Literacy Ideas

The Ultimate Guide to Opinion Writing for Students and Teachers

opinion writing 8th grade

The Importance of Opinion Writing

Encouraging our students to express their personal opinions is an important part of the learning process; healthy even. To do this effectively, it is equally important that we help them acquire the necessary skills to express these opinions in a reasoned and coherent manner when teaching opinion writing.

Writing is one of the best possible vehicles for our students not only to express their opinions but to explore the strength and validity of those opinions.

CONSIDERATIONS BEFORE WRITING AN OPINION ESSAY

For our students to competently express their opinions in writing, they must first understand the specific requirements of the type of question they are answering. Of course, there are many types of questions and fun opinion writing prompts that are geared towards coaxing personal opinions from a student and each will require its own specific tailored response.

It’s clear that personal opinions permeate a wide range of genres and media. We find opinions everywhere from hotel reviews and infomercials to political commentary and newspaper editorials. But, despite the diversity of forms opinion writing can take, we can helpfully identify some general criteria that will assist our students in navigating the challenge of most opinion writing prompts and questions.

Let’s take a look at some of these criteria in more detail.

A COMPLETE UNIT FOR TEACHING OPINION WRITING

opinion writing | opinion writing unit 1 | The Ultimate Guide to Opinion Writing for Students and Teachers | literacyideas.com

Teach your students to write EXCELLENT PERSUASIVE ESSAYS and master INFLUENTIAL WRITING SKILLS using PROVEN TEACHING STRATEGIES with this 140-PAGE UNIT.

ALL RESOURCES AND ASSESSMENT TOOLS INCLUDED – NO PREP REQUIRED.

30+ 5-star Ratings ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

OPINION WRITING CRITERIA TO ADDRESS

1. identify the audience: speak clearly.

Writing is about language and language is about communication; students should understand that we do not write in a vacuum. The purpose of an essay, letter, or any other form of writing we care to name, is ultimately to be read.

This means that it is essential that consideration be given to the character of the intended audience. Also, remind students that when they are writing, the reader is not privy to the inner workings of the writer’s mind. They must make their thoughts explicit in their writing and ensure that these thoughts are expressed in a coherent manner.

The student writer should always avoid making the assumption that the reader knows things that are not expressed explicitly in the writing.

2. Take a Stance: Stand Firm

From the very outset, the student should state their position boldly. More than that, they must stand firm in that opinion throughout the entirety of the piece.

Opinion writing is not about communicating a series of pros and cons or discussing at length the various related advantages and disadvantages, the place for that is not here. The opinion piece should open with a bold statement of opinion that is clearly expressed, and that opinion should be held unwaveringly and reinforced constantly throughout the text.

As with many other writing genres , employing a hook to grab the reader’s attention is good practice too. This hook can take the form of a quotation, an anecdote, a statistic, or even a joke. Whatever form the hook takes, it should reveal the writer’s take on things too.

To summarize, whatever the topic and however the student opens their opinion piece, they should ensure they express their opinion immediately and coherently. There should be no doubt in the reader’s mind as to where the student-writer stands on the issue.

3. Choose Appropriate Evidence: Back It Up

There is no doubt that subjectivity is an important aspect of opinion writing in general. That does not mean, however, that opinions do not need to be substantiated.

Your students will need to recognize that each and every statement of opinion will need to be supported by appropriate evidence. This will also help students to develop their critical reading skills as they will be able to better recognize when unsubstantiated claims are made by other writers. Opinions backed up with evidence help lead the reader along the writer’s pathways of thought; making the writing more convincing as a whole.

This evidence can take a wide variety of forms, ranging from personal anecdotes and quotations to statistics and references to scientific studies. Students should also always be encouraged to choose evidence that is broadly suited to the subject they are writing about.

4. Draw Conclusions: Wrap It Up

In the well-organized piece of opinion writing, as with many other types of extended writing, the writing should be structured in paragraphs. Paragraphs are essential elements of good writing organization.

Generally speaking, an opening paragraph gives way to body paragraphs. These body paragraphs, or development paragraphs, describe in more detail the ideas laid out in the initial opening paragraph by further exploring, explaining, and providing supporting evidence for each point.

The final concluding paragraph serves to close the circle by restating the central points in a closing endeavor to drive home the writer’s opinion.

5. A Word on Words

Writing is an art form. Attention to detail is important. But, it isn’t only important to look at the big picture things like structure, students should be encouraged to shift their focus from the text level down to the word and sentence levels too. In an opinion piece, strong, forceful verbs should be the order of the day. There is little space for passive forms when engaged in the construction of convincing arguments.

Things should be kept interesting too. Students should vary their sentence structures grammatically and in length. Variety is key.

 As always in writing, editing should be emphasized. The editing process polishes the well-wrought opinion piece by putting the final gloss on the student’s work.

The OREO Opinion Writing Process Explained

As with all genres, there’s a lot to remember here and acronyms are a helpful way to commit these important things to memory. Luckily, few things can be easier to commit to memory than the name of a delicious cookie:

O – Opinion

R – Reasons

E – Evidence or Examples

O – Opinion (restated)

This memorable acronym will help students remember some of the main elements of opinion writing as outlined above. But, sometimes the hardest thing for students to do is to get the writing ball rolling.

opinion writing | 4 opinion writing28129 | The Ultimate Guide to Opinion Writing for Students and Teachers | literacyideas.com

Opinionated Sentence Starters

Sentence starters provide students with great ways to kick-start their writing. Reminding students of simple ways of introducing opinion sentences can be helpful. Here are a few for ‘starters’ for starters:

●     In my opinion…

●     I think that…

●     It seems to me that…

●     It appears to me…

●     I feel that…

opinion writing | 1 0001 sentence structure guide for teachers and students | The Ultimate Guide to Opinion Writing for Students and Teachers | literacyideas.com

Once the student-writer has effectively expressed their opinion on a matter, they then will need to provide the reader with the reasons for why they think what they think. In an essay, these reasons will usually be found in the body paragraphs or development paragraphs. Normally, these paragraphs will explore a single reason each.

Some helpful sentence starters for introducing these reasons include:

●     One reason I feel this way is…

●     Evidence to support this can be found in…

●     I believe this to evident in…

Opinion Writing Activities for Students

Students will certainly need practice completing sustained pieces of opinion writing, but some of the most valuable activities to help students evolve their opinion writing abilities barely require a pen to be put to paper.

While the following two activities do not require students to engage in extended pieces of writing, the activities below will assist students in grasping some essential concepts. These activities demonstrate good practice through modelling and also encourage dialogue, discussion, and debate as a means to strengthen opinion writing.

Activity 1: Opinion Writing – What Is It?

This exercise is a good follow-up to introductory work outlining the criteria of opinion writing as described above.

●     Start by passing out copies of a piece of opinion writing you have selected to read with the class. Read the text aloud as the students follow along with their copy. The opinion text chosen can come from a wide range of genres, including advertisements, letters, editorials, essays, articles, or reviews.

●     Assign students a talking partner and instruct students to take five minutes to identify the various criteria employed in the text. Encourage students to mark and annotate their copies of the text accordingly. You may even wish to supply students with a checklist compiled from the criteria mentioned previously in this article.

●     As a whole class, discuss how successfully the text fulfills the criteria. What did the writer do well? What could they have done better? You can record their responses on the whiteboard.

The aim of this exercise is for students to hone their critical faculties while internalizing the criteria. This will reap rewards when the students later engage in their own extended opinion writing.

Activity 2: The Collaborative Case

This activity employs collaboration to help students build a stronger case for their opinion on a divisive issue.

●     First, define the parameters of the exercise by presenting an either/or conundrum to the class. This doesn’t have to be overly controversial in nature, just stated in such a way that it forces the students to take one side or another. This could be stated simply as a choice, e.g. Dogs or cats? City or countryside? Beach or Mountains? Sweet or savory?

●     Students then divide into two groups according to their stated preferences. In their groups, they then discuss and compile as many supporting reasons for their choice as they can come up with. As a group, they will discuss the relative merits of each reason, before agreeing on their top five.

●     The groups then share their reasons in a debate format, using arguments and counter-arguments, leading into an open, free-ranging discussion.

The value of this exercise lies in the collaborative and ‘combative’ natures of the exercises. Just as our physical muscles can grow through resistance, so too can the strength and resilience of our opinions and arguments.

This activity can also be used as a lead-in to opinion writing as it works well as a prewriting preparation exercise. The complexity of the issue to be discussed and debated can easily be modified to suit the abilities of the students too.

A COMPLETE UNIT ON TEACHING FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE

opinion writing | figurative language Unit 1 | The Ultimate Guide to Opinion Writing for Students and Teachers | literacyideas.com

❤️The use of  FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE  is like  “SPECIAL EFFECTS FOR AUTHORS.”  It is a powerful tool to create  VIVID IMAGERY  through words. This  HUGE 110 PAGE UNIT  guides you through a complete understanding of  FIGURATIVE LANGUAGE  as both a  READER  and  WRITER covering.

OPINION WRITING VIDEO TUTORIALS

These videos from teaching without frills are an excellent starting point for opinion writing. You can view the entire collection here.

opinion writing | 4 opinion writing28229 | The Ultimate Guide to Opinion Writing for Students and Teachers | literacyideas.com

  The Wrap Up

Opinion writing is a higher-level skill that makes many demands on our students. It will challenge them to move beyond parroting the facts and figures they have acquired in their learning to formulate their own thoughts on topics they have learned about in class, or in the wider world beyond the school gates.

It will make demands on their skill as writers too. Our students must learn to mold and mechanically manipulate the language on the page to express their beliefs persuasively and effectively. To do this successfully, they will need ample opportunities to practice their writing craft. Once a firm understanding of the structures involved has been established, the student can become more fluid in their expression. They will add art and flair to their craft. But first, they must build on these firm foundations.

OTHER GREAT ARTICLES RELATED TO OPINION WRITING

opinion writing | PersuasiveWritingSkills | Top 5 Persuasive Writing Techniques for Students | literacyideas.com

Top 5 Persuasive Writing Techniques for Students

opinion writing | persuasiveWriting | 5 Top Persuasive Writing Lesson Plans for Students and Teachers | literacyideas.com

5 Top Persuasive Writing Lesson Plans for Students and Teachers

opinion writing | LEarn how to write a perfect persuasive essay | How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps | literacyideas.com

How to Write Perfect Persuasive Essays in 5 Simple Steps

opinion writing | persuasive writing prompts | 23 Persuasive writing Topics for High School students | literacyideas.com

23 Persuasive writing Topics for High School students

opinion writing | how to write a winning speech | How to Write a Winning Debate Speech | literacyideas.com

How to Write a Winning Debate Speech

The content for this page has been written by Shane Mac Donnchaidh.  A former principal of an international school and English university lecturer with 15 years of teaching and administration experience. Shane’s latest Book, The Complete Guide to Nonfiction Writing , can be found here.  Editing and support for this article have been provided by the literacyideas team.

  • Share full article

Advertisement

Supported by

Over 170 Prompts to Inspire Writing and Discussion

Here are all of our Student Opinion questions from the 2020-21 school year. Each question is based on a different New York Times article, interactive feature or video.

opinion writing 8th grade

By The Learning Network

Each school day we publish a new Student Opinion question, and students use these writing prompts to reflect on their experiences and identities and respond to current events unfolding around them. To introduce each question, we provide an excerpt from a related New York Times article or Opinion piece as well as a free link to the original article.

During the 2020-21 school year, we asked 176 questions, and you can find them all below or here as a PDF . The questions are divided into two categories — those that provide opportunities for debate and persuasive writing, and those that lend themselves to creative, personal or reflective writing.

Teachers can use these prompts to help students practice narrative and persuasive writing, start classroom debates and even spark conversation between students around the world via our comments section. For more ideas on how to use our Student Opinion questions, we offer a short tutorial along with a nine-minute video on how one high school English teacher and her students use this feature .

