Examples logo

16+ Photo Essay Examples & Samples in PDF

Photo Essay Examples

We all know that photographs tell a story. These still images may be seen from various perspectives and are interpreted in different ways. Oftentimes, photographers like to give dramatic meaning to various scenarios. For instance, a blooming flower signifies a new life. Photographs always hold a deeper meaning than what they actually are.

In essay writing , photographs along with its supporting texts, play a significant role in conveying a message. Here are some examples of these kinds of photo-text combinations.

What is Photo Essay?

A photo essay is a visual storytelling method that utilizes a sequence of carefully curated photographs to convey a narrative, explore a theme, or evoke specific emotions. It goes beyond individual images, aiming to tell a cohesive and impactful story through the arrangement and combination of pictures.

Components of a Photo Essay:

1. Introduction or Lead Photo:

The first photo serves as an introduction, capturing attention and setting the tone for the narrative.

2. Scene-setting Shots:

Establish the context and location through images that provide an overview of the environment or situation.

3. Detail Shots:

Close-up shots focus on specific elements or details, adding depth and nuance to the story.

4. Sequential Flow:

Photos are organized in a logical sequence to guide viewers through the narrative, creating a visual flow.

5. Captions and Text:

Captions or accompanying text provide context, background information, and insights, enhancing the viewer’s understanding.

6. Variety of Perspectives:

Incorporate a variety of perspectives, angles, and compositions to maintain visual interest.

7. Emotional Impact:

Use images that evoke emotions, allowing viewers to connect with the story on a personal level.

8. Conclusion or Closing Image:

Conclude the essay with a strong, conclusive image that leaves a lasting impression.

Examples of Photo Essay Topics:

  • Documenting a community event or festival
  • Exploring social issues or human rights topics
  • Capturing the daily life of a specific profession or community
  • Telling a personal journey or life experience
  • Portraying environmental changes or conservation efforts

Tips for Creating a Photo Essay:

1. Theme and Purpose:

Clearly define the theme or message you want to convey through your photo essay.

2. Planning and Research:

Plan your shots in advance, conduct research on the subject, and be prepared to adapt as the story unfolds.

3. Consistency in Style:

Maintain a consistent photographic style, including color schemes, editing techniques, and composition.

4. Narrative Flow:

Ensure a smooth and logical progression of images to guide viewers through the story.

5. Engaging Captions:

Craft captions that complement and enhance the visual elements, providing additional context or insights.

6. Viewer Consideration:

Keep your target audience in mind, considering how they will perceive and connect with the visual narrative.

Best Photo Essay Example?

One notable example of a powerful photo essay is “The Photographic Essay: Paul Fusco’s ‘RFK Funeral Train'” by Paul Fusco. This photo essay captures the emotional journey of the train carrying the body of Robert F. Kennedy from New York to Washington, D.C., after his assassination in 1968.

Fusco’s images beautifully and poignantly document the mourning and respect shown by people along the train route. The series is a moving portrayal of grief, unity, and the impact of a historical moment on the lives of ordinary individuals. The photographs are both artistically compelling and deeply human, making it a notable example of the potential for photo essays to convey complex emotions and historical narratives.

16+ Photo Essay Examples in PDF

1. narrative photo essay format example.

narrative photo essay

Size: 561 KB

2. Student Photo Example Example

student photo example

Size: 356 KB

3. Great Depression Essay Example

great depression essay

4. Example of Photo Essay

example of photo essay

Size: 549 KB

5. Photo Essay Examples About Nature

photo essay examples about nature

Size: 175 KB

What Is a Photo Essay?

From the name given, a photo essay is a written article consisting of a collection of images and texts. It has the ability to tell a story through a progression of events, emotions, and concepts. You see, there are times when photographs cannot stand alone.

You can present a picture of an old, worn-out chair and nobody will see it more than it is. If you create a photo essay to explain how such a chair was used by President Roosevelt, then people will begin to look at the photograph with awe. This is the same for free essays , as it is sometimes difficult to create mental images through mere wording.

Overall, a photo essay is still the same as a normal short essay , except that ideas are translated into visual images.

How to Write a Photo Essay

First of all, you would need to find a topic that you are interested in. With this, you can conduct thorough research on the topic that goes beyond what is common. This would mean that it would be necessary to look for facts that not a lot of people know about. Not only will this make your essay interesting, but this may also help you capture the necessary elements for your images.

Remember, the ability to manipulate the emotions of your audience will allow you to build a strong connection with them. Knowing this, you need to plan out your shots. With the different emotions and concepts in mind, your images should tell a story along with the essay outline .

6. Travel Photo Example

travel photo example2

Size: 13 MB

7. Free Photo Essay Example

free photo essay

Size: 369 KB

Purpose of a Photo Essay

With good writing skills , a person is able to tell a story through words. However, adding images for your essay will give it the dramatic effect it needs. The photographs and the text work hand in hand to create something compelling enough to attract an audience.

This connection goes beyond something visual, as photo essays are also able to connect with an audience emotionally. This is to create an essay that is effective enough to relay a given message.

