Argumentative Essay Guide

Argumentative Essay Outline

Nova A.

Argumentative Essay Outline: How to Structure Your Argumentative Essay

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Published on: Feb 11, 2018

Last updated on: Nov 22, 2023

argumentative essay outline

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Preparing to write an argumentative essay but don’t know where to start?

Making an outline is an important step in prewriting. Having a defined outline makes the essay writing process much simpler. It helps you logically present your ideas and saves you from getting stuck with writer’s block. 

In this blog, we are going to teach you about how to write an outline for your essay. You’ll also get examples and templates to help you out.

So continue reading!

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How To Write An Argumentative Essay Outline?

A simple argumentative essay outline follows the same structure as any other type of essay. The difference lies in the content of the body paragraphs. Unlike a persuasive essay, where the focus is on convincing the reader through emotional appeals, the argumentative essay presents the argument.

Some paragraphs introduce your own argument, while others state the opposing arguments and their refutations. 

Here is an argumentative essay outline template you could follow for writing your essay:

The most common structure to craft an argumentative essay is as follows:

1. Argumentative Essay Introduction 

The introductory paragraph introduces the main argument and provides a brief background of the argumentative essay topic you chose. Essay introductions act as a roadmap for the entire essay. For an argumentative essay, this is where you lay the foundation for your argument.  An introduction comprises the following essential components: 

  • Hook Statement

A hook statement is written to grab the attention of your reader immediately. It should intrigue the reader and make them read the complete essay. For example, if you are writing an argumentative essay on animal testing, your hook statement could be: 

  • Background Information 

Provide brief background information about your argument and the main claim of your essay. It will make it easier for the reader to understand the argument you will make in your essay.  For example:

  • Thesis Statement

An argumentative essay thesis statement should highlight your perspective, stance, and reason for your position. A thesis statement must be clearly defined, arguable, and defendable. It should express the importance of your argument and a reason why the reader should read your essay. For Example:

In case you're looking for some inspiration for your topic, check out our argumentative essay topics blog!

2. Argumentative Essay Supporting Paragraphs 

In the body paragraph, you present your point of view and provide evidence that supports your argument. The goal here is to explain how valid your claim is by providing evidence that strengthens your argument. 

For Example:

Here are four basic things that a body paragraph should state.

a. The purpose: Why are you making an argument about a particular issue? 

b. Topic sentence: This is a fact or an example that helps the reader better understand your argument. The topic sentence of a paragraph should focus on just one point.

c. Provide evidence: State facts with examples and statistics that support your thesis statement and the topic sentence. Make sure that you have collected authentic evidence from credible sources. 

d. Concluding sentence: The concluding sentence should reassert how the topic sentence helps the reader better understand the claim. 

3. Argumentative Essay Counter Arguments Paragraph 

The counter-argument is the other side of the issue that you will prove wrong by stating the specific reasons. In this paragraph, you mention the opposing views that the reader might pose against your argument and refute them.  Conclude this paragraph by reasserting the thought provoking central idea of your essay.

4. Argumentative Essay Conclusion

A good argumentative essay conclusion summarizes the entire discussion of the essay and provides a call to action. It holds the same significance as the introduction paragraph. Here, you restate your thesis statement to remind the reader of your essay’s overall argument. Tell the reader that you have critically analyzed both sides of the argument. And based on the evidence, you have proved your side of the argument right. Explain the importance of your argument and bring your discussion to a logical end. You can propose a solution if your claim has specified a problem or make future predictions about the claim. Tell your reader the consequences if your argument is not believed and what good will happen if it's believed.

Here is an example:

Use the following argumentative essay outline graphic organizer to structure your essay efficiently.

Argumentative Essay Outline Graphic Organizer

Here’s a video demonstrating how you can prepare an argumentative essay outline:

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Types of Arguments and Argumentative Essay Outlines

Your argumentative essay structure is affected by the type of argument you are using. There are three argumentative writing models: Classical, Rogerian, and Toulmin. 

Let's take a look at each one:

Classical Argument

The classical argument is the oldest and most used argument model. It is based on the principles of rhetoric, which is the art of persuasion. This type of argument has a clear structure with distinct steps, making it an ideal choice for an essay or paper.

Here is the classical argumentative writing structure.

Classical Argumentative Essay Outline Template

Rogerian argument.

The Rogerian model allows both sides of an issue to be discussed to reach a common ground.

Unlike the classical approach, the Rogerian argument seeks to understand both sides of an issue before moving forward. This style of argumentation does not look for a single ‘right’ answer but seeks to create a dialogue between all parties.

Rhetorical Rogerian Argumentative Essay Outline Template

Toulmin argument.

The Toulmin argument is a model that breaks down an issue into its component parts to analyze it more thoroughly. The Toulmin argument is composed of six parts: a claim, grounds, warrant, backing, qualifier, and rebuttal.

The first part lays out the main point being argued (the “claim”) . This is followed by the evidence that supports it (the “grounds”) . It is then connected to an underlying assumption or principle (the “warrant”) . 

The warrant is then supported by additional evidence (the “backing”) , which may be followed by qualifications (the “qualifier”) . Finally, the argument may anticipate and address possible counterarguments (the “rebuttal”) .

Toulmin Argumentative Essay Outline Template

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Need more sample essays to get a better idea? Give our argumentative essay examples a read!

The Bottom Line! We've covered all the essential elements of structuring your argumentative essay. With this guide, you're now well-prepared to craft a compelling essay that effectively presents your viewpoint and supports your argument with evidence. 

Remember the key components: the introduction that hooks your reader, a clear thesis statement, well-organized body paragraphs, counterarguments, and a strong conclusion. Don't forget to cite your sources properly to give credibility to your work. 

If you are unable to craft a perfect outline, you can always seek the help of an expert and professional essay writer at MyPerfectWords.com.

Our affordable argumentative essay writing service can help you write a top-notch argumentative paper. Our expert writers conduct research to find facts and evidence to support your claim and write an original essay according to your needs.

So reach out to our custom essay writing service today! 

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Nova Allison is a Digital Content Strategist with over eight years of experience. Nova has also worked as a technical and scientific writer. She is majorly involved in developing and reviewing online content plans that engage and resonate with audiences. Nova has a passion for writing that engages and informs her readers.

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  • How to write an essay outline | Guidelines & examples

How to Write an Essay Outline | Guidelines & Examples

Published on August 14, 2020 by Jack Caulfield . Revised on July 23, 2023.

An essay outline is a way of planning the structure of your essay before you start writing. It involves writing quick summary sentences or phrases for every point you will cover in each paragraph , giving you a picture of how your argument will unfold.

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Table of contents

Organizing your material, presentation of the outline, examples of essay outlines, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about essay outlines.

At the stage where you’re writing an essay outline, your ideas are probably still not fully formed. You should know your topic  and have already done some preliminary research to find relevant sources , but now you need to shape your ideas into a structured argument.

Creating categories

Look over any information, quotes and ideas you’ve noted down from your research and consider the central point you want to make in the essay—this will be the basis of your thesis statement . Once you have an idea of your overall argument, you can begin to organize your material in a way that serves that argument.

Try to arrange your material into categories related to different aspects of your argument. If you’re writing about a literary text, you might group your ideas into themes; in a history essay, it might be several key trends or turning points from the period you’re discussing.

Three main themes or subjects is a common structure for essays. Depending on the length of the essay, you could split the themes into three body paragraphs, or three longer sections with several paragraphs covering each theme.

As you create the outline, look critically at your categories and points: Are any of them irrelevant or redundant? Make sure every topic you cover is clearly related to your thesis statement.

Order of information

When you have your material organized into several categories, consider what order they should appear in.

Your essay will always begin and end with an introduction and conclusion , but the organization of the body is up to you.

Consider these questions to order your material:

  • Is there an obvious starting point for your argument?
  • Is there one subject that provides an easy transition into another?
  • Do some points need to be set up by discussing other points first?

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Within each paragraph, you’ll discuss a single idea related to your overall topic or argument, using several points of evidence or analysis to do so.

In your outline, you present these points as a few short numbered sentences or phrases.They can be split into sub-points when more detail is needed.

The template below shows how you might structure an outline for a five-paragraph essay.

  • Thesis statement
  • First piece of evidence
  • Second piece of evidence
  • Summary/synthesis
  • Importance of topic
  • Strong closing statement

You can choose whether to write your outline in full sentences or short phrases. Be consistent in your choice; don’t randomly write some points as full sentences and others as short phrases.

Examples of outlines for different types of essays are presented below: an argumentative, expository, and literary analysis essay.

Argumentative essay outline

This outline is for a short argumentative essay evaluating the internet’s impact on education. It uses short phrases to summarize each point.

Its body is split into three paragraphs, each presenting arguments about a different aspect of the internet’s effects on education.

  • Importance of the internet
  • Concerns about internet use
  • Thesis statement: Internet use a net positive
  • Data exploring this effect
  • Analysis indicating it is overstated
  • Students’ reading levels over time
  • Why this data is questionable
  • Video media
  • Interactive media
  • Speed and simplicity of online research
  • Questions about reliability (transitioning into next topic)
  • Evidence indicating its ubiquity
  • Claims that it discourages engagement with academic writing
  • Evidence that Wikipedia warns students not to cite it
  • Argument that it introduces students to citation
  • Summary of key points
  • Value of digital education for students
  • Need for optimism to embrace advantages of the internet

Expository essay outline

This is the outline for an expository essay describing how the invention of the printing press affected life and politics in Europe.

The paragraphs are still summarized in short phrases here, but individual points are described with full sentences.