Questions for Debate and Persuasive Writing

1. Should Athletes Speak Out On Social and Political Issues? 2. Should All Young People Learn How to Invest in the Stock Market? 3. What Are the Greatest Songs of All Time? 4. Should There Be More Gender Options on Identification Documents? 5. Should We End the Practice of Tipping? 6. Should There Be Separate Social Media Apps for Children? 7. Do Marriage Proposals Still Have a Place in Today’s Society? 8. How Do You Feel About Cancel Culture? 9. Should the United States Decriminalize the Possession of Drugs? 10. Does Reality TV Deserve Its Bad Rap? 11. Should the Death Penalty Be Abolished? 12. How Should Parents Support a Student Who Has Fallen Behind in School? 13. When Is It OK to Be a Snitch? 14. Should People Be Required to Show Proof of Vaccination? 15. How Much Have You and Your Community Changed Since George Floyd’s Death? 16. Can Empathy Be Taught? Should Schools Try to Help Us Feel One Another’s Pain? 17. Should Schools or Employers Be Allowed to Tell People How They Should Wear Their Hair? 18. Is Your Generation Doing Its Part to Strengthen Our Democracy? 19. Should Corporations Take Political Stands? 20. Should We Rename Schools Named for Historical Figures With Ties to Racism, Sexism or Slavery? 21. How Should Schools Hold Students Accountable for Hurting Others? 22. What Ideas Do You Have to Improve Your Favorite Sport? 23. Are Presidential Debates Helpful to Voters? Or Should They Be Scrapped? 24. Is the Electoral College a Problem? Does It Need to Be Fixed? 25. Do You Care Who Sits on the Supreme Court? Should We Care? 26. Should Museums Return Looted Artifacts to Their Countries of Origin? 27. Should Schools Provide Free Pads and Tampons? 28. Should Teachers Be Allowed to Wear Political Symbols? 29. Do You Think People Have Gotten Too Relaxed About Covid? 30. Who Do You Think Should Be Person of the Year for 2020? 31. How Should Racial Slurs in Literature Be Handled in the Classroom? 32. Should There Still Be Snow Days? 33. What Are Your Reactions to the Storming of the Capitol by a Pro-Trump Mob? 34. What Do You Think of the Decision by Tech Companies to Block President Trump? 35. If You Were a Member of Congress, Would You Vote to Impeach President Trump? 36. What Would You Do First if You Were the New President? 37. Who Do You Hope Will Win the 2020 Presidential Election? 38. Should Media Literacy Be a Required Course in School? 39. What Are Your Reactions to the Results of Election 2020? Where Do We Go From Here? 40. How Should We Remember the Problematic Actions of the Nation’s Founders? 41. As Coronavirus Cases Surge, How Should Leaders Decide What Stays Open and What Closes? 42. What Is Your Reaction to the Inauguration of Joe Biden and Kamala Harris? 43. How Worried Should We Be About Screen Time During the Pandemic? 44. Should Schools Be Able to Discipline Students for What They Say on Social Media? 45. What Works of Art, Culture and Technology Flopped in 2020? 46. How Do You Feel About Censored Music? 47. Why Do You Think ‘Drivers License’ Became Such a Smash Hit? 48. Justice Ginsburg Fought for Gender Equality. How Close Are We to Achieving That Goal? 49. How Well Do You Think Our Leaders Have Responded to the Coronavirus Crisis? 50. To What Extent Is the Legacy of Slavery and Racism Still Present in America in 2020? 51. How Should We Reimagine Our Schools So That All Students Receive a Quality Education? 52. How Concerned Do You Think We Should Be About the Integrity of the 2020 Election? 53. What Issues in This Election Season Matter Most to You? 54. Is Summer School a Smart Way to Make Up for Learning Lost This School Year? 55. What Is Your Reaction to the Senate’s Acquittal of Former President Trump? 56. What Is the Worst Toy Ever? 57. How Should We Balance Safety and Urgency in Developing a Covid-19 Vaccine? 58. What Are Your Reactions to Oprah’s Interview With Harry and Meghan? 59. Should the Government Provide a Guaranteed Income for Families With Children? 60. Should There Be More Public Restrooms? 61. Should High School-Age Basketball Players Be Able to Get Paid? 62. Should Team Sports Happen This Year? 63. Who Are the Best Musical Artists of the Past Year? What Are the Best Songs? 64. Should We Cancel Student Debt? 65. How Closely Should Actors’ Identities Reflect the Roles They Play? 66. Should White Writers Translate a Black Author’s Work? 67. Would You Buy an NFT? 68. Should Kids Still Learn to Tell Time? 69. Should All Schools Teach Financial Literacy? 70. What Is Your Reaction to the Verdict in the Derek Chauvin Trial? 71. What Is the Best Way to Stop Abusive Language Online? 72. What Are the Underlying Systems That Hold a Society Together? 73. What Grade Would You Give President Biden on His First 100 Days? 74. Should High Schools Post Their Annual College Lists? 75. Are C.E.O.s Paid Too Much? 76. Should We Rethink Thanksgiving? 77. What Is the Best Way to Get Teenagers Vaccinated? 78. Do You Want Your Parents and Grandparents to Get the New Coronavirus Vaccine? 79. What Is Your Reaction to New Guidelines That Loosen Mask Requirements? 80. Who Should We Honor on Our Money? 81. Is Your School’s Dress Code Outdated? 82. Does Everyone Have a Responsibility to Vote? 83. How Is Your Generation Changing Politics?

Questions for Creative and Personal Writing

84. What Does Your Unique Style Say About You? 85. How Do You Spend Your Downtime? 86. Would You Want to Live to 200? 87. How Do You Connect to Your Heritage? 88. What Do You Think Are the Secrets to Happiness? 89. Are You a Sneakerhead? 90. What Role Have Mentors Played in Your Life? 91. If You Could Make Your Own Podcast, What Would It Be About? 92. Have You Ever Felt Pressure to ‘Sell Your Pain’? 93. Do You Think You Make Good Climate Choices? 94. What Does TikTok Mean to You? 95. Do Your Parents Overpraise You? 96. Do You Want to Travel in Space? 97. Do You Feel You’re Friends With Celebrities or Influencers You Follow Online? 98. Would You Eat Food Grown in a Lab? 99. What Makes You Cringe? 100. What Volunteer Work Would You Most Like to Do? 101. How Do You Respond When People Ask, ‘Where Are You From?’ 102. Has a School Assignment or Activity Ever Made You Uncomfortable? 103. How Does Your Identity Inform Your Political Beliefs and Values? 104. Are You an Orchid, a Tulip or a Dandelion? 105. Are You Having a Tough Time Maintaining Friendships These Days? 106. How Is Your Mental Health These Days? 107. Do You Love Writing or Receiving Letters? 108. What Has Television Taught You About Social Class? 109. Are You Easily Distracted? 110. What Objects Bring You Comfort? 111. What Is Your Favorite Memory of PBS? 112. Have You Ever Felt Embarrassed by Your Parents? 113. What Are You Doing to Combat Pandemic Fatigue? 114. Have You Ever Worried About Making a Good First Impression? 115. What Do You Want Your Parents to Know About What It’s Like to Be a Teenager During the Pandemic? 116. How Have You Collaborated From a Distance During the Pandemic? 117. How Important Is It to You to Have Similar Political Beliefs to Your Family and Friends? 118. How Are You Feeling About Winter This Year? 119. Which Celebrity Performer Would You Like to Challenge to a Friendly Battle? 120. How Mentally Tough Are You? 121. What Smells Trigger Powerful Memories for You? 122. What Are You Thankful for This Year? 123. Do You Miss Hugs? 124. Are You a Good Conversationalist? 125. What Habits Have You Started or Left Behind in 2020? 126. What Was the Best Art and Culture You Experienced in 2020? 127. What’s Your Relationship With Masks? 128. What Role Does Religion Play in Your Life? 129. How Will You Be Celebrating the Holidays This Year? 130. What Is Something Good That Happened in 2020? 131. What New Flavor Ideas Do You Have for Your Favorite Foods? 132. What Are Your Hopes and Concerns for the New School Year? 133. How Has 2020 Challenged or Changed You? 134. What Do You Hope for Most in 2021? 135. How Do You View Death? 136. What Is Your Favorite Fact You Learned in 2020? 137. What Are the Places in the World That You Love Most? 138. Have You Ever Experienced ‘Impostor Syndrome’? 139. How Well Do You Get Along With Your Siblings? 140. Do You Talk to Your Family About the Cost of College? 141. Do You Have a Healthy Diet? 142. How Do You Feel About Mask-Slipping? 143. Do You Believe in Manifesting? 144. How Do You Express Yourself Creatively? 145. What Are Your Family’s House Rules During the Covid Crisis? 146. What Online Communities Do You Participate In? 147. Have You Experienced Any Embarrassing Zoom Mishaps? 148. What Does Your Country’s National Anthem Mean to You? 149. Are Sports Just Not the Same Without Spectators in the Stands? 150. Would You Volunteer for a Covid-19 Vaccine Trial? 151. What ‘Old’ Technology Do You Think Is Cool? 152. Have You Ever Tried to Grow Something? 153. How Has the Pandemic Changed Your Relationship to Your Body? 154. How Do You Find New Books, Music, Movies or Television Shows? 155. Are You Nervous About Returning to Normal Life? 156. How Do You Celebrate Spring? 157. How Do You Talk With People Who Don’t Share Your Views? 158. Would You Want to Be a Teacher Someday? 159. What Would You Recommend That Is ‘Overlooked and Underappreciated’? 160. What Children’s Books Have Had the Biggest Impact on You? 161. What Is Your Gender Identity? 162. Have You Hit a Wall? 163. What Is the Code You Live By? 164. Do You Think You Have Experienced ‘Learning Loss’ During the Pandemic? 165. What Are the Most Memorable Things You’ve Seen or Experienced in Nature? 166. Do You Want to Have Children Someday? 167. What Have You Learned About Friendship This Year? 168. What Seemingly Mundane Feats Have You Accomplished? 169. Has a Celebrity Ever Convinced You to Do Something? 170. How Have You Commemorated Milestones During the Pandemic? 171. How Often Do You Read, Watch or Listen to Things Outside of Your Comfort Zone? 172. Do You Think You Live in a Political Bubble? 173. What Is Your Relationship With the Weight-Loss Industry? 174. What Have You Made This Year? 175. How Are You Right Now? 176. What Are You Grateful For?

Want more writing prompts?

You can find even more Student Opinion questions in our 300 Questions and Images to Inspire Argument Writing , 550 Prompts for Narrative and Personal Writing and 130 New Prompts for Argumentative Writing . We also publish daily Picture Prompts , which are image-centered posts that provide space for many different kinds of writing. You can find all of our writing prompts, added as they publish, here .

49 Opinion Writing Prompts for Students

  • Lesson Plans
  • Grading Students for Assessment
  • Becoming A Teacher
  • Assessments & Tests
  • Elementary Education
  • Special Education
  • Homeschooling

opinion writing 8th grade

One of the most common essay types is the opinion, or persuasive, essay. In an opinion essay , the writer states a point of view, then provides facts and reasoned arguments to support that viewpoint. The goal of the essay is to convince the reader to share the writer’s opinion.

Students aren't always aware of how many strong opinions they already hold. Use the following opinion writing prompts to inspire them to start thinking and writing persuasively.

Prompts About School and Sports

School- and sports-related topics often elicit strong opinions in students. Use these writing prompts to kick off the brainstorming process.

  • Ch-ch-ch-changes . What is one thing about your school that needs to change? Is bullying an issue? Do students need longer breaks or a dress code? Choose one vital issue that needs to change and convince school leaders to make it happen.
  • Special guest. Your school is trying to decide on a famous person to give a speech or presentation to students. Who do you think they should choose? Write an essay to convince your principal.
  • Oxford or bust. Is the Oxford comma essential or obsolete?
  • Scribble scrabble. Do students still need to learn cursive handwriting?
  • Co-ed conflict. Would students perform better if more schools were single-gender rather than co-ed? Why or why not?
  • Participation awards. Should there be winners and losers in sports, or is participation the ultimate goal?
  • Homework overload. Write an essay to convince your teacher to assign less homework.
  • Sports. Which sport (or team) is the best? What makes it better than the others?
  • No slacking . Write an essay persuading a fellow student to do their homework.
  • Class trip. This year, students get to vote on where to go for a class trip. Write an essay convincing your fellow students to vote for the place you’d like to go.
  • Superlatives. Which would you rather be: a top student, a talented athlete, or an accomplished artist?
  • Virtual athletes . Video games competitions are often aired on TV and treated like sports competitions. Should video games be considered sports?
  • Class debate. Should classes that students may not use or that don’t interest them (such as physical education or foreign language) be required?

Prompts About Relationships

Friendships, dating, and other relationships can be both rewarding and exasperating. These writing prompts about relationships will help students explore their feelings about both the positive and the negative moments.

  • Snitch. Your best friend tells you about his plan to cheat on a test. Should you tell an adult? Why or why not?
  • Give it a chance. Your best friend is convinced that she would hate your favorite book, even though she's never read it. Convince her to read it.
  • Friendships vs. relationships. Are friendships or romantic relationships more important in life? Why?
  • Driving age. What age do kids start driving in your state? Is that age too old, too young, or just right? Why?
  • Truth or consequences. Your best friend asks your opinion about something, but you know that a truthful answer will hurt her feelings. What do you do?
  • Who chooses? Your best friend is visiting, and you want to watch TV together, but his favorite show is at the same time as your favorite show. Convince him that your show is a better choice.
  • Fun times. What is the most fun thing you and your best friend have ever experienced together? Why does it deserve the top spot?
  • Dating. Are long-term dating relationships good or bad for teens?
  • New friends. You want to spend time with a new student at school, but your best friend is jealous. Convince your friend of the importance of including the newcomer.
  • Be mine. Is Valentine’s Day worthwhile or just a scheme for the greeting card and chocolate industry to make more money?
  • Debbie Downer. Should you cut ties with friends or relatives who are always negative?
  • He loves me not. Is it really better to have loved and lost than never to have loved at all?
  • Elders. Should you respect your elders merely because they are older, or is respect something that must be earned?

Prompts About Family, Pets, and Leisure Time

The following writing prompts related to family, furry friends, and free time will help students reflect on preferences, ethics, and integrity.

  • Self-reflection. This time, you're the one who needs convincing! Write an essay to persuade yourself to start a healthy habit (or kick a bad habit).
  • Paper wars. Should toilet paper hang with the loose end resting on the top of the roll or hanging from the bottom?
  • Movie vs. book. Choose a book that has been made into a movie. Which version is better, and why?
  • Weekend wanderings . Do you prefer to stay home on the weekends or get out and do things around town? Write an essay to convince your parents to let you do what you prefer this weekend.
  • Sweepstakes. A travel agency is hosting an essay contest to give away an all-expenses-paid trip to the one place in the world you’d most love to visit. Craft a winning essay that convinces them they need to choose you.
  • Zoo debate. Is it ethical to keep animals in zoos? Why or why not?
  • Presence of pets. Should there be limits on the types of places pets can go (e.g. airplanes or restaurants)? Why or why not?
  • Inspiring stories. What is the most inspiring book you’ve ever read? Why is it so inspiring?
  • Dollar discovery. You find a $20 bill in the parking lot of a crowded store. Is it okay to keep it, or should you turn it in to customer service?
  • Vacation day. What is the very best way to spend an unexpected day off from school and why is it the best?
  • Digital or print? Is it better to read books in print or digitally? Why?