5 Tips for Creating a Photo Essay

  • Don’t be afraid to experiment. Find the right angle and be dramatic with your description, just be creative.
  • Pay attention to detail. Chances are, your audience will notice every single detail of your photograph.
  • Shoot everything. Behind a single beautiful photo is a hundred more shots.
  • Don’t think twice about editing. Editing is where the magic happens. It has the ability to add more drama to your images.
  • Have fun. Don’t stress yourself out too much but instead, grow from your experience.

Most Interesting Photo Essays of 2019

Now that you are educated with the fundamentals of photo essays, why not lay eyes on some great photo essays for inspiration. To give you a glimpse of a few epitomes, we collected the best and fascinating photo essays for you. The handpicked samples are as follows:

8. Toys and Us

toys and us

Size: 211 KB

This photo essay presents its subject which is the latest genre of photography, toy photography. In this type of picture taking, the photographer aims to give life on the toys and treat them as his/her model. This photography follows the idea of a toy researcher, Katrina Heljakka, who states that also adults and not only children are interested in reimagining and preserving the characters of their toys with the means of roleplay and creating a story about these toys. This photo essay is based on the self-reflection of the author on a friend’s toys in their home environment.

9. The Faces of Nature Example

the faces of nature

This photo essay and collection caters the creativity of the author’s mind in seeing the world. In her composition, she justified that there are millions of faces that are naturally made that some of us have not noticed. She also presented tons of photos showing different natural objects that form patterns of faces. Though it was not mentioned in the essay itself, the author has unconsciously showcased the psychological phenomenon, pareidolia. This is the tendency to translate an obscure stimulus that let the observer see faces in inanimate objects or abstract patterns, or even hearing concealed messages in music.

10. The Country Doctor Example

the country doctor

Size: 228 KB

This photo essay depicts the medical hardships in a small rural town in Colorado called Kremling. For 23 days, Smith shadowed Dr. Ernest Ceriani, witnessing the dramatic life of the small town and capturing the woeful crisis of the region. The picture in this photographic essay was photographed by Smith himself for Life magazine in 1948 but remained as fascinating as it was posted weeks ago.

11. New York City Coffeehouses

new york city coffeehouses

Café Latte, cappuccino, espresso, or flat white—of course, you know these if you have visited a coffee shop at least once. However, the photographer of this photo essay took it to a whole new level of experience. Within two to three days of visiting various coffee places, Mr. Gavrysh stayed most of his day observing at the finest details such as the source of the coffee, the procedure of delivering them, and the process of roasting and grounding them. He also watched how did the baristas perfect the drinks and the reaction of the customers as they received their ordered coffee with delights in their faces. Gavrysh did not mean to compose a coffeehouse guide, but to make a composition that describes modern, local places where coffee is sipped and treated with respect.

12. Hungry Planet: What The World Eats

hungry planet

13. Photo Essay Example

photo essay example

14. Photo Essay in PDF

photo essay in pdf

Size: 75 KB

15. Sample Photo Essay Example

sample photo essay

Size: 194 KB

16. Basic Photo Essay Example

basic photo essay

Size: 587 KB

17. Printable Photo Essay Example

printable photo essay

Size: 399 KB

One of the basic necessity of a person to live according to his/her will is food. In this photo essay, you will see how these necessities vary in several ways. In 2005, a pair of Peter Menzel and Faith D’ Aluisio released a book that showcased the meals of an average family in 24 countries. Ecuador, south-central Mali, China, Mexico, Kuwait, Norway, and Greenland are among the nations they visited.  This photo essay is written to raise awareness about the influence of environment and culture to the cost and calories of the foods laid on the various dining tables across the globe.

Photo essays are not just about photographic aesthetics but also the stories that authors built behind those pictures. In this collection of captivating photo essays, reflect on how to write your own. If you are allured and still can’t get enough, there’s no need for you to be frantic about. Besides, there are thousands of samples and templates on our website to browse. Visit us to check them all out.

What are good topics for a photo essay?

1. Urban Exploration:

Document the unique architecture, street life, and cultural diversity of urban environments.

2. Environmental Conservation:

Capture the beauty of natural landscapes or document environmental issues, showcasing the impact of climate change or conservation efforts.

3. Everyday Life in Your Community:

Showcase the daily lives, traditions, and activities of people in your local community.

4. Family Traditions:

Document the customs, rituals, and special moments within your own family or another family.

5. Youth Culture:

Explore the lifestyle, challenges, and aspirations of young people in your community or around the world.

6. Behind-the-Scenes at an Event:

Provide a backstage look at the preparation and execution of an event, such as a concert, festival, or sports competition.

7. A Day in the Life of a Profession:

Follow a professional in their daily activities, offering insights into their work, challenges, and routines.

8. Social Issues:

Address important social issues like homelessness, poverty, immigration, or healthcare, raising awareness through visual storytelling.

9. Cultural Celebrations:

Document cultural festivals, ceremonies, or celebrations that showcase the diversity of traditions in your region or beyond.

10. Education Around the World:

Explore the various facets of education globally, from classrooms to the challenges students face in different cultures.