  • Claim that the printing press marks the end of the Middle Ages.
  • Provide background on the low levels of literacy before the printing press.
  • Present the thesis statement: The invention of the printing press increased circulation of information in Europe, paving the way for the Reformation.
  • Discuss the very high levels of illiteracy in medieval Europe.
  • Describe how literacy and thus knowledge and education were mainly the domain of religious and political elites.
  • Indicate how this discouraged political and religious change.
  • Describe the invention of the printing press in 1440 by Johannes Gutenberg.
  • Show the implications of the new technology for book production.
  • Describe the rapid spread of the technology and the printing of the Gutenberg Bible.
  • Link to the Reformation.
  • Discuss the trend for translating the Bible into vernacular languages during the years following the printing press’s invention.
  • Describe Luther’s own translation of the Bible during the Reformation.
  • Sketch out the large-scale effects the Reformation would have on religion and politics.
  • Summarize the history described.
  • Stress the significance of the printing press to the events of this period.

Literary analysis essay outline

The literary analysis essay outlined below discusses the role of theater in Jane Austen’s novel Mansfield Park .

The body of the essay is divided into three different themes, each of which is explored through examples from the book.

  • Describe the theatricality of Austen’s works
  • Outline the role theater plays in Mansfield Park
  • Introduce the research question : How does Austen use theater to express the characters’ morality in Mansfield Park ?
  • Discuss Austen’s depiction of the performance at the end of the first volume
  • Discuss how Sir Bertram reacts to the acting scheme
  • Introduce Austen’s use of stage direction–like details during dialogue
  • Explore how these are deployed to show the characters’ self-absorption
  • Discuss Austen’s description of Maria and Julia’s relationship as polite but affectionless
  • Compare Mrs. Norris’s self-conceit as charitable despite her idleness
  • Summarize the three themes: The acting scheme, stage directions, and the performance of morals
  • Answer the research question
  • Indicate areas for further study

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make an outline of an argumentative essay

You will sometimes be asked to hand in an essay outline before you start writing your essay . Your supervisor wants to see that you have a clear idea of your structure so that writing will go smoothly.

Even when you do not have to hand it in, writing an essay outline is an important part of the writing process . It’s a good idea to write one (as informally as you like) to clarify your structure for yourself whenever you are working on an essay.

If you have to hand in your essay outline , you may be given specific guidelines stating whether you have to use full sentences. If you’re not sure, ask your supervisor.

When writing an essay outline for yourself, the choice is yours. Some students find it helpful to write out their ideas in full sentences, while others prefer to summarize them in short phrases.

You should try to follow your outline as you write your essay . However, if your ideas change or it becomes clear that your structure could be better, it’s okay to depart from your essay outline . Just make sure you know why you’re doing so.

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Argumentative Essay – Outline, Form, and Examples

Daniel Bal

What is an argumentative essay?

An argumentative essay requires the writer to investigate a specific topic by collecting and evaluating evidence to establish a position on the subject matter.

make an outline of an argumentative essay

When preparing to compose a good argumentative essay, utilize the following steps:

Step 1: Select a topic.

Step 2: Identify a position.

Step 3: Locate appropriate resources.

Step 4: Identify evidence supporting the position. ( NOTE: If there is little evidence in support of the claim, consider re-examining the main argument.)

Steps to write an argumentative essay

When gathering evidence, use credible sources . To determine the credibility of the source, consider authority, currency, accuracy, and objectivity:

Who is the author ? Are they an expert in the field? Has a reputable publisher published the work?

How current is the information in the source? Does the currency of the source matter? Does the age of the source impact the content? Is there newer information that disproves the source’s information?

Can other sources verify the accuracy of the information? Does the information contradict that found in other commonly accepted sources?

Is there any evidence of bias, or is the source objective ? Is the research sponsored by an organization that may skew the information?

The following are typically recognized as providing appropriate, credible research material:

Peer-reviewed journals/research papers

Government agencies

Professional organizations

Library databases

Reference books

Credible sources

Writers should avoid using the following sources:

Social media posts

Out-of-date materials

Step 5: Utilize the research to determine a thesis statement that identifies the topic, position, and support(s).

Step 6: Use the evidence to construct an outline, detailing the main supports and relevant evidence.

Steps to write an argumentative essay

Argumentative essay outline

After gathering all of the necessary research, the next step in composing an argumentative essay focuses on organizing the information through the use of an outline:

Introduction

Attention Grabber/Hook

Background Information: Include any background information pertinent to the topic that the reader needs to know to understand the argument.

Thesis: State the position in connection to the main topic and identify the supports that will help prove the argument.

Topic sentence

Identify evidence in support of the claim in the topic sentence

Explain how the evidence supports the argument

Evidence 3 (Continue as needed)

Support 2 (Continue as needed)

Restate thesis

Review main supports

Concluding statement

Invite the audience to take a specific action.

Identify the overall importance of the topic and position.

Argumentative essay outline

How to write an argumentative essay

Regardless of the writer’s topic or point of view, an argumentative essay should include an introductory paragraph, body paragraphs, a conclusion, and works cited.

Background information

Body Paragraphs

Analysis of evidence

Rephrased thesis

Review of main ideas

Call to action

Works Cited

Components of an argumentative essay

Argumentative essay introduction

The introduction sets the tone for the entire paper and introduces the argument. In general, the first paragraph(s) should attract the reader’s attention, provide relevant context, and conclude with a thesis statement.

To attract the reader's attention , start with an introductory device. There are several attention-grabbing techniques, the most common of which consist of the following:

The writer can emphasize the topic’s importance by explaining the current interest in the topic or indicating that the subject is influential.

Pertinent statistics give the paper an air of authority.

There are many reasons for a stimulating statement to surprise a reader. Sometimes it is joyful; sometimes it is shocking; sometimes it is surprising because of who said it.

An interesting incident or anecdote can act as a teaser to lure the reader into the remainder of the essay. Be sure that the device is appropriate for the subject and focus of what follows.

Provide the reader with relevant context and background information necessary to understand the topic.

Conclude with a thesis statement that identifies the overall purpose of the essay (topic and position). Writers can also include their support directly in the thesis, which outlines the structure of the essay for the reader.

Avoid the following when writing the introduction to argumentative writing:

Starting with dictionary definitions is too overdone and unappealing.

Do not make an announcement of the topic like “In this paper I will…” or “The purpose of this essay is to….”

Evidence supporting or developing the thesis should be in the body paragraphs, not the introduction.

Beginning the essay with general or absolute statements such as “throughout history...” or “as human beings we always...” or similar statements suggest the writer knows all of history or that all people behave or think in the same way.

Argumentative essay thesis

The thesis statement is the single, specific claim the writer sets out to prove and is typically positioned as the last sentence of the introduction . It is the controlling idea of the entire argument that identifies the topic, position, and reasoning.

When constructing a thesis for an argumentative paper, make sure it contains a side of the argument, not simply a topic. An argumentative thesis identifies the writer’s position on a given topic. If a position cannot be taken, then it is not argumentative thesis:

Topic: Capital punishment is practiced in many states.

Thesis: Capital punishment should be illegal.

While not always required, the thesis statement can include the supports the writer will use to prove the main claim. Therefore, a thesis statement can be structured as follows:

TOPIC + POSITION (+ SUPPORTS)

No Supports: College athletes (TOPIC) should be financially compensated (POSITION).

Supports: College athletes (TOPIC) should be financially compensated (POSITION) because they sacrifice their minds and bodies (SUPPORT 1), cannot hold

Argumentative essay body paragraphs

Body paragraphs can be of varying lengths, but they must present a coherent argument unified under a single topic. They are rarely ever longer than one page, double-spaced; usually they are much shorter.

Lengthy paragraphs indicate a lack of structure. Identify the main ideas of a lengthy paragraph to determine if they make more sense as separate topics in separate paragraphs.

Shorter paragraphs usually indicate a lack of substance; there is not enough evidence or analysis to prove the argument. Develop the ideas more or integrate the information into another paragraph.

The structure of an argumentative paragraph should include a topic sentence, evidence, and a transition.

The topic sentence is the thesis of the paragraph that identifies the arguable point in support of the main argument. The reader should know exactly what the writer is trying to prove within the paragraph by reading the first sentence.

The supporting evidence and analysis provide information to support the claim. There should be a balance between the evidence (facts, quotations, summary of events/plot, etc.) and analysis (interpretation of evidence). If the paragraph is evidence-heavy, there is not much of an argument; if it is analysis-heavy, there is not enough evidence in support of the claim.

The transition can be at the beginning or the end of a paragraph. However, it is much easier to combine the transition with the concluding observation to help the paragraphs flow into one another. Transitions in academic writing should tell the reader where you were, where you are going, and relate to the thesis.

Some essays may benefit from the inclusion of rebuttals to potential counterarguments of the writer’s position.

Argumentative essay conclusion

The conclusion should make readers glad they read the paper. It can suggest broader implications that will not only interest readers but also enrich their understanding in some way. There are three aspects to follow when constructing the conclusion: rephrase the thesis, synthesize information, and call the reader to action.

Rephrased the thesis in the first sentence of the conclusion. It must be in different words; do not simply write it verbatim.

Synthesize the argument by showing how the paper's main points support the argument.

Propose a course of action or a solution to an issue. This can redirect the reader's thought process to apply the ideas to their life or to see the broader implications of the topic.