Prompts About Society and Technology

The people and technology around us have a significant impact on our lives. These writing prompts encourage students to consider the effect that society and technological advances have on our day-to-day lives.

  • Reverse technology. Pick one technological advancement that you think the world would be better off without. Explain your reasoning and persuade the reader.
  • Out of this world . Do aliens exist? Why or why not?
  • Social media. Is social media good or bad for society? Why?
  • Emoji. Has the use of emoji stunted our ability to express ourselves in writing, or does it help us identify our emotions more precisely?
  • Auto safety. Have advancements like self-driving cars, blind spot indicators, and lane departure warning systems made driving safer, or have they just made drivers less attentive?
  • Exploration Mars. Write a letter to Elon Musk convincing him that you should be part of a colony to Mars.
  • Fundraisers. Is it okay for kids to stand outside stores and ask shoppers for money for their sports teams, clubs, or band? Why or why not?
  • Inventions. What is the greatest invention ever made? Why is it the best?
  • Important cause. In your opinion, what global problem or issue deserves more attention than it currently receives? Why should more time and money be invested in this cause?
  • Minimalism. Does living a minimalist lifestyle make for a happier life? Why or why not?
  • Gaming gains. Are video games generally a positive or a negative influence? Why?
  • Rose-colored glasses. Is the current decade the best era in history? Why or why not?
  • Paper or plastic. Should plastic bags be outlawed?
  • Writing Prompts for Elementary School Students
  • January Writing Prompts
  • Writing Prompt (Composition)
  • How to Write a Persuasive Essay
  • 24 Journal Prompts for Creative Writing in the Elementary Classroom
  • Fun March Writing Prompts for Journaling
  • October Writing Prompts
  • May Writing Prompts
  • September Writing Prompts
  • Creative Writing Prompts for High School Students
  • December Writing Prompts
  • February Writing Prompts
  • Writing Prompts for 5th Grade
  • Christmas Journal Writing Prompts
  • Should You Write Your Own Recommendation Letter for Graduate School?
  • Martin Luther King Jr. Writing Prompts

Teacher Worksheets

  • Join for FREE
  • Printable Worksheets
  • Online Lessons
  • Test Maker™
  • Printable Games
  • Worksheet Generator
  • Plans & Pricing

Printable & online resources for educators

  • Test Maker TM
  • Browse All Questions
  • Questions With Images
  • Advanced Search

ELA Worksheets

Share/Like This Page

Filter by grade.

You are browsing Grade 8 questions. View questions in All Grades .

Kindergarten Grade 1 Grade 2 Grade 3 Grade 4 Grade 5 Grade 6 Grade 7 Grade 8 Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12

Browse Questions

  • All Subjects w/ Images (7034)
  • By ELA/Literacy Standard
  • By Math Standard
  • All Subjects (19223)

Reading Strategies

Conducting research, opinion writing, writing essays, writing fiction.

  • English as a Second Language ESL (3319)
  • Health and Medicine (408)
  • Life Skills (126)
  • Math (1936)
  • Physical Education (403)
  • Science (6483)
  • Social Studies (3899)
  • Study Skills and Strategies (19)
  • Technology (124)

Eighth Grade (Grade 8) Opinion Writing Questions

You can create printable tests and worksheets from these Grade 8 Opinion Writing questions! Select one or more questions using the checkboxes above each question. Then click the add selected questions to a test button before moving to another page.

  • counterclaim
  • Get a readers attention
  • Emphasize a point
  • Polish the writing
  • All of the above
  • It helps move your speech and ideas forward.
  • It keeps people from staring at you for long.
  • It increases the number of breaths you take.
  • It reduces stress and anxiety while speaking.
  • It helps you relax and lose your nerves.
  • It forces you to slow down and enunciate.
  • It makes it easier to come up with words that sound good.
  • It loosens your tongue so your mouth stays dry while you talk.
  • smile a lot
  • stand as still as a statue
  • change the inflection of your voice
  • write your speech using tongue twisters
  • It helps to be prepared.
  • Everyone is looking at you.
  • Even politicians get scared.
  • Speaking slowly reduces stuttering.
  • understatement
  • emotional appeal
  • appeal to authority
  • parallel structure
  • sentence structure
  • recognition
  • Appeal to Reason
  • Understatement
  • Emotional Appeal
  • Cause and Effect
  • Appeal to Authority
  • Privacy Policy
  • Terms of Use
  • FREE Printable Worksheets
  • Common Core ELA Worksheets
  • Common Core Math Worksheets

8th grade writing

by: Hank Pellissier | Updated: February 12, 2024

Print article

8th grader's writing under common core

Verbal has a double meaning for eighth grade writing: it refers to the oral presentations the kids will do and to this year’s focus on grammar — gerunds, participles, and infinitives.

Argument essays

Written in formal language, argument essays should start with an introduction that clearly presents the writer’s position and flows into a well-organized, research-backed argument that advocates for their position and argues against opposing claims. Your child’s writing should exhibit a profound understanding of the topic. Arguments should be logical and fueled by evidence from credible sources. Papers should end with a persuasive conclusion that summarizes the viewpoint and declares the topic resolved. Topics will vary, but you’ll often see teen issues such as: Are video games harmful to mental health? Should our school have uniforms? Should bullies be suspended or given a chance to make amends?

Informative and explanatory writing

In their informative and explanatory papers , students use formal language to explain complex topics with relevant data, precise ideas, and logical analyses. Kids should start with an intriguing introduction that previews the subject matter. Next, they present well-organized information that’s backed by evidence from credible sources. Eighth graders should use a variety of “strategy tools,” including:

  • Classifying information.
  • Defining terms.
  • Using subject-specific, academic , and transition vocabulary words.
  • Quoting sources.
  • Incorporating factual details.
  • Making comparisons.
  • Contrasting different situations.
  • Explaining cause-and-effect relationships.
  • Including graphics (charts, tables, images) and multimedia.
  • Using formatting (headings, bullet points).

Finally, the concluding paragraph should provide a synopsis of the main point of the essay. Your child’s papers are likely to cover topics that students are familiar with — but still need to research in order to answer, like If there is a drought, how can we save water? Or Explain how a specific invention has changed your life .

Narrative writing

Eighth graders write narratives or stories that describe events in their lives (personal histories, memoirs) or imagined scenarios (fiction, fantasy). Junior J.K. Rowlings learn effective storytelling techniques, such as introducing the narrator and characters, establishing context for the setting, and conveying a point of view. Students practice letting the sequence of events unfold, giving characters depth, and developing the plot through actions, dialogue, and reflection. Your future F. Scott Fitzgerald should use transition words to guide readers from one place and time to another. For example: Four hours later, Jack opened his locker to discover a shocking surprise . Or, Returning to the cafeteria, Tinsley saw the cute new boy sitting with her best friend, Amanda . Remember that even narratives have a conclusion, hopefully one that helps readers ponder the meaning of the story.

Changes and more changes

Grit. Concentration. Determination. Eighth graders strengthen their literary skills by revising their papers over and over again, following advice from teachers and classmates to re-imagine, re-outline, redraft, re-edit, rewrite, and try new approaches. Is this just a form of perfectionistic punishment? No, the practice helps teens learn to tighten their prose, pick stronger verbs, use more accurate descriptors, and organize their writing in the most effective and interesting ways.

Internet interaction

Your eighth grader will likely need the internet to create, type, and share their work, which will often have links to web sources and include graphics and multimedia. Also, these are typically typed. Your child should be tying about 40 words per minute. (Wisconsin’s Department of Public Instruction recommends a typing speed 5 times your grade . If your child needs practice, there are free typing classes for middle schoolers available online .)

It’s increasingly common for kids to be required to collaborate on projects online, often in Google Docs or Slides. What’s more, drafts and completed assignments are often turned in via email or by uploading to an online portal. So if your child’s technical skills aren’t up to snuff, think about getting your child a little extra help so these requirements don’t hold him back.

Evaluating their sources

Eighth graders do short projects that require research from multiple sources. Teens learn to evaluate the credibility of their sources. For example, Is Saturday Night Live as reliable as National Public Radio? No. Kids need to be careful about how they present information, paraphrasing information or using quotes to avoid plagiarizing, which Merriam-Webster defines as “to use the words or ideas of another person as if they were your own words or ideas.” The standard way to end all research projects? A bibliography, formatted correctly, of course, that shows both the quality and quantity of their sources.

Student critiques

Students get to do the critiquing this year — whether it’s a book or their classmate’s essay. Eighth graders analyze how modern fiction uses the plot, themes, and characters. Students look for connections and explain how a contemporary text borrows from, comments on, or changes the old foundation. For example, How does The Hunger Games trilogy use the Greek myth of Theseus and the Minotaur?

Students also evaluate the evidence their peers use in essays and to back up arguments. It helps them become more skilled at determining fact from fiction, legitimate truth from biased propaganda, scientific theories from fraudulent nonsense.

Eighth graders learn to identify verb voice. If the subject in a sentence does the action, then the verb is in the active voice, like this: The whale ate the shrimp. However, if the subject in a sentence is the target of the action, then the verb is in the passive voice, like this: The shrimp was eaten by the whale .

Presenting their work

Expect quite a few oral reports in eighth grade. In these presentations, kids need to deliver their arguments and the results of their investigations to the class. Key skills for a solid presentation include:

  • using formal language;
  • making eye contact;
  • pronouncing things clearly and loudly enough for all to hear.

Your child’s presentations should be coherent, organized, logical, supported by evidence, and, in many cases, jazzed up with costumes, props, maps, music, sound effects, charts, and visual projection. Teens (and adults) often suffer from sweaty, knee-knocking stage fright. Inform your adolescent that this is totally normal; remind them to breathe and enjoy the attention.

Here’s a preview of the presentation skills required in high school.

YouTube video

opinion writing 8th grade

6 ways to improve a college essay

Writing-tips-for-every-grade

Quick writing tips for every age

Writing on the wall

Writing on the wall

Why parents must teach writing

GreatSchools Logo

Yes! Sign me up for updates relevant to my child's grade.

Please enter a valid email address

Thank you for signing up!

Server Issue: Please try again later. Sorry for the inconvenience

  • Skip to main content
  • Writing Masterclass
  • Math Masterclass
  • Course Login
  • YouTube Channel
  • Facebook Group
  • Search this website

Not So Wimpy Teacher

The Not So WImpy Teacher creates resources for busy teachers in grades 2-5 who are looking to deliver engaging and meaningful lessons without overwhelm and chaos.

Home

Get my FREE Editing & Revising Centers

Get my free editing & revising centers.

Editing and Revising Centers

Help your students master tricky writing skills with these FREE Editing and Revising Centers. Students in grades 2-5 will love this fun, collaborative way to practice editing and revising. Perfect for test prep and review.

We won't send you spam. Unsubscribe at any time.

opinion writing 8th grade

Last updated on July 29, 2023 by Not So Wimpy Teacher

Teaching Opinion Writing: 8 Must-Do Tips

Teaching opinion writing cover image

I love teaching opinion writing. And students love it too. Opinion writing is the third writing genre I teach. I recommend teaching writing in units, starting with personal narrative, informational report, opinion writing, and finally, fiction. 

This approach allows you to spend eight full weeks practicing one specific type of writing so students can truly master the skills. Today I am sharing 8 Must-Do Tips for teaching opinion writing. For more information about what to teach in each genre, check out my handy writing guide: What to Teach in Writing .

Check out this video about teaching opinion writing:

Keep reading to see our best tips for teaching opinion writing.

1. Start with a pre-assessment

The first must-do tip for teaching opinion writing is to start with a pre-assessment.  The pre-assessment allows you to see how much students know so you can tailor your lessons appropriately and it allows you to measure student growth at the end of the unit.

 Give students a simple writing prompt and one writing period to respond to it the best they can. Try not to answer too many questions during this writing time. You want to see what students know.

Use a simple rubric to score the sample (but don’t add the grade to the grade book). Then you can use the sample to plan your lessons, formulate conference groups, and use as a baseline. It’s not realistic to expect all your students to master all the opinion writing skills after eight weeks. But when you compare their pre-assessments to their final masterpiece, you will be able to see how much they have grown as writers.

2. Provide examples

At the beginning of your opinion writing unit, you need to spend a day or two teaching WHAT opinion writing is. You can’t expect students to write strong opinions if they don’t know what opinion writing looks like.

A task card scoot is a great way to reinforce new opinion writing skills

Use lots of mentor text passages (I include them in my writing units) and books. Once you’ve gone over several examples of what opinion writing is, a task card scoot is a great way to check for understanding.

3. Give choice

Allow students to choose their own writing topic. This is the best way to increase their excitement and ownership. No-one wants to be told what to write about. Imagine if someone told you that you had to write an opinion piece on why NASCAR is the best sport and you didn’t know anything about NASCAR. That wouldn’t be a very fun assignment. 

Students feel the same way. They are much more invested in a writing project when they can choose what to write about.

But that doesn’t mean choosing a topic will come naturally. Plan to spend 2-3 days of your opinion writing unit teaching strategies for generating topics. Two of my favorite strategies are challenging students to come up with lists of their favorites (things like hobbies, goods, movies, etc.) and things that they want (a kitten, to go camping, to eat ice cream every day). 

They can pick a favorite item from one of those lists and turn it into the topic for their opinion essay. They will use their essay to try to convince you that they are right. (Toy Story is the best movie, Why I Should be allowed to eat ice cream every day).

Student drafting an opinion essay

4. Draft early

This might be the most important tip for teaching opinion writing or any type of writing. Let students draft early in the process. 

If you try to teach every skill prior to letting students write, they will get bored. Plus, it is impossible to teach them everything they need to know before they start writing.

Instead, let them draft right away. Then each day you can teach a mini lesson on important skills. After you have taught the mini lesson,  have students go back to the draft and revise using the new strategies you have just taught.

