which can help you with research.

3. Creating an outline: A good essay should be supported by a proper outline. Break down your essay into three main parts: The introduction, body, and conclusion. The introduction lists the main points, the body paragraphs are subtitled with the main arguments and the conclusion summarizes the main arguments and leaves a lasting impression. An outline makes your essay coherent and arranged in a certain chain of sequence.

4. Crafting a strong introduction: The introductory paragraph of your essay is its voice and it is what attracts the reader. First of all include a hook – interesting fact, challenging question, or good quote. Ensure that your thesis is clearly defined in your essay; it should lay down the central idea. Briefly introduce what readers will get and see to it that your intro is not long but still creative.

5. Developing the body: The body of your essay is the major component where you put forth and support your key issues in English studies. Every paragraph must have a main idea and certain. Lay out your arguments in simple and plain language, the connecting between paragraphs is also needed to be smooth. If you are writing an argumentative essay, one thing to think about is the counterarguments to build your position.

Tips on how to make an outstanding essay

Now that we’ve covered the initial steps to writing an essay, let’s explore some tips to elevate your essay writing skills:

  • Be clear and concise: Eliminate extraneous complexity from your writing. Your ideas, thus, argue eloquently. Make every word matter, and cut out any extraneous details that don’t support your essay’s main point.
  • Tailor your writing style to the essay type: Different kinds of essays demand different writing approaches. The tone of an argumentative essay must be strong and assertive whereas a narrative essay is more open and personal. Your writing style should conform to the objective of your essay.
  • Create a captivating thesis statement: Your thesis should capture your essay’s main idea in no more than one sentence. This is your reader’s compass as it points them to the central argument of your paper. Formalize a thesis statement which is precise, not too long, and impressive.
  • Revise and edit: Revise and edit your essay when you are done with the first draft. Check for grammatical errors, clarity of expression, and overall coherence. Think of asking fellow students or professors for their useful suggestions in the refinement process.

Refining your writing with style and clarity

An ideal essay is not just a matter of following the steps asked but is about having your own voice in the piece of writing and making it appeal to your reader with ease. Here’s how you can refine your essay to make it truly stand out:It is predicted.

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Final essay writing steps

6. Writing an engaging conclusion: Here the conclusion is the final chance to make a deep impact in the minds of the readers. In conclusion, and synthesis of the central idea of discussion, the thesis should be restated in a new light. Do not introduce some new information in the conclusion and let your readers think about it.

7. Proofreading: Before you hand in your essay, make a complete proofreading. Check for spelling and grammar mistakes, make your writing style consistent, and make sure that you have followed your teacher’s instructions. A well-reflected essay is a sign of your commitment to quality research.

8. Seeking feedback: In the essay writing steps, try to ask for feedback in the form of your peers, friends, and teachers. New angles can provide a different viewpoint and identify areas of deficiency. Criticism is supposed to help a writer grow and develop, and that is an integral aspect of the writing process.

Summing up!

Having mastered the segments of writing a great essay is an invaluable ability that sets the course open for competent communication and self-expression. No matter what type of essay you have to write, whether argumentative, persuasive, informative, or narrative, if you follow these steps of writing an essay and apply the tips provided, you will get a good essay. Practice makes perfect, so you should not be afraid of trying different types of essays and developing your techniques with time. Happy writing!

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  1. Best Tips and Help on How to Write a Conclusion for Your Essay

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  1. How to Write an Informative Paragraph PPT with Audio Narration Grades 3

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COMMENTS

  1. How to Conclude an Essay

    Step 1: Return to your thesis To begin your conclusion, signal that the essay is coming to an end by returning to your overall argument. Don't just repeat your thesis statement —instead, try to rephrase your argument in a way that shows how it has been developed since the introduction. Example: Returning to the thesis

  2. How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay

    1 Restate your thesis As you set out to write your conclusion and end your essay on an insightful note, you'll want to start by restating your thesis. Since the thesis is the central idea of your entire essay, it's wise to remind the reader of the purpose of your paper.

  3. How to End an Essay: Writing a Strong Conclusion

    Method 1 Writing a Strong Conclusion Download Article 1 Start with a small transition. This isn't necessary, but it can help your essay flow seamlessly and cue the ending of your argument. Read the last sentence of the previous paragraph. What naturally comes to mind as a following sentence? Try using one of these transitional phrases: [1]

  4. How to Write an Informative Essay in 7 Steps

    In the conclusion section, summarize your essay in a few sentences. Think of this as a recap of the points you made in your body paragraphs. Somewhere within this recap, reiterate your thesis statement. You don't need to restate it in the exact same words you used in your introduction, but you should remind the reader of your essay's primary focus.

  5. Ending the Essay: Conclusions

    The conclusion might make the new but related point that the novel on the whole suggests that such an integration is (or isn't) possible. Finally, some advice on how not to end an essay: Don't simply summarize your essay. A brief summary of your argument may be useful, especially if your essay is long--more than ten pages or so.

  6. Conclusions

    Highlight the "so what" At the beginning of your paper, you explain to your readers what's at stake—why they should care about the argument you're making. In your conclusion, you can bring readers back to those stakes by reminding them why your argument is important in the first place.