Avoid the following when constructing the conclusion:

Beginning with an unnecessary, overused phrase such as "in conclusion," "in summary," or "in closing;" although these phrases can work in speeches, they come across as trite in writing

Introducing a new idea or subtopic in the conclusion

Making sentimental, emotional appeals that are out of character with the rest of the paper

Including evidence (quotations, statistics, etc.) that should be in the body of the paper

Argumentative essay examples

Examples of argumentative essays vary depending upon the type:

Academic essays differ based upon the topic and position. These essays follow a more traditional structure and are typically assigned in high school or college. Examples of academic argumentative essay topics include the following:

Advantages or disadvantages of social media

Animal testing

Art education

Benefit or detriment of homework

Capital punishment

Class warfare

Immigration

School uniforms

Universal healthcare

Violence in video games

Argumentative literary essays are typically more informal and do not follow the same structure as an academic essay. The following are popular examples of argumentative literary essays:

“Letter from Birmingham Jail” by Martin Luther King, Jr.

“Death of the Moth” by Virginia Woolf

“Shooting an Elephant” by George Orwell

“Thoughts for the Times on War and Death” by Sigmund Freud

“Does the Truth Matter? Science, Pseudoscience, and Civilization” by Carl Sagan

“Self-Reliance” by Ralph Waldo Emerson

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What is an argumentative essay?

The argumentative essay is a genre of writing that requires the student to investigate a topic; collect, generate, and evaluate evidence; and establish a position on the topic in a concise manner.

Please note : Some confusion may occur between the argumentative essay and the expository essay. These two genres are similar, but the argumentative essay differs from the expository essay in the amount of pre-writing (invention) and research involved. The argumentative essay is commonly assigned as a capstone or final project in first year writing or advanced composition courses and involves lengthy, detailed research. Expository essays involve less research and are shorter in length. Expository essays are often used for in-class writing exercises or tests, such as the GED or GRE.

Argumentative essay assignments generally call for extensive research of literature or previously published material. Argumentative assignments may also require empirical research where the student collects data through interviews, surveys, observations, or experiments. Detailed research allows the student to learn about the topic and to understand different points of view regarding the topic so that she/he may choose a position and support it with the evidence collected during research. Regardless of the amount or type of research involved, argumentative essays must establish a clear thesis and follow sound reasoning.

The structure of the argumentative essay is held together by the following.

  • A clear, concise, and defined thesis statement that occurs in the first paragraph of the essay.

In the first paragraph of an argument essay, students should set the context by reviewing the topic in a general way. Next the author should explain why the topic is important ( exigence ) or why readers should care about the issue. Lastly, students should present the thesis statement. It is essential that this thesis statement be appropriately narrowed to follow the guidelines set forth in the assignment. If the student does not master this portion of the essay, it will be quite difficult to compose an effective or persuasive essay.

  • Clear and logical transitions between the introduction, body, and conclusion.

Transitions are the mortar that holds the foundation of the essay together. Without logical progression of thought, the reader is unable to follow the essay’s argument, and the structure will collapse. Transitions should wrap up the idea from the previous section and introduce the idea that is to follow in the next section.

  • Body paragraphs that include evidential support.

Each paragraph should be limited to the discussion of one general idea. This will allow for clarity and direction throughout the essay. In addition, such conciseness creates an ease of readability for one’s audience. It is important to note that each paragraph in the body of the essay must have some logical connection to the thesis statement in the opening paragraph. Some paragraphs will directly support the thesis statement with evidence collected during research. It is also important to explain how and why the evidence supports the thesis ( warrant ).

However, argumentative essays should also consider and explain differing points of view regarding the topic. Depending on the length of the assignment, students should dedicate one or two paragraphs of an argumentative essay to discussing conflicting opinions on the topic. Rather than explaining how these differing opinions are wrong outright, students should note how opinions that do not align with their thesis might not be well informed or how they might be out of date.

  • Evidential support (whether factual, logical, statistical, or anecdotal).

The argumentative essay requires well-researched, accurate, detailed, and current information to support the thesis statement and consider other points of view. Some factual, logical, statistical, or anecdotal evidence should support the thesis. However, students must consider multiple points of view when collecting evidence. As noted in the paragraph above, a successful and well-rounded argumentative essay will also discuss opinions not aligning with the thesis. It is unethical to exclude evidence that may not support the thesis. It is not the student’s job to point out how other positions are wrong outright, but rather to explain how other positions may not be well informed or up to date on the topic.

  • A conclusion that does not simply restate the thesis, but readdresses it in light of the evidence provided.

It is at this point of the essay that students may begin to struggle. This is the portion of the essay that will leave the most immediate impression on the mind of the reader. Therefore, it must be effective and logical. Do not introduce any new information into the conclusion; rather, synthesize the information presented in the body of the essay. Restate why the topic is important, review the main points, and review your thesis. You may also want to include a short discussion of more research that should be completed in light of your work.

A complete argument

Perhaps it is helpful to think of an essay in terms of a conversation or debate with a classmate. If I were to discuss the cause of World War II and its current effect on those who lived through the tumultuous time, there would be a beginning, middle, and end to the conversation. In fact, if I were to end the argument in the middle of my second point, questions would arise concerning the current effects on those who lived through the conflict. Therefore, the argumentative essay must be complete, and logically so, leaving no doubt as to its intent or argument.

The five-paragraph essay

A common method for writing an argumentative essay is the five-paragraph approach. This is, however, by no means the only formula for writing such essays. If it sounds straightforward, that is because it is; in fact, the method consists of (a) an introductory paragraph (b) three evidentiary body paragraphs that may include discussion of opposing views and (c) a conclusion.

Longer argumentative essays

Complex issues and detailed research call for complex and detailed essays. Argumentative essays discussing a number of research sources or empirical research will most certainly be longer than five paragraphs. Authors may have to discuss the context surrounding the topic, sources of information and their credibility, as well as a number of different opinions on the issue before concluding the essay. Many of these factors will be determined by the assignment.

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8 Effective Strategies to Write Argumentative Essays

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In a bustling university town, there lived a student named Alex. Popular for creativity and wit, one challenge seemed insurmountable for Alex– the dreaded argumentative essay!

One gloomy afternoon, as the rain tapped against the window pane, Alex sat at his cluttered desk, staring at a blank document on the computer screen. The assignment loomed large: a 350-600-word argumentative essay on a topic of their choice . With a sigh, he decided to seek help of mentor, Professor Mitchell, who was known for his passion for writing.

Entering Professor Mitchell’s office was like stepping into a treasure of knowledge. Bookshelves lined every wall, faint aroma of old manuscripts in the air and sticky notes over the wall. Alex took a deep breath and knocked on his door.

“Ah, Alex,” Professor Mitchell greeted with a warm smile. “What brings you here today?”

Alex confessed his struggles with the argumentative essay. After hearing his concerns, Professor Mitchell said, “Ah, the argumentative essay! Don’t worry, Let’s take a look at it together.” As he guided Alex to the corner shelf, Alex asked,

Table of Contents

“What is an Argumentative Essay?”

The professor replied, “An argumentative essay is a type of academic writing that presents a clear argument or a firm position on a contentious issue. Unlike other forms of essays, such as descriptive or narrative essays, these essays require you to take a stance, present evidence, and convince your audience of the validity of your viewpoint with supporting evidence. A well-crafted argumentative essay relies on concrete facts and supporting evidence rather than merely expressing the author’s personal opinions . Furthermore, these essays demand comprehensive research on the chosen topic and typically follows a structured format consisting of three primary sections: an introductory paragraph, three body paragraphs, and a concluding paragraph.”

He continued, “Argumentative essays are written in a wide range of subject areas, reflecting their applicability across disciplines. They are written in different subject areas like literature and philosophy, history, science and technology, political science, psychology, economics and so on.

Alex asked,

“When is an Argumentative Essay Written?”

The professor answered, “Argumentative essays are often assigned in academic settings, but they can also be written for various other purposes, such as editorials, opinion pieces, or blog posts. Some situations to write argumentative essays include:

1. Academic assignments

In school or college, teachers may assign argumentative essays as part of coursework. It help students to develop critical thinking and persuasive writing skills .

2. Debates and discussions

Argumentative essays can serve as the basis for debates or discussions in academic or competitive settings. Moreover, they provide a structured way to present and defend your viewpoint.

3. Opinion pieces

Newspapers, magazines, and online publications often feature opinion pieces that present an argument on a current issue or topic to influence public opinion.

4. Policy proposals

In government and policy-related fields, argumentative essays are used to propose and defend specific policy changes or solutions to societal problems.

5. Persuasive speeches

Before delivering a persuasive speech, it’s common to prepare an argumentative essay as a foundation for your presentation.

Regardless of the context, an argumentative essay should present a clear thesis statement , provide evidence and reasoning to support your position, address counterarguments, and conclude with a compelling summary of your main points. The goal is to persuade readers or listeners to accept your viewpoint or at least consider it seriously.”

Handing over a book, the professor continued, “Take a look on the elements or structure of an argumentative essay.”

Elements of an Argumentative Essay

An argumentative essay comprises five essential components:

Claim in argumentative writing is the central argument or viewpoint that the writer aims to establish and defend throughout the essay. A claim must assert your position on an issue and must be arguable. It can guide the entire argument.

2. Evidence

Evidence must consist of factual information, data, examples, or expert opinions that support the claim. Also, it lends credibility by strengthening the writer’s position.

3. Counterarguments

Presenting a counterclaim demonstrates fairness and awareness of alternative perspectives.

4. Rebuttal

After presenting the counterclaim, the writer refutes it by offering counterarguments or providing evidence that weakens the opposing viewpoint. It shows that the writer has considered multiple perspectives and is prepared to defend their position.

The format of an argumentative essay typically follows the structure to ensure clarity and effectiveness in presenting an argument.

How to Write An Argumentative Essay

Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to write an argumentative essay:

1. Introduction

  • Begin with a compelling sentence or question to grab the reader’s attention.
  • Provide context for the issue, including relevant facts, statistics, or historical background.
  • Provide a concise thesis statement to present your position on the topic.