The key is to keep this process simple. Break mini lessons down into bite-size pieces. Have students practice just one or two strategies a day. And don’t expect perfection.

5. Plan bite-sized lessons

Student printables from opinion writing unit

When teaching opinion writing, you will need to teach students to use both reasons and examples to support their opinions. But it is super important to separate these into different lessons. 

You will want to teach a lesson or two on using reasons to support opinions. And then another lesson on using examples. When taught together, most students don’t understand the difference between reasons and examples. 

Plan to spend more time focused on reasons because they are essential to good opinion writing. Some kids may never understand examples in your grade level, but they can still have a quality piece of writing if they include reasons.

6. Look for the opposing opinion

Opinion writing notebook

Another important strategy when teaching opinion writing is to help students identify the opposing opinion. When they anticipate objections, they can strengthen their own reasons. 

A great way to do this is by asking questions. 

  • Who won’t agree with you? 
  • What will they say? 
  • How can you change that opinion?

When students anticipate opposing arguments, they become better at supporting their own opinion.

7. Make time to edit

I believe that writing is process. First, students draft. Then, they revise. And finally, they edit. When teaching opinion writing, let students spend a day editing their essay. Give them resources like word lists, anchor carts, or editing checklists to help. Also, don’t overwhelm them by having them try to correct every mistake. Instead, have them search for specific errors, like commonly misspelled words or missing punctuation, one at a time.

Then, spend  another day having a peer edit their writing. Fresh eyes can often pick up a lot more errors. And the peer can also flag if something doesn’t make sense.

Here’s a bonus tip: reading their own essay out loud helps students to discover more of their errors. 

After students have done their editing, resist the urge to correct all of the remaining errors. They are kids and their writing is not supposed to be perfect! Seeing a page marked up with pen is discouraging to everyone.

FREE Editing and Revising Centers

Want to make editing even easier? Check out my FREE Editing and Revising Centers !

Editing and Revising Centers

This FREE resource includes centers to help your students master tricky editing and revising skills.

Inside you’ll find:

  • 18 hands-on centers, each focused on one specific skill
  • Differentiated activities for grades 2-5
  • Narrative, opinion, and informational writing tips, examples, and practice activities
  • Editing and revising checklists
  • Detailed teacher directions and center signs

These centers make a great review activity! Divide your class into groups and let them work together to read the tips, review the examples, practice the skill, and discuss their ideas.

I know you and your students are going to love them!

8. Celebrate student writing

Finally, when you are wrapping up your unit on opinion writing, set aside some time to celebrate.

Find a fun way to publish. Maybe create a class book, “In our humble opinions . . .” or try posting opinion pieces on a class blog. Create an Opinion Page bulletin board and hang up student work.

Try a writing celebration. Have a publishing party and allow students to share with one another. Put them in small groups and let everyone read their writing. Or ask students to share their favorite paragraph. Or try an Opinion Opening Night.

When you make it fun, students look forward to completing their next writing piece.

Opinion Writing Units

Opinion essay units have everything you need to teach opinion writing

My opinion writing units have EVERYTHING you need to make teaching opinion writing easy. 

These units are available for grades 2-5 and come with 8 weeks of opinion writing lessons. They include:

  • Lesson plans
  • Mini lessons
  • Anchor charts
  • Mentor texts ( you don’t have to purchase any additional books or spend hours hunting in the library!
  • Writing tasks
  • Conference forms
  • Rubrics and more

The lesson plans are simple. All you have to do is print and teach .

Students will learn all of the skills necessary for writing persuasive essays with a strong opinion: how to use facts and reasons, how to write topic and concluding sentences, how to structure paragraphs…and so much more!

Finally, these units make writing fun for your students. You may even find that your students beg for more writing time. And when students enjoy writing and get lots of practice, they perform better on standardized tests. 

But you don’t have to take my word for it. Look what Kimberly M. had to say:

This is THE BEST way to teach opinion writing! I love that the mentor texts are provided and that they are fun, interesting, and relatable to my students. It is so fun to read the mentor text to my students and ask them what they think the authors’ opinion is, what their thesis statement is, what their reasons and examples are, etc. I love that this unit focuses on each portion of the essay a little bit at a time. I love to teach reasons and examples with color codes, that way students know that their reasons support their opinion and the examples support their reasons! There are so many wonderful tools for teaching and learning in this resource, especially the anchor charts! I like to use them as a guide to create larger anchor charts with my students, but they cover all of the information that I need in the unit! – Kimberly M.

Shop This Post

2nd Grade opinion writing

Second Grade Opinion Writing Unit

3rd Grade opinion

Third Grade Opinion Writing Unit

4th grade opinion writing

Fourth Grade Opinion Writing Unit

5th grade opinion

Fifth Grade Opinion Writing Unit

More tips for teaching writing.

Want even more tips on how to teach writing? Then you will love my online professional development course, the Not So Wimpy Writing Masterclass . I specifically developed this online professional development course for teachers in grades 2-5 to help simplify writing workshop and provide the tools and strategies you need to be a more confident writing teacher.

You’ll learn tried and true strategies for how to teach writing , including how to:

  • Teach writing in units
  • Create manageable mini lessons  
  • Keep students on task during independent writing time
  • Implement a successful writing workshop without chaos and confusion
  • Transform ALL your students into eager and excited writers who have the skills needed to perform well on standardized tests

In short, this course is designed to help you become a more confident writing teacher , regardless of what writing curriculum you have (or don’t have).

Masterclass on iphone

And the Masterclass is so easy to take. It’s entirely online ! You can watch whenever and wherever works best for you. And you get lifetime access to the course, which means you can return to the videos over and over again.

Check out the amazing bonuses!

Not only do you get 38 training videos , a 10-hour professional development certificate , a course workbook, and tons of tried and true strategies that have been used successfully in thousands of classrooms, but you also get these incredible bonuses:

  • Compare and Contrast Reading Response Essay Writing Unit – Give your students extra practice with this tricky skill with my easy-to-use lessons.
  • Bonus Module: Video Trainings of 3 Genres – See the must-know tips and tricks for teaching the most important skills in personal narrative, informational report, and opinion essay writing.

Ongoing Support – You’ll get immediate access to the exclusive Not So Wimpy Writing Gurus Facebook group where you can ask questions, get ideas and inspiration and interact with the Not So Wimpy team and Masterclass alums (aka other teachers).

​​ Registration for the Not So Wimpy Writing Masterclass is currently closed. Be sure to sign up for the Waitlist so you will be the first to know when we open it again. Sign up now so you don’t miss out!

Teaching Opinion Writing Pin

I hope you enjoy these tips for teaching opinion writing. You can also find tips for teaching personal narrative and informational report writing .

Have a Not So Wimpy Day,

Jamie signature

You may also enjoy these posts

Writing units in binders cover image of 5 super easy ways to make writing fun

Reader Interactions

Leave a comment cancel reply.

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

More than 400 helpful resources available in my shop!

opinion writing 8th grade

Not So Wimpy Writing Masterclass

Do you struggle to find time to teach writing? Do you find it a challenge to deliver lessons that help all of your writers? Would you like to learn a simple and effective way to teach writing? The Not So Wimpy Writing Masterclass is an online professional development course for grades 2-5. In this course, you will go from feeling overwhelmed to feeling confident and excited about teaching writing.

opinion writing 8th grade

Check out these recent podcast episodes:

  • Connecting with Students Online with Jennifer Serravallo
  • A Simple Problem-Solving Strategy That Works Every Time
  • Giving Students Feedback About Their Writing
  • Virtual and Socially Distant Valentine’s Day Activities for the Classroom
  • How to Use Project-Based Learning in the Classroom

Grab a snack and join the discussion over on Facebook!

We have four separate groups for grades 2-5

Get even more great tips and tricks on my YouTube channel!

opinion writing 8th grade

We LOVE and recommend these products!

Check out the books, supplies, and other products that we use in our own classrooms. We only recommend those things that we absolutely love and swear by!

opinion writing 8th grade

Hello! I’m Jamie

  • I believe that students need to be the leaders of the classroom. Even third graders are old enough to be held accountable and to take responsibility for their learning.
  • I do not believe that kids were made to sit in seats. They need to get up and move around.
  • Differentiated instruction is a must. I use guided reading and guided math groups to meet the individual needs of my students.
  • Helping a student to discover their love for reading is a privilege that I never get tired of.
  • School should be fun! We party in my class!

Follow Me Here

opinion writing 8th grade

  • Grades 6-12
  • School Leaders

Black History Month for Kids: Google Slides, Resources, and More!

33 Mentor Texts for Opinion Writing

Show kids how powerful sharing ideas in writing can be.

Mentor Texts feature image

In today’s world, we want our teaching to inspire students to be forward thinkers and changemakers. Teaching them how to share their opinions in writing is a key ingredient. Let’s get kids making signs and writing letters, lists, reviews, essays, blog posts, and speeches! Check out some of our favorite opinion-writing mentor texts to bring this important genre to life for kids. We’ve got plenty of picture books for the younger set, and titles to help older kids make the leap to persuasive writing backed by researched facts.

(Just a heads up, WeAreTeachers may collect a share of sales from the links on this page. We only recommend items our team loves!)

1. We Disagree by Bethanie Deeney Murguia

Book cover for We Disagree as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

A mouse and a squirrel think differently about, well, everything. Can they ever be friends? This is such a cute title for introducing kids to what it means to share an opinion, and it could lead to plenty of writing prompts to open an opinion-writing unit.

Buy it: We Disagree on Amazon

2. I Love Insects by Lizzy Rockwell

Book cover for I Love Insects as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

This early reader should definitely be in your primary classroom collection of opinion-writing mentor texts to help introduce the genre. Do you love insects? Two kids give competing reasons for why and why not. Read it aloud and head straight into shared writing of a list of pros and cons.

Buy it: I Love Insects on Amazon

3. Usha and the Big Digger by Amitha Jagannath Knight

Book cover for Usha and the Big Digger as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

To introduce kids to opinion writing, you need opinion-writing mentor texts to teach them what “opinions” are—and Usha, Aarti, and Gloria have them in this book! They each see something different when they look at the stars. This book could lead to a great introduction activity in which students try to convince each other that they see the Big Dipper, a “Big Digger,” a “Big Kite …” or something else. (Hint: It’s all in your perspective!)

Buy it: Usha and the Big Digger on Amazon

 4. Don’t Feed the Bear by Kathleen Doherty

Book cover for Don't Feed the Bear as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

When a park ranger puts up a “Don’t Feed the Bear” reminder, he has no idea about the persuasive sign-writing battle he’ll set in motion. (Strategic language includes “Please feed the ranger rotten eggs and slimy spinach.”) Share this hilarious title to introduce students to using signs to influence others’ thinking.

Buy it: Don’t Feed the Bear on Amazon

5. Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! by Mo Willems

Book cover for Don't Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

Let a favorite character guide young students in the art of persuasion. The bus driver does not want Pigeon in the driver’s seat, but the well-known bird builds an emotional and unrelenting case.

Buy it: Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! on Amazon

6. Our Favorite Day of the Year by A.E. Ali

Book cover for Our Favorite Day of the Year

We adore sharing this book with young students to open inclusive conversations about favorite holidays and traditions. Each student in Musa’s class shares about their favorite day of the year, from Eid Al-Fitr to Pi Day. Use this book to prompt kids to write their own opinion pieces about their favorite days, and to model how reasoning, information, and anecdotes can support one’s opinion.

Buy it: Our Favorite Day of the Year on Amazon

7. Kamala and Maya’s Big Idea by Meena Harris

Book cover for Kamala and Maya's Big Idea

This true story from Kamala Harris’ childhood details how she and her sister wrote letters to their landlord until he agreed to let them build a playground in their apartment complex courtyard. Get kids excited about how their opinion writing could create real change!

Buy it: Kamala and Maya’s Big Idea on Amazon

8. If I Were President by Trygve Skaug

Book cover for If I Were President

A young boy talks at length about what he’d do differently if he ran the country. Maybe cars could run on legs instead of gasoline, and “playing” should be a subject taught in school. Share this with kids who need more ideas for opinion-writing topics!

Buy it: If I Were President on Amazon

9. The Little Book of Little Activists by Penguin Young Readers

Book cover for The Little Book of Little Activists as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

Introduce young students to the idea of activism and its connection to opinion writing. This inspiring photo essay includes examples of kids’ opinions about real-life causes and many written signs.

Buy it: The Little Book of Activists on Amazon

10. The Big Bed by Bunmi Laditan

Book cover for The Big Bed as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

This protagonist is a toddler on a mission—a mission to kick her dad out of her parents’ bed so she can sleep with her mom. Use this little girl’s precocious modeling to show students how to polish their own opinion writing by adding visual supports.

Buy it: The Big Bed on Amazon

11. The Perfect Pet by Margie Palatini

Book cover for The Perfect Pet as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

Elizabeth crafts a plan to convince her parents to let her have a pet, with unexpected—but pleasing—results. This is our favorite opinion-writing mentor text for introducing kids to win-win solutions and encouraging them to suggest them in their own opinion writing.

Buy it: The Perfect Pet on Amazon

12. & 13. Can I Be Your Dog? and I Found a Kitty! by Troy Cummings

Book cover for Can I Be Your Dog? as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

First, read a collection of persuasive letters from a lonely dog seeking an owner that’s a twist on kids’ pet requests. Each letter is tailored to a specific audience, with Arfy promising to lick things clean, protect, and deliver endless affection.

In the sequel, Arfy uses his persuasive skills to help someone else, a lovable stray kitten. Notice with students how he once again shapes his reasoning for each recipient—and how he doesn’t give up until he’s successful!