11. Workplace Dynamics:

Capture the atmosphere, interactions, and diversity within different workplaces or industries.

12. Street Art and Graffiti:

Document the vibrant and dynamic world of street art, capturing the expressions of local artists.

13. Animal Rescues or Shelters:

Focus on the efforts of organizations or individuals dedicated to rescuing and caring for animals.

14. Migration Stories:

Explore the experiences and challenges of individuals or communities affected by migration.

15. Global Food Culture:

Document the diversity of food cultures, from local markets to family meals, showcasing the role of food in different societies.

How do you start a picture essay?

1. Choose a Compelling Theme or Topic:

Select a theme or topic that resonates with you and has visual storytelling potential. It could be a personal project, an exploration of a social issue, or a visual journey through a specific place or event.

2. Research and Conceptualize:

Conduct research on your chosen theme to understand its nuances, context, and potential visual elements. Develop a conceptual framework for your photo essay, outlining the key aspects you want to capture.

3. Define Your Storytelling Approach:

Determine how you want to convey your narrative. Consider whether your photo essay will follow a chronological sequence, a thematic structure, or a more abstract and conceptual approach.

4. Create a Shot List:

Develop a list of specific shots you want to include in your essay. This can help guide your photography and ensure you capture a diverse range of images that contribute to your overall narrative.

5. Plan the Introduction:

Think about how you want to introduce your photo essay. The first image or series of images should grab the viewer’s attention and set the tone for the narrative.

6. Consider the Flow:

Plan the flow of your photo essay, ensuring a logical progression of images that tells a cohesive and engaging story. Consider the emotional impact and visual variety as you sequence your photographs.

7. Shoot with Purpose:

Start capturing images with your conceptual framework in mind. Focus on images that align with your theme and contribute to the overall narrative. Look for moments that convey emotion, tell a story, or reveal aspects of your chosen subject.

8. Experiment with Perspectives and Techniques:

Explore different perspectives, compositions, and photographic techniques to add visual interest and depth to your essay. Consider using a variety of shots, including wide-angle, close-ups, and detail shots.

9. Write Descriptive Captions:

As you capture images, think about the accompanying captions. Captions should provide context, additional information, or insights that enhance the viewer’s understanding of each photograph.

10. Review and Edit:

Regularly review and edit your collection of images. Ensure that each photo contributes meaningfully to the overall narrative. Consider the visual flow, composition, and the effectiveness of each image in telling your story.

11. Create a Strong Conclusion:

Plan a concluding set of images that leaves a lasting impression on the viewer. The final images should bring closure to your story and leave the audience with a strong takeaway.

12. Organize and Present:

Organize your images in a logical sequence and choose a platform for presenting your photo essay, whether it’s in a physical photo book, an online gallery, or through a slideshow.

What are the key elements of a photo essay?

1. Theme or Topic:

Clearly defined subject matter or theme that unifies the photographs and tells a cohesive story.

2. Narrative Structure:

An intentional narrative structure that guides the viewer through the photo essay, whether chronological, thematic, or conceptual.

3. Introduction:

A strong introduction that captures the viewer’s attention and sets the tone for the photo essay.

4. Captivating Images:

A series of high-quality and visually compelling images that effectively convey the chosen theme or story.

5. Variety of Shots:

A variety of shots, including wide-angle, close-ups, detail shots, and different perspectives, to add visual interest and depth.

6. Sequencing:

Careful sequencing of images to create a logical flow and emotional impact, guiding the viewer through the narrative.

7. Captions and Text:

Thoughtful captions or accompanying text that provide context, additional information, or insights, enhancing the viewer’s understanding.

8. Conclusion:

A concluding section that brings the photo essay to a satisfying close, leaving a lasting impression on the viewer.

9. Consistent Style:

Consistency in photographic style, including color schemes, editing techniques, and composition, for a cohesive visual experience.

10. Emotional Resonance:

The incorporation of images that evoke emotions and connect with the viewer on a personal or empathetic level.

11. Attention to Detail:

Attention to details that add depth and nuance to the story, helping to create a rich and immersive experience.

12. Organization and Presentation:

Thoughtful organization of the photo essay, whether in a physical photo book, an online gallery, or through a slideshow.

13. Impactful Conclusion:

A conclusion that leaves a strong impression, summarizing the narrative and leaving the viewer with a memorable takeaway.

14. Purposeful Editing:

Purposeful editing to select the strongest and most relevant images, ensuring each photograph contributes meaningfully to the overall story.

15. Viewer Engagement:

Consideration of the audience, aiming to engage and connect with viewers by addressing universal themes or issues.

16. Ethical Considerations:

Ethical considerations in the representation of subjects, ensuring respect, dignity, and sensitivity in the portrayal of individuals or communities.

FAQ’s

What is a photo essay for school?

A school photo essay is a visual storytelling project for educational purposes, typically assigned to students. It involves creating a narrative using a series of carefully curated photographs on a chosen theme.

How many pictures should be in a photo essay?

The number of pictures in a photo essay varies based on the chosen theme and narrative structure. It can range from a few impactful images to a more extensive series, typically around 10-20 photographs.

Is a photo essay a story?