2. Body Paragraphs (usually three or more)

  • Start each paragraph with a clear and focused topic sentence that relates to your thesis statement.
  • Furthermore, provide evidence and explain the facts, statistics, examples, expert opinions, and quotations from credible sources that supports your thesis.
  • Use transition sentences to smoothly move from one point to the next.

3. Counterargument and Rebuttal

  • Acknowledge opposing viewpoints or potential objections to your argument.
  • Also, address these counterarguments with evidence and explain why they do not weaken your position.

4. Conclusion

  • Restate your thesis statement and summarize the key points you’ve made in the body of the essay.
  • Leave the reader with a final thought, call to action, or broader implication related to the topic.

5. Citations and References

  • Properly cite all the sources you use in your essay using a consistent citation style.
  • Also, include a bibliography or works cited at the end of your essay.

6. Formatting and Style

  • Follow any specific formatting guidelines provided by your instructor or institution.
  • Use a professional and academic tone in your writing and edit your essay to avoid content, spelling and grammar mistakes .

Remember that the specific requirements for formatting an argumentative essay may vary depending on your instructor’s guidelines or the citation style you’re using (e.g., APA, MLA, Chicago). Always check the assignment instructions or style guide for any additional requirements or variations in formatting.

Prof. Mitchell continued, “An argumentative essay can adopt various approaches when dealing with opposing perspectives. It may offer a balanced presentation of both sides, providing equal weight to each, or it may advocate more strongly for one side while still acknowledging the existence of opposing views.” As Alex listened carefully to the Professor’s thoughts, his eyes fell on a page with examples of argumentative essay.

Example of an Argumentative Essay

Alex picked the book and read the example. It helped him to understand the concept. Furthermore, he could now connect better to the elements and steps of the essay which Prof. Mitchell had mentioned earlier. Aren’t you keen to know how an argumentative essay should be like? Here is an example of a well-crafted argumentative essay , which was read by Alex. After Alex finished reading the example, the professor turned the page and continued, “Check this page to know the importance of writing an argumentative essay in developing skills of an individual.”

Importance of an Argumentative Essay

Importance_of_an_ArgumentativeEssays

After understanding the benefits, Alex was convinced by the ability of the argumentative essays in advocating one’s beliefs and favor the author’s position. Alex asked,

“How are argumentative essays different from the other types?”

Prof. Mitchell answered, “Argumentative essays differ from other types of essays primarily in their purpose, structure, and approach in presenting information. Unlike expository essays, argumentative essays persuade the reader to adopt a particular point of view or take a specific action on a controversial issue. Furthermore, they differ from descriptive essays by not focusing vividly on describing a topic. Also, they are less engaging through storytelling as compared to the narrative essays.

Alex said, “Given the direct and persuasive nature of argumentative essays, can you suggest some strategies to write an effective argumentative essay?

Turning the pages of the book, Prof. Mitchell replied, “Sure! You can check this infographic to get some tips for writing an argumentative essay.”

Effective Strategies to Write an Argumentative Essay

StrategiesOfWritingArgumentativeEssays

As days turned into weeks, Alex diligently worked on his essay. He researched, gathered evidence, and refined his thesis. It was a long and challenging journey, filled with countless drafts and revisions.

Finally, the day arrived when Alex submitted their essay. As he clicked the “Submit” button, a sense of accomplishment washed over him. He realized that the argumentative essay, while challenging, had improved his critical thinking and transformed him into a more confident writer. Furthermore, Alex received feedback from his professor, a mix of praise and constructive criticism. It was a humbling experience, a reminder that every journey has its obstacles and opportunities for growth.

Frequently Asked Questions

An argumentative essay can be written as follows- 1. Choose a Topic 2. Research and Collect Evidences 3. Develop a Clear Thesis Statement 4. Outline Your Essay- Introduction, Body Paragraphs and Conclusion 5. Revise and Edit 6. Format and Cite Sources 7. Final Review

One must choose a clear, concise and specific statement as a claim. It must be debatable and establish your position. Avoid using ambiguous or unclear while making a claim. To strengthen your claim, address potential counterarguments or opposing viewpoints. Additionally, use persuasive language and rhetoric to make your claim more compelling

Starting an argument essay effectively is crucial to engage your readers and establish the context for your argument. Here’s how you can start an argument essay are: 1. Begin With an Engaging Hook 2. Provide Background Information 3. Present Your Thesis Statement 4. Briefly Outline Your Main 5. Establish Your Credibility

The key features of an argumentative essay are: 1. Clear and Specific Thesis Statement 2. Credible Evidence 3. Counterarguments 4. Structured Body Paragraph 5. Logical Flow 6. Use of Persuasive Techniques 7. Formal Language

An argumentative essay typically consists of the following main parts or sections: 1. Introduction 2. Body Paragraphs 3. Counterargument and Rebuttal 4. Conclusion 5. References (if applicable)

The main purpose of an argumentative essay is to persuade the reader to accept or agree with a particular viewpoint or position on a controversial or debatable topic. In other words, the primary goal of an argumentative essay is to convince the audience that the author's argument or thesis statement is valid, logical, and well-supported by evidence and reasoning.

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How to Create an Outline for an Argumentative Paper

Last Updated: May 11, 2023

This article was co-authored by Jake Adams . Jake Adams is an academic tutor and the owner of Simplifi EDU, a Santa Monica, California based online tutoring business offering learning resources and online tutors for academic subjects K-College, SAT & ACT prep, and college admissions applications. With over 14 years of professional tutoring experience, Jake is dedicated to providing his clients the very best online tutoring experience and access to a network of excellent undergraduate and graduate-level tutors from top colleges all over the nation. Jake holds a BS in International Business and Marketing from Pepperdine University. This article has been viewed 229,081 times.

Having difficulty starting that argumentative paper? Creating an outline can be a useful strategy for organizing your thoughts. An outline will provide you with an overview of the order and logic that an effective argument must follow.

Creating the Outline and Proper Labeling

Step 1 Begin with Roman numeral I.

  • Label subheadings with capitalized letters (A, B, C, etc.). Secondary subheadings begin with lowercase numerals (i., ii., iii., etc.) and tertiary subheadings begin with lowercase letters (a., b., c., etc.).

Step 2 Introductory Paragraph:

  • The very first sentence can be anything from a question or an observation, as long as it gets the reader’s attention. The following sentences must then narrow the topic down to a very specific point: the thesis.
  • As you narrow the topic down, you must of course mention the primary text which your paper is concerned with. If necessary, you may also mention a secondary source that you feel is important to your central argument.

Step 3 Body paragraphs:

  • In a standard 5 paragraph essay, you will have 3 body paragraphs to develop your argument. Each body paragraph must explore a distinct idea that supports your thesis and include evidence from the text and or secondary sources.
  • For a fully developed argumentative essay, you may include counter-arguments to your thesis and subsequent refutations.

Step 4 Conclusion:

  • Do not simply restate the thesis. Your conclusion should return to the thesis with a deeper understanding as a result of the arguments and evidence of the body paragraphs.

Preparation

Step 1 Start with the Thesis.

  • An effective thesis should attempt to elicit a strong response from the reader. A reader should not finish the introductory paragraph and think, “So what?”
  • Be prepared to change your thesis as often as possible. As you generate new ideas and make new logical connections, the scope of your paper will likely change and as a result so should your thesis.

Step 2 Brainstorm.

  • A sound argumentative essay will have a hierarchy of ideas that follows a logical progression. When grouping your ideas, keep in mind how each group relates to the others.

Sample Outlines

make an outline of an argumentative essay

Community Q&A

Community Answer

Video . By using this service, some information may be shared with YouTube.

  • Maintain a sense of continuity in your headings and subheadings. If you begin your first heading with a verb do the same for subsequent ones. Thanks Helpful 3 Not Helpful 0
  • Be very mindful of your sources. Keep track of all the quotations that you will be using with book tabs and highlights. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0
  • Remember that the outline is primarily an organizational tool. When writing your essay you will often develop new ideas that are not in the outline. Allow yourself to explore these new ideas if you feel that it will enhance the strength of your argument. Thanks Helpful 2 Not Helpful 0

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How to Create a Powerful Argumentative Essay Outline: Step-by-Step Guide

How to Create a Powerful Argumentative Essay Outline: Step-by-Step Guide

When it comes to writing an argumentative essay, having a well-structured outline is the key to success. Not only does it help you organize your thoughts and present your arguments effectively, but it also allows you to anticipate counterarguments and develop strong rebuttals. In this step-by-step guide, we will walk you through the process of creating a powerful argumentative essay outline in a simple and straightforward manner.

To begin, it is important to understand what an argumentative essay is and what its main components are. An argumentative essay is a type of paper in which you present a claim or a statement and support it with reasons, evidence, and logical proofs. The goal is to convince the reader that your viewpoint is valid, reasonable, and backed up by solid facts.

First, you need to choose a topic for your argumentative essay. It is important to select a topic that is interesting and relevant to your audience. Once you have chosen a topic, you can start developing your argumentative essay outline.

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Step 1: understand the basics of an argumentative essay.

The first step in developing an argumentative essay is to choose a topic. You need to find a topic that is not only interesting to you but also has enough information and arguments available to support your point of view. Once you have chosen a topic, you can move on to creating an outline.

1.2 Supporting Arguments

The body of your essay is where you present your supporting arguments. Each supporting argument should be presented in a separate paragraph. You should start each paragraph with a topic sentence that clearly states the main point you will be discussing.

To support your arguments, you need to provide evidential proofs and examples. These proofs can include facts, statistics, expert opinions, or real-life examples. Make sure to use clear and concise language to keep your reader engaged.