Buy it: Can I Be Your Dog? on Amazon

Buy it: I Found a Kitty! on Amazon

14. True You: A Gender Journey by Gwen Agna and Shelley Rotner

Book cover for True You: A Gender Journey

This delightful and important title stars real kids with a full range of gender identities. Each child introduces themselves in a speech bubble that shares their opinion about gender identity. Use this title to model talking to the reader using strong, direct language.

Buy it: True You: A Gender Journey on Amazon

15. Stella Writes an Opinion by Janiel Wagstaff

Book cover for Stella Writes an Opinion as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

Sometimes you want perfectly straightforward opinion-writing mentor texts that match right up with your teaching goals. Stella thinks second graders should be able to have a morning snack time. She sets out to write about her opinion, state her reasons, and ends with a compelling summation.

Buy it: Stella Writes an Opinion on Amazon

16. I Wanna New Room by Karen Kaufman Orloff

Book cover for I Wanna New Room as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

After his successful angling for a pet in I Wanna Iguana , Alex tries using note-writing to broach his next request: a room of his own, away from his pesky younger brother. The parent-child communication includes plenty of examples of making and responding to counterarguments.

Buy it: I Wanna New Room on Amazon

17. Be Glad Your Dad … Is Not an Octopus! by Matthew Logelin and Sara Jensen

Book cover for Be Glad Your Dad is Not an Octopus! as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

This author’s opinion is that you should appreciate your dad for who he is. He makes his case with plenty of arguments grounded in facts—facts that show that if your dad were an animal, he could be even more gross, embarrassing, or annoying!

Buy it: Be Glad Your Dad … Is Not an Octopus! on Amazon

18. Earrings! by Judith Viorst

Book cover for Earrings! as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

A young girl desperately wants her ears pierced, but her parents respond to her begging with a firm no. Ask students to evaluate the merits of her various arguments. Which are strong? Which are just whiny?

Buy it: Earrings! on Amazon

19. Pick a Picture, Write an Opinion! by Kristen McCurry

Book cover for Pick a Picture, Write an Opinion! as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

If you’re looking for opinion-writing mentor texts that lay it all out there explicitly, you’ll appreciate this resource. Engaging, diverse photos and topics, a kid-friendly tone, and explicit advice make this a helpful primer to accompany more conventional mentor texts.

Buy it: Pick a Picture, Write an Opinion! on Amazon

20. I Hate My Cats (A Love Story) by Davide Cali

Book cover for I Hate My Cats (A Love Story) as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

This narrator has plenty of reasons to dislike his self-centered cats, which he outlines in specific detail. Use this title as an example of a multi-pronged argument. (Plus, show that sometimes, opinion writing actually leads us to change our own minds. By the end, the owner realizes he actually loves his pets, quirks and all.)

Buy it: I Hate My Cats (A Love Story) on Amazon

21. I Can Be Anything! Don’t Tell Me I Can’t by Diane Dillon

Book cover for I Can Be Anything! Don't Tell Me I Can't as an example of mentor texts for opinion writing

Zoe makes big plans for her future, from being an archaeologist to a veterinarian. She quiets self-doubt with confident arguments. Aside from sharing this title’s lovely, affirming message, use it to teach kids to anticipate tough questions and head them off convincingly in their opinion writing.

Buy it: I Can Be Anything! Don’t Tell Me I Can’t on Amazon

22. Rise Up and Write It by Nandini Ahuja

Book cover for Rise Up and Write It

Farah Patel works to convince her local government to improve a vacant lot to benefit her community. Great realistic examples of using letters and signs to inspire change!

Buy it: Rise Up and Write It on Amazon

23. The Day the Crayons Quit by Drew Daywalt

Book cover for The Day the Crayons Quit as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

These disgruntled but endearing crayons have opinions, and they aren’t shy about making them known in this read-aloud favorite. Check out this free downloadable educator guide from the publisher for persuasive letter-writing curriculum connections.

Buy it: The Day the Crayons Quit on Amazon

24. Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean’s Most Fearless Scientist by Jess Keating

Book cover for Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean's Most Fearless Scientist as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

The best opinion writing springs from genuine conviction. Eugenie Clark believed sharks were fascinating and  that women could be accomplished scientists who study them. Use this title to help students generate their own passion-fueled topics about which to write.

Buy it: Shark Lady on Amazon

25. What Can a Citizen Do? by Dave Eggers

Book cover for What Can a Citizen Do?

Share this title for its inspiring message about the power of one citizen to evoke positive change through spoken words, writing, and action. Also consider it as an example of how words and art interact in opinion writing; the illustrations and text work together here to advance the book’s message.

Buy it: What Can a Citizen Do? on Amazon?

26. Dr. Coo and the Pigeon Protest by Sarah Hampson

Book cover for Dr. Coo and the Pigeon Protest

Dr. Archibald Coo believes that pigeons don’t deserve their reputation as avian pests. He outlines a plan to change the minds of his city neighbors. Part of his approach is to send a persuasive letter to the mayor, suggesting creative, mutually beneficial agreements—a great example for student writers aiming to change the minds of authority figures.

Buy it: Dr. Coo and the Pigeon Protest on Amazon

27. The Great Kapok Tree by Lynne Cherry

Book cover for The Great Kapok Tree

The animals in this classic read-aloud give a range of reasons their home shouldn’t be chopped down. Use them as examples of how to vary sentence structures and formats when listing arguments and how to use specific details to strengthen reasoning.

Buy it: The Great Kapok Tree on Amazon

28. Let the Children March by Monica Clark-Robinson

Book cover for Let the Children March

This fictional account of the Birmingham Children’s Crusade, told from the point of view of a young participant, is a classroom must-read. It exemplifies how children’s actions can make a difference in an adult world and how powerful language strengthens a written message.

Buy it: Let the Children March on Amazon

29. No Voice Too Small: Fourteen Young Americans Making History edited by Lindsay H. Metcalf, Keila V. Dawson, and Jeanette Bradley

Book cover for No Voice Too Small: Fourteen Young Americans Making History

This powerful title introduces inspiring and diverse young activists’ causes using original poems by notable authors. Show kids that impactful opinion writing can take many forms.

Buy it: No Voice Too Small on Amazon

30. The Week Junior magazine “Big Debate” feature

Covers for The Week Junior magazine

The Week Junior is one of our absolute favorite magazines for the classroom , and its “Big Debate” section is a main reason for that. Each issue examines both sides of an interesting topic, from whether we should eat Maine lobster, to if space exploration is worth the huge cost, to whether or not kids’ screen time should be restricted. Have kids study examples to get tips for their own opinion writing, and maybe even create their own “Big Debate.”

Buy it: The Week Junior

31. Planet Ocean: Why We All Need a Healthy Ocean by Patricia Newman

Book cover for Planet Ocean: Why We All Need a Healthy Ocean as an example of opinion writing mentor texts

This is a fantastic resource for upper elementary and middle school classrooms moving from opinion writing to research-based persuasive writing. This mind-boggling look at the impact of trash on our oceans gives kids so many models for sharing one’s opinions, experiences, and knowledge to spark change. Embedded QR codes take readers straight to awesome examples of persuasive speeches and other cool resources that support the author’s message.

Buy it: Planet Ocean: Why We All Need a Healthy Ocean on Amazon

32. We Are Still Here! Native American Truths Everyone Should Know by Traci Sorell

Book cover for We Are Still Here!: Native American Truths Everyone Should Know

A classroom prepares to celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day with research projects that convey a clear message: Native Nations are still here! Besides being critical content for kids, this is a great example of how to use researched facts to support one’s opinion.

Buy it: We Are Still Here! on Amazon

33. Marley Dias Gets It Done and So Can You! by Marley Dias

Book cover for Marley Dias Gets It Done and So Can You!

Every middle school student should meet Marley Dias through this powerful account of her #1000blackgirlbooks campaign. It boasts plenty of practical advice for young activists. Pull text excerpts for mini-lessons about tailoring opinion writing to your audience. Marley writes straight to her peers.

Buy it: Marley Dias Gets It Done and So Can You! on Amazon

Excited to share these opinion-writing mentor texts? Also check out our favorite mentor texts for procedural and narrative writing.

Want more book lists and classroom ideas be sure to  subscribe to our newsletters, you might also like.

Examples of mentor texts including My Papi has a Motorcycle and Soul Food Sunday

32 Best Mentor Texts for Narrative Writing in Elementary School

Help students learn from the best. Continue Reading

Copyright © 2023. All rights reserved. 5335 Gate Parkway, Jacksonville, FL 32256

opinion writing grade 8

All Formats

Resource types, all resource types.

  • Rating Count
  • Price (Ascending)
  • Price (Descending)
  • Most Recent

Opinion writing grade 8

Preview of Unpopular Opinions - Opinion Writing Activity (Grade 6-8 Language)

Unpopular Opinions - Opinion Writing Activity ( Grade 6- 8 Language)

opinion writing 8th grade

  • Google Drive™ folder

Preview of Grade 8 Persuasive Writing Unit (Printable + Google Slides™)

Grade 8 Persuasive Writing Unit (Printable + Google Slides™)

  • Google Apps™
  • Easel Activity

Preview of Book Vs. Movie: Writing a Compare and Contrast Opinion Essay

Book Vs. Movie: Writing a Compare and Contrast Opinion Essay

opinion writing 8th grade

NO PREP PACK - Grades 4- 8 - Persuasive writing prompts, rubrics (Ontario)

opinion writing 8th grade

Opinion Writing Essay Graphic Organizers with Activities for Grades 8

opinion writing 8th grade

NO PREP PACK - Grades 4- 8 - Persuasive writing - Ink Saver - (Ontario)

Preview of Benchmark Advance 1st Grade 2022 Unit 8 Opinion Process Writing Student Journal

Benchmark Advance 1st Grade 2022 Unit 8 Opinion Process Writing Student Journal

opinion writing 8th grade

INTRO TO PERSUASIVE WRITING HANDOUT, GRADE 6 7 8 , ONTARIO CURRICULUM

opinion writing 8th grade

  • Word Document File

Preview of 4th Grade Into Reading HMH Writing Workshop Unit 8 Opinion Essay Bundle

4th Grade Into Reading HMH Writing Workshop Unit 8 Opinion Essay Bundle

opinion writing 8th grade

Persuasive Writing Unit Grades 8 to 10 GOOGLE SLIDES Drive Angie Barillaro

opinion writing 8th grade

  • Google Slides™

Preview of PERSUASIVE/OPINION WRITING Rubric and Template for grades 5-8

PERSUASIVE/ OPINION WRITING Rubric and Template for grades 5- 8

opinion writing 8th grade

Learning Persuasive Writing & Argument (US English Edition) Grades 4- 8

opinion writing 8th grade

Opinion Writing Prompt Pack Grades 6- 8

opinion writing 8th grade

Engage in Persuasive Writing with Role Play Activities | ELA for Grades 8 -12

opinion writing 8th grade

  • Easel Assessment

Preview of Grades 6-8 Free Opinion Writing Prompts with Articles: Living in Tiny Houses

Grades 6- 8 Free Opinion Writing Prompts with Articles: Living in Tiny Houses

opinion writing 8th grade

Superheroes and Persuasive Writing - Grades 5- 8

opinion writing 8th grade

Opinion Writing - Surf Haven Benchmark Advance Grade 2 Unit 8 Week 3

opinion writing 8th grade

Persuasive Writing Checklist for Grades 8 -12

opinion writing 8th grade

Opinion Writing Teachers College Grade 5 Lesson 8 : Using Commas

opinion writing 8th grade

FREE 20 Opinion Writing Prompts for 3- 8 Grades : Educational Writing Worksheets

opinion writing 8th grade

Free sample of Superheroes and Persuasive Writing unit - Grades 5- 8

Preview of Paragraph Writing How to Write a Paragraph of the Week Grades 6-8 with Digital

Paragraph Writing How to Write a Paragraph of the Week Grades 6- 8 with Digital

opinion writing 8th grade

Interactive Writing Notebook Pages for Grade 1 and Grade 2

opinion writing 8th grade

RACES Paragraph Writing Strategy Introduction Lesson GRADES 6- 8 Google Apps

opinion writing 8th grade

  • Internet Activities
  • We're hiring
  • Help & FAQ
  • Privacy policy
  • Student privacy
  • Terms of service
  • Tell us what you think

Mrs. Winter's Bliss - Resources For Kindergarten, 1st & 2nd Grade

Time-saving + research-backed resources, professional development training, activities, and centers aligned with Science of Reading!

View My Account

How to Teach Opinion Writing

opinion writing 8th grade

In this post, I share 5 tips for How to Teach Opinion Writing and provide details about the Opinion Writing Units resources I have created for Kindergarten, 1st and 2nd grade students.   Be sure to download 3 FREE opinion writing graphic organizers !

The Common Core writing domain focuses on three big types of writing: informative, narrative, and opinion writing.  Each genre serves a unique purpose and follows a specific structure in which we must explicitly teach our students.   In my last post I shared tips and resources for teaching Informative Writing and today I’m excited to move on to Opinion Writing. 

opinion writing 8th grade

Opinion Writing is one of my favorite genres to teach.  Young students have opinions on just about EVERYTHING and they usually aren’t afraid to share them!!  For this reason, they find the genre highly engaging! 

Today I’m sharing 5 tips for teaching opinion writing, as well as a valuable resource that has everything you need to bring opinion writing into your kindergarten , first grade, or second grade literacy centers! 

Tips for Teaching Opinion Writing

1.  read opinion writing mentor texts .

Before you can ask your students to write in a genre that is new to them, you must first immerse them in it.  So to begin your unit, you’ll want to share examples of opinion writing with your students.  These mentor texts provide students with excellent examples of opinion writing. 

As you read them aloud, highlight the way the author structures their writing.  Identify the author’s topic or opinion and point out the reasons he or she gives to support their opinion.  All of these things will help students better understand what type of writing we are asking them to do.    