Yes, a photo essay is a visual storytelling form. It uses a series of carefully curated photographs to convey a narrative, evoke emotions, or communicate a specific message or theme.

What makes a photo essay unforgettable?

An unforgettable photo essay is characterized by a powerful theme, emotionally resonant images, a well-crafted narrative structure, attention to detail, and a connection that leaves a lasting impact on viewers.

photo essay example for grade 6

AI Generator

Text prompt

  • Instructive
  • Professional

10 Examples of Public speaking

20 Examples of Gas lighting

Image retouching service

18 Immersive Photo Essay Examples & Tips

By Tata Rossi 13 days ago, Professional photography

photo essay example for grade 6

A photo essay tells a story or evokes emotion through a series of photographs. The essays allow you to be creative and fully explore an idea. Such essays exist in a variety of forms – from photos only to images with brief comments or written essays accompanied by shots. Choose a photo essay example that you can easily do based on your professional level and the equipment you use.

1. Protests

  • View the “Resistance” photo essay by David Moore .

A great idea for photo essays for students is to shoot the protest to show its power. You can capture people with signs and banners to demonstrate what they are standing for. Besides, you can learn how to capture moving subjects. Use the best example of photo essay and don’t forget about angles, composition, and framing.

To create a photo essay , go up to the front and photograph the leader of the protesters walking forward. After that, go back to the end of the group to take pictures of families joining the protest. As a result, you will gain experience shooting big groups of people in motion.

2. Transformation

  • View the “A Self-Portrait Every Day” photo essay by Noah Kalina .

This idea is all about capturing the way a person changes. You may take photos of a pregnant woman and then capture the same model with a child. By documenting the development of the child for several years, you can tell a great story in the form of a photo essay.

However, you can also create a photo essay about the transformation of different objects. For instance, you can create a time-lapse series to capture the history of a renovated building. While you will have to take a lot of similar photos to bring this idea to life, it will allow you to achieve an impressive result.

3. Local Event

  • View the “Monday Marathon” photo essay by Quinn G. Perini .

Whether you are a resident of a large city or a small town, you can find an opportunity to visit a local event, like a marathon or a festival. This is a nice chance to follow modern photography trends and bring photo essay ideas to life.

You can capture the before-and-after stages of the event. Arrive earlier and take pictures of the preparation activities, then shoot the actual event starting with the official beginning.

Keep photographing even when the event is over and capture the cleaning up and disassembling processes.

4. Photowalk

  • View the “Empty Campus” photo essay by Elise Trissel .

Explore the location where you live and find interesting objects to capture in the vicinity. Using the most interesting photo essay examples, you can decide how to make the best decisions. Don’t hurry and try to discover which angles you can use to capture the unique atmosphere of each place.

If you live in the city, you may capture architectural details, wide shots of busy streets, or just take photos of passersby and street signs. Think about the details that make every location unique. For instance, you can try capturing reflections to see how they allow you to see the city from an unusual angle. You can find reflections everywhere, so be sure to pay attention to mirrored buildings, puddles, and fountains.

5. Place Over Time

  • View the “At Home in the Ozarks” photo essay by Kylee Cole .

If you want to document changes and show how the streets, buildings, and parks in your city change over time, select your favorite locations and start to visit them regularly to capture the way they look during different seasons.

  • View the “Last Moments” photo essay by Ross Taylor .

You don’t necessarily have to focus on profound photo essay topics to evoke emotions. Capturing pets enjoying their worry-free and untroubled life seems like an easy but interesting activity.

Choose any animal – from a domestic bird to a dog, cat, or horse. For more emotional images, use such pet photography ideas when your pet is still a baby and recreate these shots when it is older or is in its final days.

7. Street Style

  • View the Tribal Street Photography photo essay by Hans Eijkelboom .

People often express themselves with the help of clothes. The way passers-by on the streets are dressed may reflect the clothing style of a whole society. That’s why you can travel around the world and capture people’s outfits in various areas. When taking portrait photos in the streets, you can also include some of the surroundings to put them in the context.

You can ask people in the streets to pose for you or try to capture them in movement. Select a suitable location for taking photos and create a photo essay to document what kinds of people one can meet in this location. When doing urban photography , you should ask people for permission before taking photos of them. You can ask their contacts and send them your photos later.

8. Abandoned Building

  • View the “Lost Collective” photo essay by Bret Pattman .

Old buildings are excellent architecture photography essay topics for students since you can capture a large number of elements. They allow you to imagine what a particular street looked like in the past. You may use a photo essay example for students as references.

Get approval before going in, but mind that such places are far from being totally safe. Bring various lenses: the macro lenses – for details and the wide-angle one – when you want to include many elements in one shot.

9. Alternative Lifestyles

  • View the “Last Nomad Hippies” photo essay by Roberto Palomo .

Some people decide to lead a lifestyle that differs from the one generally accepted by society. Explore different areas and look for people with an unusual way of living. You can capture candid photos of regular people or take pictures of a person with an unusual hobby.

Take pictures of those, who reside in extraordinary conditions, representatives of various subcultures, or the LBGTQ community. These photo essay topics show other people that it is okay to go out of their comfort zone and run against the wind.