1.3 Counterarguments and Rebuttal

In an argumentative essay, it’s important to address the opposing viewpoint. This helps to show that you have considered all sides of the argument and strengthens your own position. You can present the opposing viewpoint in a separate paragraph and then provide a rebuttal, explaining why the opposing viewpoint is not valid.

Creating an outline for your argumentative essay can make the writing process much easier. It helps you organize your thoughts and ensures that you have all the necessary information to effectively present your arguments. You can download a template or find similar outlines online to help you get started.

Remember, a strong argumentative essay clearly supports the thesis and addresses the opposing viewpoint. Use clear and concise language, provide evidential proofs, and always consider the counterarguments. With a well-developed outline, you’ll be on the right track to creating a powerful and persuasive argumentative essay!

Step 2: Research Your Topic and Gather Evidence

Finding the hook.

First and foremost, to grab your readers’ attention, you need a compelling hook. A hook can be in the form of a thought-provoking question, a controversial statement, or an interesting fact about your topic. The hook should be appropriate and relevant to your essay’s subject matter.

Gathering Evidence

To back up your thesis statement, you need to gather evidence that supports your position. Look for specific examples, statistics, research studies, or expert opinions that align with your viewpoint. Remember to find reliable sources and cite them appropriately to avoid any plagiarism issues.

Types of Evidence to Include

When gathering evidence, it is important to include a mix of different types to make your argument more powerful. Here are some common types of evidence:

  • Factual evidence: These are verifiable facts, such as statistics or historical data, that can support your claims.
  • Anecdotal evidence: These are personal stories or experiences that support your argument and make it relatable.
  • Expert opinion: Including quotes or statements from experts in the field can add credibility to your argument.
  • Logical reasoning: Use logical thinking to explain why your claims make sense. This can be done through the Toulmin model or other forms of logical frameworks.

Battling the Opposition

When researching your topic, it is important to familiarize yourself with the opposing viewpoints. Understanding the arguments of your opponents allows you to anticipate their counterarguments and address them in your essay. This can be done in the rebuttal section, which comes after presenting your arguments.

By acknowledging and refuting the opposing positions, you strengthen your own argument and show that you have considered different perspectives. This also demonstrates your ability to think critically and objectively.

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Common Mistakes to Avoid

When researching and gathering evidence, there are some common mistakes to avoid:

  • Using outdated or irrelevant sources
  • Not fact-checking the information
  • Only looking for evidence that supports your preconceived notions
  • Not acknowledging or addressing counterarguments

By avoiding these mistakes, you will improve the quality of your argument and ensure that it is well-reasoned and well-supported.

Step 3: Choose Your Side and Craft a Strong Thesis Statement

Choosing a side involves deciding whether you are in favor of or against a particular topic. For example, if your essay is about the consumption of pork, you must decide whether you support or oppose its consumption.

Your thesis statement should clearly state your position on the topic and provide a brief overview of the main points you will discuss in your essay. It should be concise, specific, and arguable. A strong thesis statement not only sets the tone for your essay, but it also acts as a guiding line for your arguments.

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When crafting your thesis statement, it is important to take into consideration the opposing viewpoint and address counterarguments. This strengthens your argument and shows that you have thoroughly researched the topic, making your essay more persuasive and credible.

In some cases, your thesis statement may need to be revised or improved throughout the writing process. As you conduct further research and gather more evidence, you may find that your initial thesis statement needs adjustment. This is a normal part of the writing process, so don’t be afraid to make changes to strengthen your argument.

Remember to keep your thesis statement in line with the structure of your essay. Each body paragraph should correspond to a specific claim made in your thesis statement and support it with appropriate evidence. By following this format, your essay will have a clear and logical flow, making it easier for readers to understand and follow your arguments.

Here’s a sample outline of how the thesis statement and claims can be structured:

  • – Background information on the topic
  • – Thesis statement that clearly states your position

Body Paragraphs

  • – Claim 1: Negative health effects of consuming pork (evidential support)
  • – Claim 2: Unsustainability of pork production (evidential support)
  • – Claim 3: Ethical concerns related to pork consumption (evidential support)
  • – Restate thesis statement and main claims
  • – Summarize supporting evidence
  • – Conclude with a strong closing statement

By choosing a side, crafting a strong thesis statement, and organizing your arguments, you can create a powerful argumentative essay outline. Remember to address counterarguments and include conflicting evidence to make your arguments more convincing. With these tips in mind, you’ll be on your way to writing a compelling and well-structured argumentative essay.

Step 4: Create an Argumentative Essay Outline

Why is creating an outline essential.

Creating an outline is essential because it helps you to structure your essay in a logical and organized way. Without an outline, your essay may lack coherence and clarity, making it difficult for your readers to follow your argument. An outline also helps you to break down your essay into manageable sections, making the writing process more straightforward.

How to create an argumentative essay outline

1. Start with a clear thesis statement: Your thesis statement should clearly state your main argument or claim.

2. Break down your argument into key points: Identify the main points or arguments that support your thesis statement. These points will form the backbone of your essay and will serve as the basis for your body paragraphs.

3. Address opposing viewpoints: To strengthen your argument, anticipate and address opposing viewpoints or objections. Consider the strongest objections to your argument and develop rebuttals or counterarguments to refute them.

4. Organize your information: Organize your key points and evidence in a logical order. You can organize them chronologically, by importance, or by any other meaningful way that supports your argument.

5. Paint a clear picture: Use clear and concise language to paint a vivid picture of your argument. Provide evidence, examples, and explanations to support your claims and help your readers understand your point of view.

Remember that in an argumentative essay, evidence is key. Your arguments should be backed up with strong evidence from reliable sources. Use statistics, studies, expert opinions, and logical reasoning to support your claims.

Overall, creating an argumentative essay outline is an important step in developing a strong and persuasive essay. It helps you to organize your thoughts and ensures that your argument is clear, logical, and supported by evidence. By following the step-by-step approach outlined above, you can create an excellent argumentative essay that grabs your reader’s attention and convinces them of your viewpoint.

When structuring your body paragraphs, it is essential to follow a step-by-step approach to ensure clarity and coherence. Here are some tips to help you create excellent body paragraphs:

  • Start each body paragraph with a topic sentence that introduces the main idea you will discuss in that paragraph.
  • Include clear and specific supporting points that back up your main argument.
  • Provide factual and empirical evidence to support your claims, such as statistics, research findings, or expert opinions.
  • Address potential opposition and counterarguments in your essay and include rebuttals to strengthen your argument.
  • Use transitional words and phrases to ensure smooth flow and logical progression between paragraphs.
  • Restate and summarize your main points at the end of each body paragraph to reinforce your argument.

By following these steps, you can create a well-structured body section that effectively supports your main claim and persuades your audience. Remember to choose Aristotelian or Classical format templates and download sample essays for more assistance in creating your own argumentative essay.

Counterargument

Why counterarguments are important.

Counterarguments serve several important purposes in an argumentative essay:

  • Addressing opposing viewpoints: By including counterarguments, the writer shows they have thoroughly considered the topic and have taken into account different perspectives.
  • Strengthening the argument: By refuting counterarguments, the writer further supports their own viewpoint and demonstrates why it is the most valid one.
  • Backed by evidence: Counterarguments should be supported by evidence and reasoning to show their validity. This helps the writer present a well-rounded and convincing argument.

How to Include Counterarguments

Including counterarguments in an essay can be done in a few simple steps:

  • Find opposing viewpoints: Research and identify commonly held and opposing viewpoints on the topic of your essay.
  • Address counterarguments in the outline: When creating your essay outline, include a section for counterarguments. This ensures that you don’t forget to address them in your essay.
  • Refute counterarguments with evidence: In the body paragraphs of your essay, present counterarguments and refute them using logical reasoning and evidence.

Remember to use strong evidential support when refuting counterarguments. This can include examples, facts, statistics, and expert opinions. By doing so, you strengthen your own argument while weakening the opposing viewpoint.

Example of Addressing Counterarguments

Let’s take a look at a sample counterargument and how it can be refuted:

Counterargument: Some people argue that using animal testing for medical research is necessary for scientific advancement.

Refutation: While it is true that animal testing has contributed to medical breakthroughs in the past, advancements in technology and the development of alternative testing methods make it possible to conduct effective research without the ethical concerns and limitations of using animals.

By addressing counterarguments in this way, the writer acknowledges opposing viewpoints while still presenting a strong argument against the use of animal testing.

In the refutation section, your goal is to clearly and effectively refute the counterclaims or objections raised against your argument. This can be done in a variety of ways, depending on the structure of your essay and the particular points you are addressing.

One approach to refutation is using a classical argument format. In this format, you start by clearly stating the opposing claim, and then provide evidence or reasoning that refutes it. For example, if you are arguing that school uniforms improve student discipline, you might start the refutation paragraph by saying something like: “Some people claim that school uniforms restrict students’ freedom of expression. However, research has shown that uniforms actually enhance a sense of belonging and reduce peer pressure.”

Another approach to refutation is the Rogerian method, which is more empathetic and seeks to find common ground. In this approach, you acknowledge the validity of the opposing argument and then show how your argument is a better solution or compromise. For example, if you are arguing for stricter gun control laws, you might start the refutation paragraph by saying: “While it is true that the Second Amendment guarantees the right to bear arms, it is also important to consider the safety and well-being of all citizens. By implementing common-sense gun control measures, we can protect both individual rights and public safety.”

Whichever approach you choose, it is important to back up your refutation with evidence and examples. Use statistics, studies, expert opinions, and logical reasoning to show why the opposing argument is flawed or lacks merit. This will make your refutation more convincing and strengthen your overall argument.

What is the purpose of the conclusion in an argumentative essay?