  7. Conclusions

    The conclusion allows you to have the final say on the issues you have raised in your paper, to synthesize your thoughts, to demonstrate the importance of your ideas, and to propel your reader to a new view of the subject. It is also your opportunity to make a good final impression and to end on a positive note.

  8. Conclusions

    Conclusions wrap up what you have been discussing in your paper. After moving from general to specific information in the introduction and body paragraphs, your conclusion should begin pulling back into more general information that restates the main points of your argument. Conclusions may also call for action or overview future possible research.

  9. How to write a conclusion to an essay

    A conclusion is the final idea left with the reader at the end of an essay. A conclusion should link back to the essay question and briefly restate your main points. It could also include a final ...

  10. How to Write a Conclusion for Your Next Writing Project

    How to Write a Conclusion for Your Next Writing Project. Conclusions are at the end of nearly every form of writing. A good conclusion paragraph can change a reader's mind when they reach the end of your work, and knowing how to write a thorough, engaging conclusion can make your writing more impactful.

  11. How to Write a Conclusion of an Informative Essay

    Informative essay conclusions need to relate to the information in your previous paragraphs. As a writer, you have three steps to do that: Restate thesis statement Restate main ideas Finish with a call to action Let's reveal more details on each one! P.S. For better clarity, we'll use a well-known example with pandas.

  12. How to Write a Conclusion: Full Writing Guide with Examples

    General Guides How to Write a Conclusion for an Essay Written by Adam J. July 6, 2022 21 min read Share the article By the time you get to the final paragraph of your paper, you have already done so much work on your essay, so all you want to do is to wrap it up as quickly as possible.

  13. How to Write a Strong Essay Conclusion

    In this video, you'll learn how to write a strong essay conclusion paragraph that ties together the essay's main points, shows why your argument matters, and...

  14. How to Write a Conclusion (With Tips and Examples)

    An effective conclusion is created by following these steps: 1. Restate the thesis An effective conclusion brings the reader back to the main point, reminding the reader of the purpose of the essay. However, avoid repeating the thesis verbatim. Paraphrase your argument slightly while still preserving the primary point. 2.

  15. 5 Examples of Concluding Words for Essays

    mark the conclusion - which we'll focus on in this guide. When you reach the end of an essay, you should start the concluding paragraph with a transition signal that acts as a bridge to the summary of your key points. Check out some concluding transition signals below and learn how you can use them in your writing. To Conclude…

  16. Writing an Informative Essay

    Writing an Informative Essay Informative essays engage readers with new, interesting, and often surprising facts and details about a subject. Informative essays are educational; readers expect to learn something new from them. In fact, much of the reading and writing done in college and the workplace is informative. From textbooks to reports to tutorials like…

  17. How to Write a Conclusion: 9 Steps (with Pictures)

    For example, you may have opened your introduction with an anecdote, quote, or image. Bring it back up in your conclusion. Similarly, if you opened with a rhetorical question, you might offer a potential answer in your conclusion. 3. Include all of your points in your summary, rather than focusing on one.

  18. How to Write an Informative Essay Guide

    How to Write an Informative Essay? The bad news is that if you're anything like the majority of students, you're overwhelmed with all kinds of essays your teachers ask you to create. It feels as if they multiply day on day.

  19. 17 Essay Conclusion Examples (Copy and Paste)

    Version 1 Filled-In The arguments presented in this essay demonstrate the significant importance of fighting climate change. While there are some strong counterarguments, such as the claim that it is too late to stop catastrophic change, it remains clear that the merits of taking drastic action far outweigh the potential downsides.

  20. Conclusion Examples: Strong Endings for Any Paper

    Your conclusion should also refer back to your introduction, summarize three main points of your essay and wrap it all up with a final observation. If you conclude with an interesting insight, readers will be happy to have spent time on your writing. See how a professional writer creates a thought-provoking conclusion.

  21. How to Write an Informative Essay: Expert Tips and Techniques

    Reasons to Write an Informative Essay. Writing an informative essay, whether in an IEEE format or any other style, offers an opportunity to share expertise, educate others, and shed light on lesser-known topics. Whether driven by passion, a desire to showcase expertise or a quest for spreading awareness, there are compelling reasons to embark on this writing journey:

  22. Informative Essay

    How to write Example What is informative writing? Informative writing educates the reader about a certain topic. An informative essay may explain new information, describe a process, or clarify a concept. The provided information is objective, meaning the writing focuses on presentation of fact and should not contain personal opinion or bias.

  23. How to Close an Informative Essay

    Writing the conclusion for your informative essay is just as important as the introduction. The conclusion is the last thing your reader will read about your topic, which is why it needs to pack a powerful punch to make it relevant and memorable.

  24. How to Write an Informative Essay

    There are six steps or stages to writing an informative essay. They are: choosing a topic, researching for an informative essay, constructing an outline of your informative essay, writing and concluding, finalizing, and revising the project. Following these steps will help students write an informative essay correctly.

  25. Writing a Research Paper Conclusion

    Table of contents. Step 1: Restate the problem. Step 2: Sum up the paper. Step 3: Discuss the implications. Research paper conclusion examples. Frequently asked questions about research paper conclusions.

  26. Steps to Writing an Essay: The Complete Guide

    3. Creating an outline: A good essay should be supported by a proper outline.Break down your essay into three main parts: The introduction, body, and conclusion. The introduction lists the main ...

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