10. Social Issues

  • View the “Juveniles in Prison” photo essay by Isadora Kosofsky .

The best photo essay examples for students are related to social issues, like unemployment, domestic violence, gender discrimination, and more. Address the topic carefully and look for a proper perspective.

Your shots may draw the people’s attention to a truly burning and relevant matter and have a stronger effect than any text.

11. Behind the Scenes

  • View the “Follow Me” photo essay by Marius Masalar .

If you are going to visit an event, get ready to take some behind-the-scenes photos. For instance, you can document the preparations for a festival. Capture the work of the lead event planner and other professionals to tell the story of the festival from an unusual angle.

Alternatively, you can capture the events happening backstage during a drama production. Take pictures of actors and actresses when they are getting ready for the performance. Try capturing the emotions of the main lead and show how stage workers make final preparations. You can also document the work of designers and makeup professionals.

12. Landmarks

  • View the “Volte-Face” photo essay by Oliver Curtis .

The pictures of landmarks are typically taken from a certain spot. One of the best photo essay ideas is to try shooting sights from various angles. You will also have an opportunity to improve your composition and your framing skills.

If you take a look at any pictorial essay example, you will see that the variety of perspectives is endless: through the streets, in the morning, afternoon, and evening, with a drone or including reflections.

    • View the “Family” photo essay by Olivia Moore .

You can capture the way family members interact with each other and demonstrate the strong connection they share. In some cases, it makes sense to focus on capturing candid photos when doing family photography .

However, you may also opt for a different approach and focus on more difficult social topics. For instance, if you want to examine the issue of immigration, you can take pictures of a family from another country. In addition, you may show how families cope with other social issues, including poverty or unequal access to healthcare.

14. A Day in the Life

  • View the “A Day in the Life of Carlos Gaytan” photo essay by Sandy Noto .

One of the best photo essays concepts is related to a day in a person’s life. The main character can be any person – a relative, family member, teacher, writer, or policeman.

People are generally interested in finding out facts about the lives and daily routines of others. The life of every human is incredible, especially if you learn it in more detail. This idea is especially suitable for taking documentary photos. For instance, you can select any photo essay sample you like and then capture a portrait of a person with the tools they use for their work.

15. Education

  • View the “School Day” photo essay by Nancy Borowick .

You can also take great photos in the classroom capturing the interactions of teachers and their students. Avoid distracting them, as it will be easier for you to take natural shots. Using a variety of settings, you can make your photo essay more engaging. For instance, you may visit chemistry labs, capture teachers during a break, and take photos in other locations.

  • View the “Meals From the Motherland” photo essay by James Tran .

You can also focus on specific meals to create a professional photo essay about food. To make it more attention-grabbing, try using different food photography ideas .

For instance, you can take photos of popular meals, capture the meals made by a specific person, or document cooking traditions in different countries. When taking photos in a restaurant, pay attention to the surroundings as well to capture the unique atmosphere of a place.

17. Capture the Neighbors

  • View the “Our Neighbors” photo essay by Jeanne Martin .

Regardless of the place where you live, you have to establish good relationships with your neighbors. People who live nearby can also be great models for professionals who specialize in portrait photography. To implement this idea, make sure to capture people at home or in front of their houses to include some of the surroundings in your photo essay.

You will discover many interesting facts about people who live nearby. Shooting a photo essay will allow you to learn them better and establish a strong connection with them. This way, you can create a sense of community and discover what holds its members together.

18. Climate Change

  • View the “Effects of Climate Change” photo essay by Sanya Gupta .

It is possible to a variety of photo story ideas bring to life examining the impact of climate change. Travel to places most affected by climate change, for instance, glaciers or famous resorts.

Capture the way the continuous drought has influenced the environment, animals, and the inhabitants. As an alternative, take pictures of environmentalist protests or inexhaustible energy sources.

Photo Essay Tips for Students

Explore your topic . An in-depth exploration of the main topic of your photo essay will help you find the best ideas for conveying your message. You can also find some sources for inspiration and useful materials. This stage allows you to learn more about your subject and select the best way of organizing your photo essay.

Create a storyboard . Using a storyboard, you can better understand what shots you need to take and what order can help you to tell a story in the best way. It will also allow you to create the right mood.

Take as many pictures as you can . To create a compelling story, make sure to take a lot of photos. It will allow you to choose the best pictures for your photo essay. Besides, you will always have backup photos if some of your pictures get damaged.

Experiment with different techniques . By changing the angle and using a variety of editing techniques, you can transform the way your photos look. When taking photos, try using different angles to capture the subject in the best way. You can also try changing the distance from the model, using black-and-white film, or employing a range of developing methods.

Add text . While some photographers create photo essays without text, it can still help you bring your point across more clearly and make it easier for a viewer to understand what you imply. By providing extra information, such as some facts, you can change the perception of your image. If you don’t know how to write descriptions, you can hire a professional writer to perform this task.