When you’re picking opinion mentor texts to share with your students there are a few things to consider .  First, do you (the educator) think it is excellent?  Second, is it easy for your students to understand?  And finally, is it relevant to the type of writing you are teaching?  If you answer “Yes!” to all three, then you’re good to go!

To help you out I’ve created a list of excellent mentor texts you can use when teaching opinion writing to kindergarten, first, or second grade students.  

opinion writing 8th grade

A List of Opinion Writing Mentor Texts:

  • Duck Rabbit by Amy Krouse Rosenthal
  • I Wanna Iguana by Karen Kaufmann Orloff
  • Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus by Mo Willems
  • Red is Best by Kathy Stinson
  • Can I Be Your Dog? by Troy Cummings
  • The Big Bed by Bunmi Laditan

I’ve saved all these titles on one board so you can easily take a closer look at these mentor texts.  Click here to see this list on Amazon.

2.  Model Your Own Opinion Writing

I know I say this a lot, but it’s worth repeating…. MODEL, MODEL, and then once again MODEL what you expect your students to do!  It is a tremendously powerful instructional tool! 

When teaching opinion writing you’ll first model how to choose a topic.  When you generate ideas you can ask yourself, “What do I know all about?” “What do I care about?” “What do I wish other people believed?”.

If these questions feel too broad for your students you can use simple “would you rather” questions to get your ideas for an opinion piece.  For example, “Would you rather have a dog or a cat?”  This could lead to the topic, “Dogs are the best pet.” Keep it simple and choose a topic that is relatable to your students.    

opinion writing 8th grade

Next, model how you plan your writing using a graphic organizer.  Show them how you open with a topic sentence that states your opinion. Next, come up with your supporting reasons. End with a closing sentence that restates your opinion.  

opinion writing 8th grade

Model how you use the graphic organizer to guide you as you write out your full piece. 

Finally, reread your work aloud and show students how you catch silly mistakes such as spelling, capitalization or punctuation errors.  You can also show how you add additional supporting reasons to make your writing more persuasive to the reader.  

3. Use Anchor Charts

You want your students to know that when they write an opinion piece they are sharing their own opinion. They are not sharing true facts. Take time to review the difference between facts and opinions. Create an anchor chart that defines fact vs. opinion.

opinion writing 8th grade

You’ll also want to review language that is specific to the genre. Remind students of the linking or transitional words that connect their opinion to their reasons.

opinion writing 8th grade

Finally, you’ll want to create an anchor chart using the writing you model. This will serve as another example of excellent opinion writing.  As a class, add labels to identify the topic sentence, supporting reasons and the closing sentence in your shared writing.  

opinion writing 8th grade

All of these anchor charts can be posted in your writing center. Encourage your students to refer back to them and use them as support as they write their own pieces.

4. Allow students to edit and share their writing

Provide a good writers checklist at your writing center.  For opinion writing you’ll want the checklist to include items such,  “Do I have a topic sentence that clearly states my opinion?”  “Do I have supporting reasons ?” and “Do I have a closing sentence?”, as well as reminders to check for spelling, capitalization, and punctuation errors.  

opinion writing 8th grade

You can also create a rubric specific to the genre. Model how you use it to assess your own work and how it can be used to provide feedback to others.   

opinion writing 8th grade

Give students the opportunity to share their writing with others!  Pair students with partners and let them read their pieces to each other.  Encourage them to provide feedback using the editing checklist and the rubric as a guide.  

opinion writing 8th grade

5. Provide Daily Opportunities for Students to Write

As with all things, writing takes PRACTICE!  Students need dedicated instructional time to learn the skills and strategies necessary to become effective writers, as well as time to practice what they learn.   When you think about your daily instructional schedule, make sure you are giving your students ample opportunities to practice their opinion writing through whole-group instruction, small groups and/or independent practice in writing centers. 

Opinion Writing Unit For Kindergarten, First, and Second Grade Students

Today I’m excited to share with you the details about my Kindergarten Opinion , 1st Grade Opinion , and my 2nd grade Opinion Writing units!  I love them because they have ALL the resources you need to give your students the practice they need to master opinion writing.  

These units were developed with standards-based research specific to each grade. You can use them within whole class or small group instruction, or as a literacy center activity where students can practice opinion writing independently!  

opinion writing 8th grade

What’s Included in these Opinion Writing Resources?

The kindergarten , first grade , and the second grade opinion writing resources each include information to help you unpack the unit and a mini-lesson you’ll teach to give your students a review of opinion writing.  You’ll get a list of suggested mentor texts and online resources, printable anchor charts, graphic organizers, seasonal writing prompts, and conversational task cards to help get kids to share their opinion on different topics.  

opinion writing 8th grade

Kindergarten Opinion Writing Unit

Kindergarteners will probably need a review of fact vs. opinion so the kindergarten resource includes a printable fact vs. opinion anchor chart . You’ll also get charts with opinion writing sentence starters to help them organize their reasons and thoughts.  

opinion writing 8th grade

The kindergarten seasonal writing prompts come with traceable sentence stems and picture supported vocabulary word bank to assist young writers in brainstorming ideas and spelling words while writing.

opinion writing 8th grade

Finally, you’ll get an editing checklist that is specific to opinion writing but also appropriate for the kindergarten level. 

opinion writing 8th grade

First Grade and Second Grade Opinion Writing Units

The first and second-grade resources include fact vs. opinion and linking words anchor charts that provide review and help them organize their ideas.  

opinion writing 8th grade

To help first and second-graders practice writing you’ll get 28 “Would You Rather” seasonal conversational opinion centers and 24 writing prompts. That’s more than enough to keep kids engaged in sharing their opinions all throughout the year!  

The prompts are both PRINTABLE & DIGITAL. The digital version has been PRELOADED for you, with 1 click add them to your Google Drive or upload them to SeeSaw.

opinion writing 8th grade

Each seasonal prompt printable paper includes a story-specific vocabulary bank to provide spelling assistance and help students get ideas for reasons to support their opinion. 

opinion writing 8th grade

Finally, you’ll also get a self-editing checklist and rubric that have both been made specifically for opinion writing.  This rubric can be used as a self-assessment tool or as a guide for peer feedback.     

I love these writing units because they can be used in so many different ways.  They offer opportunities for students to practice opinion writing as a whole class, in small groups, as a literacy center activity, for homework, or as a meaningful activity for when they have a substitute teacher!  

FREE Opinion Writing Graphic Organizers

Are you ready to begin Opinion Writing in your classroom? To help get you started, I am happy to offer you 3 FREE Opinion Writing Graphic Organizers! You can download them here .

The ability to state one’s opinion and support it with persuasive reasons is a valuable academic and LIFE skill!  I hope the information and resources I’ve shared today will help to bring stronger opinion writing instruction and more meaningful practice to your kindergarten, first and second-grade classrooms!

Be on the lookout for my next post that will focus on the final genre… Narrative Writing! I’ll share information and tips for teaching narrative writing, as well as give you details about my Narrative Writing Units for kindergarten , first and second-grade students!

-shop this post-

Kindergarten Opinion Writing Graphic Organizers & Centers

– PIN for LATER –

opinion writing 8th grade

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

Find what you need

  • MEET CHRISTINA
  • Shop teaching resources
  • Access your account
  • Privacy Policy

Teaching Resources

opinion writing 8th grade

Bliss in your Inbox

This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. See full disclosure here.​

Free Printable Fact vs. Opinion Worksheets for 8th Grade

Fact vs. Opinion: Discover a collection of free printable Reading & Writing worksheets for Grade 8 students, curated by Quizizz, to enhance their critical thinking and analytical skills in distinguishing facts from opinions.

quizizz-hero

Explore Fact vs. Opinion Worksheets by Grades

  • kindergarten

Explore Other Subject Worksheets for grade 8

  • Social studies
  • Social emotional
  • Foreign language
  • Reading & Writing

Explore printable Fact vs. Opinion worksheets for 8th Grade

Fact vs. Opinion worksheets for Grade 8 are an essential tool for teachers to help their students develop critical thinking skills and improve their reading and writing abilities. These worksheets are designed to engage students in analyzing and distinguishing between facts and opinions in various texts, fostering their understanding of the importance of evidence-based reasoning. By incorporating these worksheets into their lesson plans, teachers can provide students with ample opportunities to practice their reading comprehension strategies, ultimately enhancing their overall literacy skills. As students progress through the Grade 8 curriculum, the use of Fact vs. Opinion worksheets will not only strengthen their reading abilities but also prepare them for more advanced academic challenges.

Quizizz is an excellent platform for teachers to utilize in conjunction with Fact vs. Opinion worksheets for Grade 8, as it offers a variety of interactive quizzes and activities to reinforce students' reading and writing skills. With Quizizz, teachers can create customized quizzes that align with their lesson plans, allowing them to assess students' understanding of reading comprehension strategies and their ability to differentiate between facts and opinions. Additionally, Quizizz offers a vast library of pre-made quizzes and resources, covering a wide range of topics related to Reading & Writing for Grade 8. By incorporating Quizizz into their teaching strategies, educators can provide a dynamic and engaging learning experience for their students, ensuring they develop the necessary skills to excel in reading and writing throughout their academic careers.

  • Full curriculum
  • Multiplication
  • Creative writing

opinion writing 8th grade

Online Opinion & Narrative Writing Classes for 8th Graders

🎥 Engaging live video chat classes

🏅 Vetted and passionate teachers

🚀 Build confidence through progress

Mrs. Kirbie's Narrative Writing Camp

opinion writing 8th grade

Master Elementary Essay Writing; Informative, Persuasive, Narrative, & Opinion

opinion writing 8th grade

The Enchanted Inkwell: Narrative Essay Writing

opinion writing 8th grade

Argumentative, Informational, and Narrative Essay Writing Class

opinion writing 8th grade

5th-7Th Grade - Narrative Writing: Short Story

opinion writing 8th grade

9Th-12Th Grade - Narrative Writing: Short Story

opinion writing 8th grade

Write Right Now! Argumentative, Personal Narrative and More!

opinion writing 8th grade

Jubilant Tutoring: 1:1 You Choose the Topic Opinion Writing

opinion writing 8th grade

Persuasive Essay Writing Skills: How to Write About Your Opinions Effectively FLEX

opinion writing 8th grade

Be You & Become a Better Writer: Creative Narrative Story Writing, FLEX Class

opinion writing 8th grade

Jubilant Tutoring: 1:1 Narrative Prompt Writing for Theme, Character & Plot

Flex essay fusion:master narrative, expository, & persuasive 5-paragraph writing.

opinion writing 8th grade

Be You & Become a Better Writer: Creative Narrative Story Writing, FLEX - FAST Track

opinion writing 8th grade

Be You & Become a Better Writer: Creative Narrative Story Writing, 8-Week Course

opinion writing 8th grade

The Elegant Essay: Crafting Descriptive and Narrative Essays for Power and Punch

opinion writing 8th grade

Be You & Become a Better Writer: Personal Narratives 1, FLEX Class

opinion writing 8th grade

Be You & Become a Better Writer: Personal Narratives 2, FLEX Class

opinion writing 8th grade

Writing: Writing the Beginning

opinion writing 8th grade

Essentials in Writing: Advanced Writing!

opinion writing 8th grade

Writing: Introduction to Descriptive Writing

opinion writing 8th grade

Reviews for top 8th Grade Opinion & Narrative Writing classes

Parent submitted images.

opinion writing 8th grade

Reviews for 8th Grade Opinion & Narrative Writing classes

opinion writing 8th grade

Explore more in 8th grade

Explore more in middle school, articles you may find helpful.

opinion writing 8th grade

Financial Assistance 

Outschool international , get the app .

Get it on Google Play

More to Explore 

Classes by age , classes by grade .

opinion writing 8th grade

Will you share your cookies?

We use cookies to make our site better. Some cookies are necessary, but having extra cookies lets us personalize your experience. Read our cookie policy.

Brilliantio

8th Grade Journal Prompts: Spark Creativity and Reflection

By: Author Paul Jenkins

Posted on August 2, 2023

Categories Writing , Education , Journaling

Are you an 8th-grade teacher looking for ways to engage your students in writing? Or perhaps you’re an 8th grader who wants to improve your writing skills and explore your thoughts and feelings.

Either way, journal prompts can be an effective tool to achieve these goals. In this article, we will introduce you to the world of journal prompts, explain their benefits, and provide you with some ideas to get started.

Journal prompts are writing prompts designed to inspire you to write in a journal or diary. They can be open-ended questions, thought-provoking statements, or creative prompts that encourage you to explore your thoughts, feelings, and experiences.

Journal prompts can help you develop your writing skills, express yourself, and reflect on your life. They can also be a valuable tool for teachers to use in the classroom to engage students in writing and promote critical thinking.

Understanding journal prompts is crucial to getting the most out of them. By learning about the different types of journal prompts, you can choose the ones that best suit your needs and interests. You can also learn how to use journal prompts effectively to develop your writing skills and explore your thoughts and feelings.

In the following sections, we will explore the different types of journal prompts, provide you with some ideas for 8th graders, and discuss how to use journal prompts in the classroom.

Key Takeaways

  • Journal prompts are writing prompts designed to encourage you to write in a journal or diary.
  • There are different types of journal prompts, including open-ended questions, thought-provoking statements, and creative prompts.
  • Journal prompts can help you develop your writing skills, express yourself, and reflect on your life. They can also be used in the classroom to engage students in writing and promote critical thinking.