The purpose of the conclusion in an argumentative essay is to summarize the main points of the essay and restate the thesis statement, while also leaving a lasting impression on the reader.

Is it necessary to include a conclusion in an argumentative essay?

Yes, it is necessary to include a conclusion in an argumentative essay as it helps to wrap up the essay and provide a sense of closure to the reader.

What are some effective strategies for writing a powerful conclusion in an argumentative essay?

Some effective strategies for writing a powerful conclusion in an argumentative essay include restating the thesis statement, summarizing the main points of the essay, and leaving the reader with a thought-provoking question or a call to action.

How can the conclusion of an argumentative essay leave a lasting impression on the reader?

The conclusion of an argumentative essay can leave a lasting impression on the reader by summarizing the main points of the essay in a clear and concise manner, restating the thesis statement, and providing a thought-provoking question or a call to action that leaves the reader thinking about the topic long after they have finished reading the essay.

What should be included in the final paragraph of an argumentative essay?

The final paragraph of an argumentative essay should include a restated thesis statement, a summary of the main points discussed in the essay, and a thought-provoking question or a call to action that encourages the reader to further consider the topic.

What is the purpose of a conclusion in an argumentative essay?

The purpose of a conclusion in an argumentative essay is to summarize the main points of the essay and restate the thesis statement. It should leave a lasting impression on the reader and provide a sense of closure to the essay.

How should I structure the conclusion of my argumentative essay?

The conclusion of an argumentative essay should follow a specific structure. First, you should restate the thesis statement and summarize the main points of the essay. Then, you should offer a final thought or call to action to leave a strong impression on the reader.

Alex Koliada, PhD

By Alex Koliada, PhD

Alex Koliada, PhD, is a well-known doctor. He is famous for studying aging, genetics, and other medical conditions. He works at the Institute of Food Biotechnology and Genomics. His scientific research has been published in the most reputable international magazines. Alex holds a BA in English and Comparative Literature from the University of Southern California , and a TEFL certification from The Boston Language Institute.

Argumentative Essay Guide

Argumentative Essay Outline

Last updated on: Feb 9, 2023

How to Create a Strong Argumentative Essay Outline?

By: Jared P.

Reviewed By: Jacklyn H.

Published on: Oct 29, 2019

Argumentative Essay Outline

Don’t know how to create a strong outline for a convincing argumentative essay?

The outline for an argumentative essay is similar to other types of essays. These include informative essays, persuasive essays, compare and contrast essays, etc.

The outline for almost all types of essays includes an introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion. To start writing an impactful argumentative essay , you need a topic broad enough to create a strong argument.

In this article, you will learn how to develop a 5 paragraph argumentative essay outline.

Argumentative Essay Outline

On this Page

How to Create an Argumentative Essay Outline?

The standard argumentative essay outline includes the following elements.

Argumentative Essay Introduction

The introduction of your essay is the first thing your reader will see. This is where you provide the reader with the proper background information, educating them about your topic. The reader will decide from the very first sentence if he wants to continue reading your essay further or not.

The opening line of an essay is a hook that sticks the reader to the essay. If the introduction is not interesting, the reader might not continue with the essay.

Here are the key points you should keep in mind while writing the introduction of your argumentative essay.

  • Start With a Hook

Start your introduction with an interesting hook that engages your readers and wants them to stick to your essay. It is not necessary that you have to write an entire paragraph as the hook of your essay.

A single interesting sentence also counts as a hook. You can start your essay with an interesting fact, anecdote, funny story, statistics, or a controversial statement.

The hook you choose depends on the nature of the paper that you’re writing and your audience. Whatever you choose to write, make sure it is catchy to grab the attention of readers.

Check out this article to learn some interesting hook examples and their different types.

  • Explain Your Point of View

Now you have to develop your thoughts related to the topic and explain the significance of the topic to the readers. Explain this part of your essay according to your personal knowledge in a couple of lines in the introductory paragraph.

You can also present the background information on your topic. Making sure that the reader knows what will be discussed throughout the paper. Be careful when sharing information at this stage, as you don’t want to bombard the reader with too much data.

  • Write Down Your Thesis Statement

A thesis statement is the crux of your entire essay written at the end of the introductory paragraph. Write down a strong and clear thesis statement that can be backed by a supportive argument and evidence.

The thesis statement of your essay should explain the main point and purpose of writing your essay.

Your entire essay revolves around the thesis; the body paragraphs present information and evidence to defend your thesis.

Follow the tips mentioned above to write an interesting introduction for your argumentative essay.

It is no surprise that the introduction of any essay holds the most importance. If you start on the wrong foot, the entire essay, along with your hard work, goes in vain.

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Argumentative Essay Introduction Examples

To know more about writing a catchy introduction, review the following argumentative essay introduction examples.

  • After the terrorist attack on World Trade Towers on September 11, 2001, racial profiling was increased. According to the authorities, profiling is the only way to identify terrorists. Some airports started targeting people from a Middle-Eastern background, creating concern about the violation of civil rights. This tactic of screening didn’t seem to work, which made the authorities recommend the use of the National ID card. If every citizen carries his ID card along, it will make the screening process easier. And it will not target individuals based on their looks.
  • Nowadays, students wake up, check their phones, get ready and leave instantly for school or college without any breakfast. Some might believe that having breakfast is not essential to start their day with a healthy meal. Studies have shown that breakfast is the essential meal of your day, especially for students.
  • Most of the public workers around the globe are not given the right to freedom of expression. Not even when they are made to work day and night, violating their working rights. Lack of freedom of expression decreases their morale to perform well at work. Enforcing their right to strike and to speak against such violations will encourage them. Countries all over the world should encourage their workers to go on strike and speak out.

Argumentative Essay Body Paragraphs

The body paragraphs of an argumentative essay hold the following significant components.

  • Counter-argument

Each body paragraph should contain a topic sentence that should then be explained in the paragraph with supporting details.

To present a strong argument, you can separate paragraphs to support or negate the thesis statement.

Present your arguments with supporting evidence to support your claim in one paragraph. Remember that you can’t just state your opinions about a particular issue or subject. To make a strong argument and change people's points of view, you must convince them using strong, authentic facts.

Present the opposing argument in the other paragraph by researching both points of view. Presenting both stances will strengthen the argument created in the essay. Refuting the counterargument will make yours seem more valid.

Another approach can be that first, you can use all the evidence to support your argument. After presenting your side of the argument, you can write a paragraph to refute the opposing side.

There is not a rule that should be applied when it comes to presenting an argument. The choice is yours. Make a decision and go for the method that would be easier for you while presenting your case to the readers.

Just be mindful when collecting the evidence. Only look for credible sources. Let’s look at this example of a claim and its supporting evidence.

Claim:   Closing down fast-food chains can control the number of obese kids in the United States.

Evidence: “A ccording to the analysis of several studies in 2017, it is shown that the percentage of obese kids has increased 11 times from the year 1975. ”

Argumentative Essay Conclusion

The last component of a simple argumentative essay outline in the concluding paragraph. Your conclusion needs to be strong to provide closure to the entire argument presented in your essay.

The goal of a conclusion is to make the readers realize why you picked this topic and how significant it is. Restate your thesis statement and your stance on the topic in conclusion.

A strong conclusion leaves a strong impact on readers. This is the part that your reader will remember once he finishes reading the essay. End your essay with an impactful conclusion so that the audience understands and agrees with your point of view.

Argumentative Essay Conclusion Examples

Here are some argumentative essay conclusion examples to further clarify how to write the conclusion.

  • Physical punishment might be an effective way to discipline kids. However, parents should avoid using this method to a maximum extent. We live in a world where there is already enough violence around us. We don’t need any more of it, and that should start from home. Teach your children to be responsible without using violence.
  • Hence, we cannot say that adults are better learners than children. This quality may vary depending on the enthusiasm and motivational level. The learning capability of an individual cannot be generalized according to their age.
  • Sports play an important role in maintaining health. We will have a healthier society if people involve themselves in sports. However, we need to make sure that the sports we are playing are not threatening our lives. They should be challenging yet exciting.

Now you know everything there is about an argumentative essay outline. To make it easier for you, we have an argumentative essay outline sample to guide you through your essay.

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Argumentative Essay Outline Examples

Here, you can find a sample argumentative essay outline pdf that you can follow to craft a perfect argumentative essay. You can also find numerous argumentative essay examples online for help.

To make writing an outline of an argumentative essay easier, we have also attached a worksheet below. Complete it carefully, and you will master the art of argumentative writing.

Argumentative Essay Outline Worksheet

Argumentative Essay Outline Template

Argumentative Essay Outline Ap Lang

Argumentative Essay Outline Middle School

Argumentative Essay Outline High School

Argumentative Essay Outline College

Gun Control Argumentative Essay Outline

Abortion Argumentative Essay Outline

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MLA Argumentative Essay Outline

If you follow this guideline and the argumentative essay outline sample provided above, the writing process will become simpler. You can easily find some interesting and attention-grabbing argumentative essay topics online for a great start. Regardless of the essay topic, you will end up with a high-quality essay if you follow a proper guide.

While following an outline is important for writing argumentative essays, other essential steps must also be followed.

If you still need help, you can always contact a professional essay writer who will help you write a great essay.

At 5StarEssays.com, we can provide you with the best and on-time ‘ write essay for me? ’ help. Reach out to us and get the best essay writing help from experts.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the main goal of an argumentative essay.

The key purpose of writing an argumentative essay is to establish your position and support it with evidence and reasons.

Can you start an argumentative essay with a question?

Yes, you can either start your essay with a thesis statement or a rhetorical question.

How does evidence help an argumentative essay?

In an argumentative essay, evidence could be a fact, documentation, or testimony. It helps in strengthening the claims presented in the essay.