Enhance your photos . To edit your pictures, make sure to use professional photo editing software like Adobe Lightroom or Photoshop. Using the available tools, you can improve and change your photos. They allow you to fix issues with lighting, adjust WB, make colors richer, crop your pics to improve the composition, and perform other tasks. In case you need to edit your photos in a consistent style, you can use Photoshop Actions or Lightroom Presets.

In some cases, your pictures may require more advanced editing. If you see that your skills are insufficient or if you don’t have enough time, you can outsource the task of enhancing your photos to the FixThePhoto team. They will professionally enhance your pictures for a budget price. Their prices start from $1.50 per photo.

Want to Get a Professionally-Retouched Photo Essay?

The editing team at FixThePhoto specializes in delivering personalized and artistically enhanced photo essay, making sure to meet all your preferences. They can assist with different tasks, whether it's selecting the best shots or doing detailed retouching work.

Bonus Tools

To streamline your workflow and quickly edit your essay photos like a pro, make sure to apply these actions to your photos. Even if you use a photo essay example when taking pictures, you can utilize these actions to give your images a professional feel, tweak colors, edit lighting, and improve the overall look of your pics.

In this bundle, you will find actions created by experienced professionals who used recent photo enhancement trends to create convenient editing tools. Here, you will find a collection of brushes, patterns, overlays, and other effects for editing your photos in a realistic way.

  • Photo essay examples
  • Photo essay tips
  • Bonus tools

Photography Inspiration

  • Video Editing Services
  • Virtual Staging Services
  • Outsource Photo Editing
  • Retouching Tips
  • Photo Editing Freebies
  • Free Raw Images for Retouching
  • Free Photoshop Actions
  • Free Lightroom Presets
  • Affiliate Program
  • Privacy Policy
  • Cookie Policy

SAVE UP TO 60% OFF

  • Student Successes
  • My Learning

17 Awesome Photo Essay Examples You Should Try Yourself

photo essay example for grade 6

You can also select your interests for free access to our premium training:

If you’re looking for a photo essay example (or 17!), you’ve come to the right place. But what is the purpose of a photo essay? A photo essay is intended to tell a story or evoke emotion from the viewers through a series of photographs. They allow you to be creative and fully explore an idea. But how do you make one yourself? Here’s a list of photo essay examples. Choose one that you can easily do based on your photographic level and equipment.

Top 17 Photo Essay Examples

Here are some fantastic ideas to get you inspired to create your own photo essays!

17. Photograph a Protest

Street photography of a group of people protesting.

16. Transformation Photo Essays

A photo essay example shot of a couple, the man kissing the pregnant womans stomach

15. Photograph the Same Place

A photo essay example photography grid of 9 photographs.

14. Create a Photowalk

Street photography photo essay shot of a photographer in the middle of the street

13. Follow the Change

Portrait photography of a man shaving in the mirror. Photo essay examples.

12. Photograph a Local Event

Documentary photography essay of a group of people at an event by a lake.

11. Photograph an Abandoned Building

Atmospheric and dark photo of the interior of an abandoned building as part of a photo-essay

10. Behind the Scenes of a Photo Shoot

Photograph of models and photographers behind the scenes at a photo shoot. Photo essay ideas.

9. Capture Street Fashion

Street photography portrait of a girl outdoors at night.

8. Landmark Photo Essay

9 photo grid of the Eiffel tour. Photo essays examples.

7. Fathers & Children

An essay photo of the silhouettes of a man and child standing in a dark doorway.

6. A Day In the Life

 Photo essay examples of a bright red and orange building under blue sky.

5. Education Photo Essay

Documentary photoessay example shot of a group of students in a classroom watching their teacher

4. Fictitious Meals

 Photo essay detail of someone placing a sugar cube into a cup of tea.

3. Photograph Coffee Shops Using Cafenol

A photo of a coffee shop interior created with cafenol.

2. Photograph the Photographers

Street photography of a group of media photographers.

1. Capture the Neighbors

Street photography of 2 pink front doors of brick houses.

Photo essays tell stories. And there are plenty of amazingly interesting stories to tell! Photographing photo essays is a great way to practice your photography skills while having fun. You might even learn something! These photo essay examples are here to provide you with the inspiration to go out and tell your own stories through photos!

Popular Content

photo essay example for grade 6

Pictures That Tell Stories: Photo Essay Examples

laptop with someone holding film reel

Like any other type of artist, a photographer’s job is to tell a story through their pictures. While some of the most creative among us can invoke emotion or convey a thought with one single photo, the rest of us will rely on a photo essay.

In the following article, we’ll go into detail about what a photo essay is and how to craft one while providing some detailed photo essay examples.

What is a Photo Essay? 

A photo essay is a series of photographs that, when assembled in a particular order, tell a unique and compelling story. While some photographers choose only to use pictures in their presentations, others will incorporate captions, comments, or even full paragraphs of text to provide more exposition for the scene they are unfolding.

A photo essay is a well-established part of photojournalism and have been used for decades to present a variety of information to the reader. Some of the most famous photo essayists include Ansel Adams , W. Eugene Smith, and James Nachtwey. Of course, there are thousands of photo essay examples out there from which you can draw inspiration.

Why Consider Creating a Photo Essay?