55 Journal Prompts for 8th Graders

Here are 55 journal writing prompts for 8th grade students:

1. Write about a time you felt really happy. What made you feel that way?

2. If you could switch lives with anyone for a day, who would it be and why?

3. What is your biggest regret from the past year? What would you do differently if you could?

4. Describe your perfect day. What does it look like from start to finish?

5. Who is your role model or hero? Why do you look up to them?

6. What is the kindest thing someone has ever done for you? How did it make you feel?

7. If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would you go and why?

8. What is your biggest fear? How do you think you can overcome it?

9. What is your biggest dream for the future? How can you start working toward it now?

10. What is your favorite childhood memory? Describe it in detail.

11. What is the most important lesson you’ve learned so far in life?

12. Describe a time you felt really proud of yourself.

13. What is your dream job? Why does that career appeal to you?

14. Who has been the biggest influence in your life so far? How have they impacted you?

15. What is the most courageous thing you’ve ever done? Why did it take courage?

16. Describe one of your role models. What do you admire most about them?

17. What is your favorite thing about yourself and why?

18. What is one thing you would change about school if you could?

19. What do you think your biggest accomplishment has been so far?

20. What is one of your best personality traits? Provide examples of how it helps you.

21. Describe one of your happiest memories from childhood. What made it so special?

22. Who do you admire in your life and why?

23. What have you learned about yourself over this past year?

24. What is your favorite book and why did you enjoy it?

25. What is the most adventurous thing you’ve ever done? Would you do it again?

26. What is your favorite family tradition? Why is it meaningful to you?

27. What is your favorite season and why? Describe what you enjoy about it.

28. If you could invent something that would help the world, what would it be?

29. What is the best advice you’ve ever received? Who gave it to you?

30. Describe one of your friends. What qualities do you admire in them?

31. What is one thing you hope to accomplish next year? What will you do to achieve it?

32. What is a cause you care about and why?

33. What is your favorite memory from this past year?

34. What was the most surprising thing you learned this year?

35. What was the strangest dream you’ve ever had? Describe it in detail.

36. If you could switch places with any fictional character, who would you choose?

37. What are you most looking forward to about becoming an adult?

38. Describe your perfect weekend. What does it include?

39. What is the most exciting thing that happened to you this year?

40. What is your favorite way to spend free time and why?

41. Who makes you laugh the most? What is it about them that you find funny?

42. What is your favorite movie? Provide details about the characters, plot, and setting.

43. What is one thing you are really good at? How did you get so good at it?

44. If you could be invisible for a day, what would you do?

45. What is the best gift you have ever received? What made it so meaningful?

46. Describe one of the best teachers you have ever had. What made them a great teacher?

47. What is your favorite family tradition? Why is it so special to you?

48. Who is your favorite musician or band? When did you start liking them?

49. What is the bravest thing you have ever said or done? What gave you the courage?

50. Describe one of the most beautiful places you have ever visited. What sights and sounds did you experience there?

51. What makes you laugh? Describe something funny that happened recently.

52. What is your favorite thing to do after school or on weekends?

53. Who is someone you really admire? Why do you look up to them?

54. If you could switch any two movie characters, what switch would lead to the most entertaining story?

55. What is your favorite quote or saying? What does it mean to you?

Understanding Journal Prompts

Journal prompts are writing prompts that are used to inspire and guide you in your journaling practice. They are a great tool for 8th graders to develop their writing skills and express their thoughts and emotions. In this section, we will discuss the purpose of journal prompts and the benefits of journaling.

Purpose of Journal Prompts

The purpose of journal prompts is to give you a starting point for your writing. They can help you explore different topics and ideas that you may not have thought about otherwise.

Journal prompts can also help you to reflect on your experiences and emotions, which can be a valuable tool for personal growth.

Journal prompts can be used in a variety of ways. You can use them to write about your day, your goals, your dreams, or anything else that comes to mind. They can also be used to explore specific themes or topics, such as gratitude, mindfulness, or self-care.

Benefits of Journaling

Journaling has many benefits for 8th graders. It can help you to improve your writing skills, develop your creativity, and express your thoughts and emotions in a safe and private space. Here are some of the key benefits of journaling:

  • Improves Writing Skills : Journaling regularly can help you to improve your writing skills, including grammar, punctuation, and sentence structure. This can be especially helpful for 8th graders who are preparing for high school.
  • Develops Creativity : Journaling can help you to develop your creativity by encouraging you to think outside the box and explore new ideas and perspectives.
  • Reduces Stress and Anxiety : Writing in a journal can be a cathartic and therapeutic experience that can help to reduce stress and anxiety.
  • Promotes Self-Reflection : Journaling can help you to reflect on your experiences and emotions, which can be a valuable tool for personal growth and self-discovery.
  • Boosts Memory : Writing in a journal can help you to remember important details and events, which can be especially helpful for 8th graders who are preparing for exams and tests.

In conclusion, journal prompts are a great tool for 8th graders to develop their writing skills, express their thoughts and emotions, and promote personal growth. By using journal prompts regularly, you can improve your writing skills, develop your creativity, and reduce stress and anxiety.

Types of Journal Prompts

When it comes to journal prompts, there are different types that you can use to help 8th graders improve their writing skills. Here are some of the most common types of journal prompts that you can use:

Creative Writing Prompts

Creative writing prompts are designed to encourage students to use their imagination and creativity. These prompts can be anything from describing a fictional character to creating a story about a magical land.

Creative writing prompts can help students develop their writing skills by allowing them to explore different writing styles and techniques.

Expository Writing Prompts

Expository writing prompts are designed to help students explain or describe something. These prompts can be anything from explaining how to do something to describing the characteristics of a particular animal. Expository writing prompts can help students develop their writing skills by teaching them how to organize their thoughts and ideas in a clear and concise manner.

Narrative Writing Prompts

Narrative writing prompts are designed to help students tell a story. These prompts can be anything from describing a personal experience to creating a fictional story.

Narrative writing prompts can help students develop their writing skills by teaching them how to create a plot, develop characters, and use descriptive language.

Opinion Writing Prompts

Opinion writing prompts are designed to help students express their opinions on a particular topic. These prompts can be anything from discussing the benefits of exercise to debating the pros and cons of social media. Opinion writing prompts can help students develop their writing skills by teaching them how to support their opinions with evidence and facts.

Fiction Writing Prompts

Fiction writing prompts are designed to help students create a fictional story. These prompts can be anything from describing a character’s journey to creating a story about a haunted house.

Fiction writing prompts can help students develop their writing skills by teaching them how to create a plot, develop characters, and use descriptive language.

Incorporating different types of journal prompts can help 8th graders improve their writing skills and develop their creativity. By using a variety of prompts, you can keep students engaged and motivated to write.

Developing Writing Skills

Writing is an essential skill that every 8th grader needs to develop before entering high school. Writing helps you express your thoughts and ideas, and it also helps you communicate effectively. In this section, we will discuss how you can improve your writing skills and practice critical thinking through journal prompts.

Improving Writing Skills

Improving your writing skills takes time and practice. Here are some tips that can help you:

  • Read a lot: Reading is one of the best ways to improve your writing skills. When you read, you learn new words, sentence structures, and writing styles. You can also learn how to write different types of texts, such as essays, stories, and articles.
  • Write every day: Writing every day can help you develop a writing habit and improve your writing skills. You can start by writing in a journal, writing short stories, or writing essays.
  • Get feedback: Getting feedback from others can help you identify your strengths and weaknesses as a writer. You can ask your teacher, parent, or friend to read your writing and give you feedback.

Practicing Critical Thinking

Critical thinking is an important skill that helps you analyze and evaluate information. Here are some journal prompts that can help you practice critical thinking:

  • Write about a current event and analyze its impact on society.
  • Write about a book you read and evaluate its themes, characters, and plot.
  • Write about a problem you faced and analyze different solutions to it.

By practicing critical thinking through journal prompts, you can develop your analytical skills and become a better writer.

In conclusion, developing your writing skills and practicing critical thinking are essential for success in high school and beyond. By following these tips and using journal prompts, you can improve your writing skills and become a better thinker.

Exploring Feelings and Thoughts

As an 8th grader, you might be going through a lot of changes in your life. Journaling is a great way to explore your feelings and thoughts and make sense of them. In this section, we’ll explore how you can use journal prompts to reflect on your emotions and express your thoughts.

Reflecting on Feelings

Reflecting on your feelings can help you understand yourself better. It’s important to acknowledge your emotions and not suppress them. Here are some journal prompts that can help you reflect on your feelings:

  • What emotions do you feel most often?
  • What triggers those emotions?
  • How do you usually cope with your emotions?
  • Is there a particular emotion that you find difficult to express?
  • What makes you feel happy, sad, angry, or anxious?

Answering these prompts can help you gain a deeper understanding of your emotions and how they affect your life.

Expressing Thoughts

Journaling is a great way to express your thoughts and ideas without any judgment. You can write about anything that comes to your mind, even if it seems silly or insignificant. Here are some prompts that can help you express your thoughts:

  • What are some of your goals for the future?
  • What do you like about yourself?
  • What are some things that you’re grateful for?
  • What are some challenges that you’re currently facing?
  • What are some things that you’re looking forward to?

Writing about your thoughts and ideas can help you organize them and make them more concrete. It can also help you come up with new ideas and solutions to problems.

In conclusion, journaling is a great way to explore your feelings and thoughts. By reflecting on your emotions and expressing your thoughts, you can gain a deeper understanding of yourself and your life. Try to set aside some time every day to write in your journal, even if it’s just for a few minutes. You might be surprised at how much insight you can gain from it!

Prompt Ideas for 8th Graders

As an 8th grader, you may find yourself struggling to come up with ideas for journal prompts. Here are some ideas to get you started:

Personal Experience Prompts

Reflecting on your own experiences can be a great way to start journaling. Here are some personal experience prompts to consider:

  • Write about a time when you overcame a challenge.
  • Describe a moment that made you feel proud.
  • Write about a time when you had to make a tough decision.
  • Describe a moment when you felt like you made a positive impact on someone else’s life.

Dream and Future Prompts

As an 8th grader, you may be starting to think about your future and what you want to achieve. Here are some dream and future prompts to consider:

  • Describe your dream job and what it would be like.
  • Write about a goal you have for the future and how you plan to achieve it.
  • Describe a place you would like to visit and why.
  • Write about a skill or talent you would like to develop in the future.

Family and Friends Prompts

Your family and friends are an important part of your life, and writing about them can help you reflect on your relationships. Here are some family and friends prompts to consider:

  • Write about a family member who has influenced you in a positive way.
  • Describe your best friend and what you admire about them.
  • Write about a time when you had a conflict with a friend and how you resolved it.
  • Describe a family tradition that is important to you.

School and Community Prompts

Your school and community are also important parts of your life, and writing about them can help you reflect on your experiences. Here are some school and community prompts to consider:

  • Write about a teacher who has had a positive impact on you.
  • Describe a volunteer experience you have had and what you learned from it.
  • Write about a current event that is important to you and why.
  • Describe a place in your community that is special to you.

Technology and Society Prompts

As an 8th grader, you are growing up in a world that is heavily influenced by technology and society. Here are some technology and society prompts to consider:

  • Write about a social media platform that you use and how it has impacted your life.
  • Describe a piece of technology that you think will be important in the future.
  • Write about a current event related to technology or society that concerns you.
  • Describe a way that technology has changed the way you communicate with others.

These are just a few ideas to get you started with journaling. Remember, the most important thing is to write honestly and reflect on your own experiences.

Using Journal Prompts in the Classroom

Journal prompts are an excellent tool for teachers to engage their 8th-grade students in writing activities. By using journal prompts, you can encourage students to write about their thoughts, feelings, and experiences, which can help improve their writing skills and critical thinking abilities.

Here are some ways you can incorporate journal prompts in the classroom.

Group Projects

Journal prompts can be used as a starting point for group projects. Assign a prompt to each group and have them discuss and brainstorm ideas related to the prompt. For example, if the prompt is “What are the most significant challenges facing teenagers today?” the group can discuss issues like bullying, social media, and mental health. The group can then use their ideas to create a project, like a poster or presentation, that addresses the prompt.

Class Participation

Journal prompts can also be used to encourage class participation. Assign a prompt at the beginning of class and ask students to write about it for a few minutes. Then, have students share their responses with the class. This can help students become more comfortable sharing their thoughts and ideas in a group setting. Additionally, it can help create a more inclusive classroom environment where everyone’s voice is heard.

Finally, journal prompts can be used to supplement classroom education. Assign prompts that relate to topics covered in class and ask students to reflect on what they’ve learned.

For example, if you’re teaching a history lesson on World War II, assign a prompt that asks students to write about the impact of the war on society. This can help students better understand the material and engage with it on a deeper level.

In conclusion, journal prompts are a valuable tool that can be used in a variety of ways in the classroom. By incorporating prompts into group projects, class participation, and education, teachers can help students improve their writing skills, critical thinking abilities, and overall engagement with the material.

Resources for Journal Prompts

As an 8th grader, you may find yourself struggling to come up with ideas for journal prompts. Fortunately, there are many resources available to help you get started. Here are some options to consider:

8th Grade Writing Worksheets

Writing worksheets can be a great way to get ideas for journal prompts. These worksheets are designed to help you develop your writing skills and provide you with prompts to get you started. Some popular websites that offer 8th grade writing worksheets include Education.com and K12Reader.com. These websites offer a variety of worksheets on different topics, including creative writing, expository writing, and persuasive writing.

Writing Resources Online

There are also many online resources that can help you come up with ideas for journal prompts. One popular website is JournalBuddies.com, which offers a wide range of prompts designed specifically for 8th graders. Another great resource is KidsnClicks.com, which offers 80 journal prompts for kids that are both fun and inspiring.

If you’re looking for more general writing resources, you might consider websites like Grammarly.com or the Purdue Online Writing Lab. These websites offer tips and advice on writing, as well as resources like grammar checkers and citation generators.