Jared P.

Masters Essay, Literature

Jared P. is a renowned author and writing service provider with over fifteen years of experience in the publishing industry. He has a Ph.D. degree in English Literature and has spent his entire career helping students achieve their academic goals by providing expert writing assistance.

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Argumentative Essay Outline: Writing Steps & Examples

Argumentative Essay Outline

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An argumentative essay outline is a roadmap for the writer to organize their thoughts, research, and arguments in a clear and logical way. It helps to stay focused on the topic and effectively present arguments. Creating an outline before writing an argumentative essay allows students to identify the key points and evidence that should back up ideas.

Struggling with an argumentative essay outline? Stuck at the beginning or not sure which format to take? It’s okay, you’ll find some explanations and pieces of advice here, as well as an argument outline template you could use. We’ve collected everything you need to know before composing an outline for your top-notch argumentative paper. This page contains information about:

  • The notion of outline and why it is important
  • Specifics of sketching an essay where you defend your position
  • Argument essay layout
  • Several useful tips and examples.

Ready to receive some help with your work? Let’s get you prepared to write an excellent essay!

What Is an Argumentative Essay Outline?

Before starting to work on an argumentative paper outline, it is important to understand its definition and purpose. So, what is the outline for an argumentative essay? Outline for an argumentative essay involves defending one’s position on a certain topic by using logic and factual evidence. It requires doing preliminary research and presenting your findings in sketch form. An argumentative essay outline forms the essay’s basic structure and contains its main elements, briefly described and connected together using logical transitions. Once you finish and review this short version, it will be much easier to spot mistakes and logical gaps. After correcting them, you’ll be one step away from writing a high-quality essay.

Argumentative Essay Outline Format

Setting a correct format for argumentative essay outline is important, as it ensures that the entire composition will be properly organized. This is where you create the logical structure, which can be checked for gaps and mistakes before writing the complete text. A simple argumentative essay outline should be composed like this:

  • Introduction This part contains your main topic description and your thesis statement. The latter should be provided fully, while the other descriptions can be sketchy at this stage. Try using some kind of a ‘hook’ to engage your readers.
  • Body paragraphs It is where you briefly introduce your arguments, as well as counterarguments you aim to refute. Mention your evidence and include your sources, but don’t be too wordy, as this is just a sketch for now.
  • Conclusion It should briefly summarize the argumentation and how it supports your thesis.

More examples of an argumentative essay structure outline are available in our downloadable materials.

Learn more: How to Write an Argumentative Essay Introduction

Types of an Argumentative Essay Outline

Before learning how to write an outline for an argumentative essay, you must figure out which type is best for your specific topic. This information might be specified in your assignment, otherwise, it is up to you. The layout of an argumentative essay you’re writing depends on the persuasive approach you’ve chosen. There are three main types:

  • Classical, also known as Aristotelian

Now let's talk about each argument essay outline type in detail. We’ll show you what the differences between them are and when it is better to choose one or another.

Classical Argumentative Essay Outline

Let’s start with the classical argument outline. It is also named Aristotelian, honoring the memory of the ancient Greek philosopher who perfected the logical method of presenting argumentation. The general structure should follow a 5 paragraph essay format . Here is how you should compose your outline of an argumentative essay when using this structure type:

  • Explain your thesis, making it clear
  • Mention the opposing thesis if there is one
  • List your arguments, referring to evidence you have collected
  • Mention counterarguments, providing evidence that contradicts them
  • Summarize it, showing that your thesis has been proven by your arguments.

This type is used for direct discussions and straightforward topics.

Rogerian Argumentative Essay Outline

In a Rogerian outline for an argumentative essay, you are expected to pay more attention to the opposing viewpoints, considering the strong and weak sides of both. In this case, the paper focuses not on refuting antagonistic argumentation but rather on finding some middle ground. This argumentative essay layout can be used when you’re aiming to help two opposing sides reach a mutual agreement at a certain point. Another situation when you should consider such an approach is when addressing an audience hostile to your viewpoint – for example, when arguing against the rules or habits of a specific group.

Toulmin Argumentative Essay Outline

When your topic needs some complicated analysis on different levels, use the Toulmin outline of an argumentative essay. This model is based on six main elements:

  • Claim – your central statement
  • Grounds – evidence backing the claim
  • Warrant – logical connection between the grounds and the claim
  • Backings – additional arguments strengthening the warrant
  • Qualifier – the measure of certainty in the claim
  • Rebuttal – refutes possible counterarguments to the claim.

This format of argumentative essay outline should be used for refuting existing argumentation against your own claim. If you are struggling with outlining your argumentative essay, re-check its main points. Correcting mistakes early on saves hundreds of working hours. To save even more, consider to buy college essays from professional academic writers. 

Argumentative Essay Outline Template

Have you picked your paper format? If yes, you should be ready to proceed. Need an argumentative outline template? If you still hesitate and search for extra hints, it's fine – there are plenty of them on this page! We’ve prepared a comprehensive argument essay outline template for each of the main types described in the previous section. You can find them below.

Classical Argumentative Essay Outline Template

If your task is to simply present your point of view on a certain subject and back it up with solid facts, you need a classical argument essay outline. This is the most common and straightforward type of structuring your argumentation, so it can be freely used unless your situation requires a different approach. Here is our outline for argumentative essay example:

  • Intriguing description or some wordplay to ‘hook’ your audience
  • Brief context of the problem
  • Your full thesis statement together with an extra explanation if necessary
  • Data set #1
  • Data set #2, etc.
  • Your argument #2: Formatted the same way as the previous one
  • Point out its logical flaws or provide the evidence that refutes it (or refutatio).
  • Briefly mention how this analysis results in reinforcing your own position.
  • Counterargument #2: This and further ones should be formatted in exactly the same way
  • Summarize your argumentation without repeating it and show how it supports your thesis (this part is also known as peroratio).
  • Add some final notes or a call to action to engage your audience.

Rogerian Argumentative Essay Outline Template

When attempting to counter a formidable position, you need to pay great attention to opposing claims. You might want to find some common ground and reach an agreement with the opposing side, and that is what the Rogerian type is meant for. Follow this argument essay template for conducting an extra analysis of conflicting viewpoints:

  • Describe the problem and add brief context if necessary.
  • Explain your own viewpoint on it as well as opposing stances. You might pick the most well-known of them or the one which shares enough common ground with your position if that helps. Highlight this common ground.
  • Give your thesis statement in a full sentence.
  • Explore the evidence which supports it.
  • Analyze the strength of this position, given the quality of evidence. See if it can be refuted.
  • Mention other positions, if any. Follow the same format as used for the first one.
  • Explain that you understand the opposing position and the reasons behind it.
  • Highlight specific details or areas where you have common ground with the opponent.
  • Your argument #1: explain how it is related to your thesis and provide the supporting evidence.
  • Your argument #1: present it in the same format as the 1st one. The same goes for all other arguments.
  • Point out the elements of both positions which you and your opponent could agree upon.
  • Develop a compromising solution that would encompass these agreeable elements from both sides.
  • Summarize the compromise and the arguments from both sides which back it.
  • Explain how both sides could benefit from agreeing upon this common ground position.

Check below for more argumentative essay outline examples.

Toulmin Argumentative Essay Outline Template

This argument template for an essay will be useful in case of facing complicated argumentation, which should be properly analyzed. The Toulmin format outline argumentative essay example is here:

  • Come up with something interesting to ‘hook’ your audience.
  • Provide a brief context of the problem.
  • Give your full thesis statement.
  • Evidence #1, including the logical connection between it and your claim
  • Evidence #2, formatted in the same way, etc.
  • Briefly show how it supports your thesis.
  • Show which of your evidence elements backs this warrant.
  • Provide qualifiers for your argumentation: be open and show its weak sides.
  • Your warrant #2, formatted in the same way, etc.
  • Analyze their claim, evaluating its warrants and qualifiers.
  • Provide your rebuttal.
  • Opposing viewpoint #2, formatted in the same way, etc.
  • Briefly summarize your warrants.
  • Summarize the opposing viewpoints, mentioning how you have refuted them.
  • Show that your thesis is supported better.

How to Write an Argumentative Essay Outline Step-By-Step

Let’s put together all the tips on how to write an argumentative essay outline . This section contains a quick guide that could serve as your argumentative essay planning sheet. Make sure to follow this recommended course when composing an academic paper:

  • Think it through Making an argumentative writing outline efficient and persuasive requires good knowledge of the selected topic. So, choose one you are familiar with. You must be able to explain your position well and defend it successfully. And don’t pick an easy one. It should be interesting enough for your audience to get engaged.
  • Do your research Gather key information about your problem before writing an argumentative essay outline. Check if you have enough evidence to back your claim and refute possible counterarguments. Verify that it clearly shows what you actually need and doesn’t prove an opposing position.
  • Pick a format Given the specifics of the chosen problem, find out which approach will suit you best: Classical, Rogerian, or Toulmin. If you start creating your argumentative essay outline in one format and then realize that you need to switch to another, you might lose a lot of time. Too risky for those who have tight deadlines!
  • Structure it properly Follow the recommended templates and put every argument outline into a separate paragraph. The same applies to introductory sections. Remember that proper formatting increases your essay’s readability and thus serves your cause.
  • Keep it concise Make it brief but understandable, ensuring that all key points and data are mentioned. Remember that you just need to outline an argumentative essay, not write the full text. Besides, writing briefly saves you some precious time.
  • Review and correct Spend some time going through your argumentative research essay outline and check carefully for errors or gaps. Read it to yourself or ask someone else to give it as much critique as possible. If you miss something important now, it will be more difficult to find and correct this mistake later.