As the old saying goes, “a picture is worth 1000 words.” This adage is, for many photographers, reason enough to hold a photo essay in particularly high regard.

For others, a photo essay allow them to take pictures that are already interesting and construct intricate, emotionally-charged tales out of them. For all photographers, it is yet another skill they can master to become better at their craft.

As you might expect, the photo essay have had a long history of being associated with photojournalism. From the Great Depression to Civil Rights Marches and beyond, many compelling stories have been told through a combination of images and text, or photos alone. A photo essay often evokes an intense reaction, whether artistic in nature or designed to prove a socio-political point.

Below, we’ll list some famous photo essay samples to further illustrate the subject.

Women holding polaroid

Become the photographer you were born to be.

Join Cole’s Classroom

Famous Photo Essays

“The Great Depression” by Dorothea Lange – Shot and arranged in the 1930s, this famous photo essay still serves as a stark reminder of The Great Depression and Dust Bowl America . Beautifully photographed, the black and white images offer a bleak insight to one of the country’s most difficult times.

“The Vietnam War” by Philip Jones Griffiths – Many artists consider the Griffiths’ photo essay works to be some of the most important records of the war in Vietnam. His photographs and great photo essays are particularly well-remembered for going against public opinion and showing the suffering of the “other side,” a novel concept when it came to war photography.

Various American Natural Sites by Ansel Adams – Adams bought the beauty of nature home to millions, photographing the American Southwest and places like Yosemite National Park in a way that made the photos seem huge, imposing, and beautiful.

“Everyday” by Noah Kalina – Is a series of photographs arranged into a video. This photo essay features daily photographs of the artist himself, who began taking capturing the images when he was 19 and continued to do so for six years.

“Signed, X” by Kate Ryan – This is a powerful photo essay put together to show the long-term effects of sexual violence and assault. This photo essay is special in that it remains ongoing, with more subjects being added every year.

Common Types of Photo Essays

While a photo essay do not have to conform to any specific format or design, there are two “umbrella terms” under which almost all genres of photo essays tend to fall. A photo essay is thematic and narrative. In the following section, we’ll give some details about the differences between the two types, and then cover some common genres used by many artists.

⬥ Thematic 

A thematic photo essay speak on a specific subject. For instance, numerous photo essays were put together in the 1930s to capture the ruin of The Great Depression. Though some of these presentations followed specific people or families, they mostly told the “story” of the entire event. There is much more freedom with a thematic photo essay, and you can utilize numerous locations and subjects. Text is less common with these types of presentations.

⬥ Narrative 

A narrative photo essay is much more specific than thematic essays, and they tend to tell a much more direct story. For instance, rather than show a number of scenes from a Great Depression Era town, the photographer might show the daily life of a person living in Dust Bowl America. There are few rules about how broad or narrow the scope needs to be, so photographers have endless creative freedom. These types of works frequently utilize text.

Common Photo Essay Genres

Walk a City – This photo essay is when you schedule a time to walk around a city, neighborhood, or natural site with the sole goal of taking photos. Usually thematic in nature, this type of photo essay allows you to capture a specific place, it’s energy, and its moods and then pass them along to others.

The Relationship Photo Essay – The interaction between families and loved ones if often a fascinating topic for a photo essay. This photo essay genre, in particular, gives photographers an excellent opportunity to capture complex emotions like love and abstract concepts like friendship. When paired with introspective text, the results can be quite stunning. 

The Timelapse Transformation Photo Essay – The goal of a transformation photo essay is to capture the way a subject changes over time. Some people take years or even decades putting together a transformation photo essay, with subjects ranging from people to buildings to trees to particular areas of a city.

Going Behind The Scenes Photo Essay – Many people are fascinated by what goes on behind the scenes of big events. Providing the photographer can get access; to an education photo essay can tell a very unique and compelling story to their viewers with this photo essay.

Photo Essay of a Special Event – There are always events and occasions going on that would make an interesting subject for a photo essay. Ideas for this photo essay include concerts, block parties, graduations, marches, and protests. Images from some of the latter were integral to the popularity of great photo essays.

The Daily Life Photo Essay – This type of photo essay often focus on a single subject and attempt to show “a day in the life” of that person or object through the photographs. This type of photo essay can be quite powerful depending on the subject matter and invoke many feelings in the people who view them.

Become the photographer of your dreams with Cole’s Classroom.

Start Free Trial

Photo Essay Ideas and Examples

One of the best ways to gain a better understanding of photo essays is to view some photo essay samples. If you take the time to study these executions in detail, you’ll see just how photo essays can make you a better photographer and offer you a better “voice” with which to speak to your audience.

Some of these photo essay ideas we’ve already touched on briefly, while others will be completely new to you. 

Cover a Protest or March  

Some of the best photo essay examples come from marches, protests, and other events associated with movements or socio-political statements. Such events allow you to take pictures of angry, happy, or otherwise empowered individuals in high-energy settings. The photo essay narrative can also be further enhanced by arriving early or staying long after the protest has ended to catch contrasting images. 