Overall, there are many resources available to help you come up with ideas for journal prompts. Whether you prefer worksheets or online resources, there’s sure to be something out there that can help you get started on your writing journey.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some creative writing topics for 8th graders.

There are many creative writing topics that 8th graders can explore. Some ideas include writing about a fictional world, creating a character and describing their life, writing a short story, or writing a poem. You can also write about your favorite hobby, a place you have visited, or a person who inspires you.

What are some emotional journal prompts for middle school students?

Emotional journal prompts can help middle school students explore their feelings and emotions. Some examples include writing about a time when you felt really happy, a time when you felt really sad, or a time when you felt really angry. You can also write about your fears, your dreams, or your goals.

How can 8th graders improve their writing skills?

There are many ways for 8th graders to improve their writing skills. One way is to read more often, which can help you learn new vocabulary and sentence structures. Another way is to practice writing every day, even if it’s just for a few minutes. You can also ask for feedback from your teacher or peers, and work on revising and editing your writing.

What are some free resources for journal prompts for 8th graders?

There are many free resources available for journal prompts for 8th graders. You can find prompts online, in books, or from your teacher. Some websites that offer free journal prompts include Journal Buddies, Waterford, and The Mindful Page.

What should be included in an 8th grade journal entry?

An 8th grade journal entry should include your thoughts, feelings, and reflections on a particular topic. It should be written in your own voice, and should be honest and authentic. You can also include any relevant details or experiences that help to support your ideas.

How can 8th graders use journaling to reflect on their personal growth?

Journaling can be a great way for 8th graders to reflect on their personal growth. You can write about your goals, your accomplishments, and your challenges. You can also write about how you have changed over time, and what you have learned about yourself. By reflecting on your personal growth, you can gain a better understanding of who you are and where you want to go in life.

We can’t trust SFUSD to reinstate eighth-grade algebra. Voters must weigh in

San Francisco’s school board meant well when it dropped eighth-grade algebra. But students have fled, and the district should learn its lesson.

An illustrated library with students studying, large windows overlooking trees, and a tall bookshelf where books are locked in a cabinet.

  • Copy link to this article

When did you learn algebra? At my public school in Michigan, I took algebra in the eighth grade. 

This is still the standard today. Most school districts in the San Francisco Bay Area teach introductory algebra in the eighth grade. Some even let seventh graders take it when they show eagerness and ability in math. 

Yet in San Francisco, Algebra 1 has not been offered until ninth grade for the past decade. Our public schools stopped letting eighth graders take algebra in 2014 because of concerns about a racial gap in algebra completion rates.

It was a well-intentioned policy. The goal was to stop segmenting kids based on ability and keep all students together until everyone was prepared to take advanced math classes.

But the policy failed. A study by Stanford University showed the policy didn’t help kids who were behind in math. It only held back kids who love math. And we lost many of those kids when their parents pulled them out of public school.

We have a tale of two school systems in San Francisco. Nearly a third of our kids attend private school, compared with only 10% statewide, according to Private School Review. A policy against eighth-grade algebra is a big factor when families decide to leave public schools when their child reaches middle school.

Rex Ridgeway advocates for eighth-grade algebra because his granddaughter Joselyn, a senior at Lincoln High School, loves math. Waiting until ninth grade to begin learning algebra would have kept her from achieving mastery by high school graduation, so he spent several thousand dollars to enroll her in summer classes. Ridgeway notes that many college majors require algebra—for instance, 78 majors at the University of San Diego begin with calculus.

Not every student who loves math has a family that can afford private school or private classes. Bringing algebra back to public middle school is also an equity issue. 

Every San Francisco resident should care about algebra because well-run public schools are essential for a city to function and thrive. Families leave San Francisco for many reasons, including public safety and education. Our future depends on keeping families here—and algebra is a key part of the equation. 

This is why I introduced a ballot measure urging San Francisco’s public schools to let kids take algebra by the eighth grade. Proposition G is on the March 5 ballot.

San Francisco’s public school enrollment is in decline . Bringing algebra back could help reverse that trend and generate more school funding. As more families return to public schools for algebra, enrollment will increase, along with the state funding tied to the number of students.

Parents made algebra an issue in the 2022 school board recalls, and their advocacy pushed the school district officials to reluctantly consider it. 

The district wouldn’t have come this far to bring algebra back without the political pressure of Prop. G. When I first proposed the measure, the school district quickly formed a committee to restore algebra in middle school. They hoped Prop. G would go away.

But I put algebra on the ballot because the school district needs the political pressure to do the right thing and be held accountable. The district had delayed bringing algebra back to eighth grade after knowing for many years that the decadelong ban was a failed policy.

Just a few weeks before voters will consider Prop. G, the school board finally agreed to bring algebra back to middle school. While it’s a good first step, wary parents aren’t cheering—because kids still have to wait three more academic years.

The school board voted to bring back algebra piecemeal by the 2026-27 school year, giving the superintendent leeway to figure out how to do it. One proposal would limit an algebra pilot to only a third of San Francisco middle schools next year, with the remaining schools to get algebra after two years. That would mean most of today’s sixth graders are out of luck. Kids who are not part of the pilot and want to learn algebra would have to do so in summer school or online.

Parents don’t trust the district’s promise to bring back algebra over multiple years because they have seen school board plans go off the rails too often before.

That’s why Prop. G is necessary. Parents deserve to be heard. Kids in San Francisco deserve the same algebra taught in nearly every Bay Area city—and the school board needs to know our families won’t settle for anything less.

Joel Engardio is a member of the Board of Supervisors, representing District 4 . He has served on the boards of two of San Francisco's largest political organizations: the Alice B. Toklas LGBTQ Democratic Club and the United Democratic Club, and as a member of the San Francisco Democratic County Central Committee.

Filed Under

IMAGES

  1. 014 Essay Example Receiving Award Narrative Writing Prompt Worksheet

    opinion writing 8th grade

  2. 51 Great Opinion Writing Prompts for 1st Grade Students

    opinion writing 8th grade

  3. 50+ 8th-grade writing prompts : Creative & Persuasive

    opinion writing 8th grade

  4. free opinion writing printable kindermommacom 1st grade writing

    opinion writing 8th grade

  5. 1St Grade Opinion Writing

    opinion writing 8th grade

  6. Guide to Writing an Opinion Essay

    opinion writing 8th grade

COMMENTS

  1. The Ultimate Guide to Opinion Writing for Students and Teachers

    OPINION WRITING CRITERIA TO ADDRESS. 1. Identify the Audience: Speak Clearly. Writing is about language and language is about communication; students should understand that we do not write in a vacuum. The purpose of an essay, letter, or any other form of writing we care to name, is ultimately to be read.

  2. Free Printable Opinion Writing Worksheets for 8th Grade

    Opinion Writing worksheets for Grade 8 are an essential tool for teachers to help students develop their reading and writing skills, particularly in the area of nonfiction writing. These worksheets provide a structured approach to teaching students how to express their thoughts and ideas effectively, while also enhancing their critical thinking ...

  3. PDF Grade 8 English Language Arts Opinion /Argument

    Writing Standards in Action - Grade 8 Opinion/Argument - Many Faiths (Version 1) "What should good student writing at this grade level look like?". The answer lies in the writing itself. The Writing Standards in Action. Project uses high quality student writing samples to illustrate what performance to grade level standards looks like—in ...

  4. Over 170 Prompts to Inspire Writing and Discussion

    During the 2020-21 school year, we asked 176 questions, and you can find them all below or here as a PDF. The questions are divided into two categories — those that provide opportunities for ...

  5. PDF Opinion/Argument Writing Packet Grades 3-6

    Progression of Opinion to Argument Writing 8 Persuasion vs. Argument 9 Opinion/Argument and College and Career Readiness - Michelle Karns 10 ... Standards for K-8 11-12 CCCS Anchor Paper Grade 4 13-14 CCCS Anchor Paper Grade 6 15-16 CCCS Writing Rubric for Grade 5-SAMPLE 17 Write a Sample Anchor Paper with Your Class 18 Gradual Release of ...

  6. 49 Opinion Writing Prompts for Students

    49 Opinion Writing Prompts for Students. One of the most common essay types is the opinion, or persuasive, essay. In an opinion essay, the writer states a point of view, then provides facts and reasoned arguments to support that viewpoint. The goal of the essay is to convince the reader to share the writer's opinion.

  7. 100 Interesting 8th Grade Writing Prompts

    These fun and interesting 8th-grade writing prompts will inspire older students to write longer and more in-depth work. ... Opinion writing is another part of the language arts Common Core for this age group. Prompts should inspire students to make claims, support those claims, and logically organize their work: ...

  8. PDF Grade 8 English Language Arts Opinion /Argument and Narrate

    Writing Standards in Action - Grade 8 Opinion/Argument & Narrate - Literary Interpretation. "What should good student writing at this grade level look like?". The answer lies in the writing itself. The Writing Standards in Action. Project uses high quality student writing samples to illustrate what performance to grade level standards looks ...

  9. Eighth Grade (Grade 8) Opinion Writing Questions

    You can create printable tests and worksheets from these Grade 8 Opinion Writing questions! Select one or more questions using the checkboxes above each question. Then click the add selected questions to a test button before moving to another page. Previous Page 1 of 4 Next. Select All Questions.

  10. Argument Writing Rubric for 8th grade

    Use this standards-based Argument Writing Rubric for 8th grade to assess your students' argument writing skills! This rubric covers the major standards of eighth-grade argument writing, including introduction, support, transitions, style, and conclusion.

  11. 8th grade writing

    8th grade writing. Teens forge their identities through writing — especially as they write opinion papers based on factual evidence. Verbal has a double meaning for eighth grade writing: it refers to the oral presentations the kids will do and to this year's focus on grammar — gerunds, participles, and infinitives.

  12. Opinion Writing for Kids

    Are you ready to write about your opinion? This series will lead you through all of the important steps to writing an opinion piece! In episode 1, you'll lea...

  13. Teaching Opinion Writing: 8 Must-Do Tips

    Keep reading to see our best tips for teaching opinion writing. 1. Start with a pre-assessment. The first must-do tip for teaching opinion writing is to start with a pre-assessment. The pre-assessment allows you to see how much students know so you can tailor your lessons appropriately and it allows you to measure student growth at the end of ...

  14. 33 Best Opinion-Writing Mentor Texts for the Classroom

    11. The Perfect Pet by Margie Palatini. Elizabeth crafts a plan to convince her parents to let her have a pet, with unexpected—but pleasing—results. This is our favorite opinion-writing mentor text for introducing kids to win-win solutions and encouraging them to suggest them in their own opinion writing.

  15. Browse Printable Opinion Writing Worksheets

    Opinion writing worksheets help your young learner express themselves in complete sentences. With plenty of writing prompts about food, animals, holidays, and more, students take on creative writing in new and fun ways. Created by educators, opinion writing worksheets take the guesswork out of sharing opinions at home or in the classroom.

  16. Opinion Writing Grade 8 Teaching Resources

    This Unpopular Opinions Lesson is a great get-to-know-you, team-building, or debate activity. It allows students to have the opportunity to share their perspectives and opinions o

  17. How to Teach Opinion Writing

    Tips for Teaching Opinion Writing. 1. Read Opinion Writing Mentor Texts. Before you can ask your students to write in a genre that is new to them, you must first immerse them in it. So to begin your unit, you'll want to share examples of opinion writing with your students.

  18. 30 Excellent 8th Grade Writing Prompts » JournalBuddies.com

    As students use these 8th Grade Writing Prompts and write about topics like what it means to be a part of a community and the hardest parts of getting older, they'll become more confident in who they are and where they're heading next—and they'll be ready to tackle whatever new hurdles come their way. Use these excellent 8th-grade ...

  19. 31 8th Grade Writing Ideas » JournalBuddies.com

    31 8th Grade Writing Ideas. Writing Ideas for 8th Graders— Students of all ages can benefit from writing daily journals—but journaling is an especially beneficial activity for young teens in 8 th grade who are preparing to graduate fro middle school and enter high school. Use these new writing prompts for 8 th graders to help your class ...

  20. Free Printable Fact vs. Opinion Worksheets for 8th Grade

    Quizizz is an excellent platform for teachers to utilize in conjunction with Fact vs. Opinion worksheets for Grade 8, as it offers a variety of interactive quizzes and activities to reinforce students' reading and writing skills. With Quizizz, teachers can create customized quizzes that align with their lesson plans, allowing them to assess ...

  21. Online Opinion & Narrative Writing Classes for 8th Graders

    Reviews for top 8th Grade Opinion & Narrative Writing classes. Parent submitted images. Reviews for 8th Grade Opinion & Narrative Writing classes. Elementary Writing: Write a Gratitude Journal. Misses Dee is an extremely patient teacher. In addition to providing clear writing instructions, she guides students...

  22. 8th Grade Journal Prompts: Spark Creativity and Reflection

    Opinion writing prompts can help students develop their writing skills by teaching them how to support their opinions with evidence and facts. Fiction Writing Prompts. ... 8th Grade Writing Worksheets. Writing worksheets can be a great way to get ideas for journal prompts. These worksheets are designed to help you develop your writing skills ...

  23. Yes! 8th Grade Writing Worksheets PDF » JournalBuddies.com

    Here you will find 8th grade writing worksheets pdfs, plus writing prompt and journal page pdfs. There are tons of great activities and tools you can use to make sure your eighth-grade students are prepared for high school—but one of the absolute best options is to have them start writing a daily journal. To help support you in your efforts ...

  24. Opinion

    This is why I introduced a ballot measure urging San Francisco's public schools to let kids take algebra by the eighth grade. Proposition G is on the March 5 ballot. San Francisco's public school enrollment is in decline. Bringing algebra back could help reverse that trend and generate more school funding.