These tips should be enough for creating an argumentative essay outline for high school and college. You can check how to write an argumentative essay in one of our guides. But also check the samples we've collected for you – maybe you’ll get some extra ideas for your own work. 

Argumentative Essay Outline Examples

Searching for a real argumentative outline example? We’ve collected several outlines for essays addressing popular questions. Check them out, and hopefully, you’ll draw some inspiration from them, which will help you with your own work. Just don’t copy any of that content, as it would mean plagiarism. Don’t forget about the downloadable argumentative essay outline sample. Scroll down, and you’ll find it. Death Penalty Argument Outline Example

Example of Argumentative Essay Outline on Death Penalty

Sample Outline for Argumentative Essay on Abortion

Sample of Argumentative Essay Outline on Abortion

Argument Essay Outline Example on Human Trafficking

Example of Argument Essay Outline on Human Trafficking

Sample of Argumentative Essay Outline on Gender Equality

Example of Argumentative Essay Outline on Gender Equality

Argumentative Essay Outline Example on Bullying

Example of Argumentative Essay Outline on Bullying

Browse StudyCrumb’s Blog to find complete argumentative essay examples formatted accordingly.

Argumentative Paper Outline Checklist

Here’s also a brief list of what should be written in an outline for an argument:

  • checkbox My thesis statement is full and clear.
  • checkbox I provided the necessary context of the selected problem.
  • checkbox I considered the ‘hook’ in order to engage your audience.
  • checkbox Main arguments that support the thesis are logically connected to each other.
  • checkbox I selected solid evidence backing the arguments.
  • checkbox I planned the main counterarguments , together with their rebuttal based on facts and logic.
  • checkbox My conclusion is going to summarize the strength of my position compared to opposing ones.
  • checkbox My argument writing template includes a strong call to action and gives some food for thought.

Bottom Line on Argumentative Essay Outline

We have shown in detail how to outline an argumentative essay and what are main structure types you could use for it, namely:

We have also listed what should an outline for an argumentative essay include, particularly:

  • Introduction with context and a ‘hook’
  • Thesis statement
  • Arguments with supporting evidence
  • Counterarguments with their rebuttal
  • Conclusion.

An argumentative writing template has also been provided. We believe that this information will help you complete an excellent paper on any argumentative essay topic .  If you are still unsure about your writing skills, StudyCrumb got you covered. Remember this phrase — " write an argumentative essay for me ." It's a secret pass to tell our Support reps. Say it, and the magic will happen.

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FAQ About Argumentative Essay Outline

1. why is it important to create an argumentative essay outline.

Writing an argument essay outline helps to form its layout and properly place the main elements: thesis, background, arguments, evidence, and conclusion. It serves as an argumentative essay plan with logical transitions between the key elements. Now you can read this draft version again and spot any inconsistencies before composing the full-text version. That is a much easier task.

3. What should be included in the outline for an argument?

Your argument outline needs to include the following:

  • Analysis of certain aspects of the problem which you could use to clearly maintain your point
  • Logic and reasoning to defend your position using your debate skills
  • Solid evidence retrieved from credible sources to back your claim
  • Visible connection to your thesis and your other arguments, otherwise, your audience might have an issue with understanding your essay.

2. What should include a strong outline for an argumentative essay?

A strong outline for an argumentative essay should include:

  • Strong thesis, preferably about an interesting and controversial problem
  • Proper arguments backed by logic and solid evidence
  • Credible sources you can obtain the evidence from
  • Proper rebuttal for counterarguments, pointing at their weak sides
  • Logical connection between all parts of your outline
  • Conclusion, which summarizes all arguments and rebuttals, showing that your thesis is maintained.

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  1. How to Form an Argumentative Essay Outline

    So in this quick guide, we explain how to make an effective argumentative essay outline, covering all three major formats: Classical (Aristotelian), Rogerian, and Toulmin. We'll also include argumentative essay outline examples and templates to help you understand what works. Communicate with confidence. Grammarly helps you communicate effectively

  2. How to Write an Argumentative Essay

    When do you write an argumentative essay? You might be assigned an argumentative essay as a writing exercise in high school or in a composition class. The prompt will often ask you to argue for one of two positions, and may include terms like "argue" or "argument." It will frequently take the form of a question.

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    1. How To Write An Argumentative Essay Outline? 2. Types of Arguments and Argumentative Essay Outlines 3. Argumentative Essay Outline Examples How To Write An Argumentative Essay Outline? A simple argumentative essay outline follows the same structure as any other type of essay. The difference lies in the content of the body paragraphs.

  4. How to Write an Essay Outline

    Revised on July 23, 2023. An essay outline is a way of planning the structure of your essay before you start writing. It involves writing quick summary sentences or phrases for every point you will cover in each paragraph, giving you a picture of how your argument will unfold.

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    Step 1: Select a topic. Step 2: Identify a position. Step 3: Locate appropriate resources. Step 4: Identify evidence supporting the position. ( NOTE: If there is little evidence in support of the claim, consider re-examining the main argument.) Steps to write an argumentative essay When gathering evidence, use credible sources.

  6. How to Create a Powerful Argumentative Essay Outline

    Introduction Key arguments Counterargument and rebuttal Conclusion That's not so bad, is it? There's really nothing to be afraid of. Here's how your argumentative essay outline would look if you turned it into a pretty picture: Let's break down the four elements and take a look at what needs to be incorporated into each.

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    The argumentative essay is a genre of writing that requires the student to investigate a topic; collect, generate, and evaluate evidence; and establish a position on the topic in a concise manner. Please note: Some confusion may occur between the argumentative essay and the expository essay.

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  9. How to Write a Good Argumentative Essay: Easy Step-by-Step Guide

    1. Introductory paragraph. The first paragraph of your essay should outline the topic, provide background information necessary to understand your argument, outline the evidence you will present and states your thesis. 2. The thesis statement. This is part of your first paragraph. It is a concise, one-sentence summary of your main point and claim.

  10. How to Write a Standout Argumentative Essay

    Write with Grammarly Argumentative essays are only as good as their argument, and structuring good arguments requires a little more than just being stubborn (even if it helps!). Below, we run through the most useful techniques for writing the perfect argumentative essay. But don't take our word for it—our evidence speaks for itself!

  11. How to Create an Outline for an Argumentative Paper: 7 Steps

    As you generate new ideas and make new logical connections, the scope of your paper will likely change and as a result so should your thesis. 2. Brainstorm. List anything that you believe is related to the argument, including quotes from primary and secondary sources. 3.

  12. How to Create a Powerful Argumentative Essay Outline: Step-by-Step Guide

    How to create an argumentative essay outline. 1. Start with a clear thesis statement: Your thesis statement should clearly state your main argument or claim. 2. Break down your argument into key points: Identify the main points or arguments that support your thesis statement. These points will form the backbone of your essay and will serve as ...

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    1. How to Write an Argumentative Essay Outline? 2. Types of Arguments 3. Argumentative Essay Outline Examples How to Write an Argumentative Essay Outline? An argumentative essay outline is a plan through which the writer works and organizes the raw data. An outline provides a track to follow for your papers and essays.

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  17. How to write an effective outline for an argumentative essay

    Read time: 8min Table of Contents Argumentative essay outline toolkit How to write an outline for an argumentative essay Argumentative essay outline toolkit Once you are done with these steps, this is what your structure will look like Title: Why is socialism important for a co-operative society Introduction

  18. Argumentative Essay: Definition, Outline & Examples of ...

    The argumentative essay is one which is used to present an argument surrounding two side of any particular issue. The essay can be written as a way of presenting both sides of the argument as equal or it might be written with one side taking preference over the other. This would be done when the writer has a specific opinion on the topic.

  19. How to Write an Essay Outline in 4 Steps

    3 Identify the points you'll make in each paragraph. Using the list of points you wrote down, identify the key arguments you'll make in your essay. These will be your body sections. For example, in an argumentative essay about why your campus needs to install more water fountains, you might make points like:

  20. Argumentative Essay: Topics, Outline and Writing Tips

    An argumentative essay is a paper that gets the reader to recognize the author's side of the argument as valid. The purpose of this specific essay is to pose a question and answer it with compelling evidence. At its core, this essay type works to champion a specific viewpoint. The key, however, is that the topic of the argumentative essay has ...

  21. Structure & Outline

    The outline of an argumentative essay should include an introduction with thesis statement, 3 main body paragraphs with supporting evidence and opposing viewpoints with evidence to disprove, along with an conclusion. The example below is just a basic outline and structure. Outline: I. Introduction: tells what you are going to write about. Basic ...

  22. How to Write an Argumentative Essay (Examples Included)

    Developing an argument requires a significant understanding of the subject matter from all angles. Let's take a look at the steps to writing an argumentative essay: 1. Choose appropriate argumentative essay topics. Although topics for an argumentative essay are highly diverse, they are based on a controversial stance.

  23. How to Write an Argumentative Essay: Topics, Outline, Example

    Argumentative Essay Outline. Just like other 5-paragraph essays, an argumentative essay outline should have an introduction, body paragraphs (for arguments and counter-arguments), and a conclusion. You should carefully organize and structure your persuasive essay. It will help the reader to understand your point.

  24. Argumentative Essay Conclusion

    Learn the purpose of an argumentative essay conclusion and how to write it. See how to restate a thesis and how to use an argumentative essay...

  25. PHI105 T4 Outline Worksheet Persuasive Essay Planning

    4) Write a concluding sentence under the "Conclusion" heading in the outline below. a) Your concluding sentence should be your thesis restated in different words. 5) Make sure to complete reference portion of the outline. Scroll Down Persuasive Essay Outline Introductory Paragraph: Hook: How we view marijuana?