Photograph a Local Event  

Whether you know it or not, countless unique and interesting events are happening in and around your town this year. Such events provide photographers new opportunities to put together a compelling photo essay. From ethnic festivals to historical events to food and beverage celebrations, there are many different ways to capture and celebrate local life.

Visit an Abandoned Site or Building  

Old homes and historical sites are rich with detail and can sometimes appear dilapidated, overgrown by weeds, or broken down by time. These qualities make them a dynamic and exciting subject. Many great photo essay works of abandoned homes use a mix of far-away shots, close-ups, weird angles, and unique lighting. Such techniques help set a mood that the audience can feel through the photographic essay.

Chronicle a Pregnancy

Few photo essay topics could be more personal than telling the story of a pregnancy. Though this photo essay example can require some preparation and will take a lot of time, the results of a photographic essay like this are usually extremely emotionally-charged and touching. In some cases, photographers will continue the photo essay project as the child grows as well.

Photograph Unique Lifestyles  

People all over the world are embracing society’s changes in different ways. People live in vans or in “tiny houses,” living in the woods miles away from everyone else, and others are growing food on self-sustaining farms. Some of the best photo essay works have been born out of these new, inspiring movements.

Photograph Animals or Pets  

If you have a favorite animal (or one that you know very little about), you might want to arrange a way to see it up close and tell its story through images. You can take photos like this in a zoo or the animal’s natural habitat, depending on the type of animal you choose. Pets are another great topic for a photo essay and are among the most popular subjects for many photographers.

Show Body Positive Themes  

So much of modern photography is about showing the best looking, prettiest, or sexiest people at all times. Choosing a photo essay theme like body positivity, however, allows you to film a wide range of interesting-looking people from all walks of life.

Such a photo essay theme doesn’t just apply to women, as beauty can be found everywhere. As a photo essay photographer, it’s your job to find it!

Bring Social Issues to Life  

Some of the most impactful social photo essay examples are those where the photographer focuses on social issues. From discrimination to domestic violence to the injustices of the prison system, there are many ways that a creative photographer can highlight what’s wrong with the world. This type of photo essay can be incredibly powerful when paired with compelling subjects and some basic text.

Photograph Style and Fashion

If you live in or know of a particularly stylish locale or area, you can put together an excellent thematic photo essay by capturing impromptu shots of well-dressed people as they pass by. As with culture, style is easily identifiable and is as unifying as it is divisive. Great photo essay examples include people who’ve covered fashion sub-genres from all over the world, like urban hip hop or Japanese Visual Kei. 

Photograph Native Cultures and Traditions  

If you’ve ever opened up a copy of National Geographic, you’ve probably seen photo essay photos that fit this category. To many, the traditions, dress, religious ceremonies, and celebrations of native peoples and foreign cultures can be utterly captivating. For travel photographers, this photo essay is considered one of the best ways to tell a story with or without text.

Capture Seasonal Or Time Changes In A Landmark Photo Essay

Time-lapse photography is very compelling to most viewers. What they do in a few hours, however, others are doing over months, years, and even decades. If you know of an exciting landscape or scene, you can try to capture the same image in Winter, Spring, Summer, and Fall, and put that all together into one landmark photo essay.

Alternatively, you can photograph something being lost or ravaged by time or weather. The subject of your landmark photo essay can be as simple as the wall of an old building or as complex as an old house in the woods being taken over by nature. As always, there are countless transformation-based landmark photo essay works from which you can draw inspiration.

Photograph Humanitarian Efforts or Charity  

Humanitarian efforts by groups like Habitat for Humanity, the Red Cross, and Doctors Without Borders can invoke a powerful response through even the simplest of photos. While it can be hard to put yourself in a position to get the images, there are countless photo essay examples to serve as inspiration for your photo essay project.

How to Create a Photo Essay

There is no singular way to create a photo essay. As it is, ultimately, and artistic expression of the photographer, there is no right, wrong, good, or bad. However, like all stories, some tell them well and those who do not. Luckily, as with all things, practice does make perfect. Below, we’ve listed some basic steps outlining how to create a photo essay

Photo essay

Steps To Create A Photo Essay

Choose Your Topic – While some photo essayists will be able to “happen upon” a photo story and turn it into something compelling, most will want to choose their photo essay topics ahead of time. While the genres listed above should provide a great starting place, it’s essential to understand that photo essay topics can cover any event or occasion and any span of time

Do Some Research – The next step to creating a photo essay is to do some basic research. Examples could include learning the history of the area you’re shooting or the background of the person you photograph. If you’re photographing a new event, consider learning the story behind it. Doing so will give you ideas on what to look for when you’re shooting.  

Make a Storyboard – Storyboards are incredibly useful tools when you’re still in the process of deciding what photo story you want to tell. By laying out your ideas shot by shot, or even doing rough illustrations of what you’re trying to capture, you can prepare your photo story before you head out to take your photos.

This process is especially important if you have little to no control over your chosen subject. People who are participating in a march or protest, for instance, aren’t going to wait for you to get in position before offering up the perfect shot. You need to know what you’re looking for and be prepared to get it.

Get the Right Images – If you have a shot list or storyboard, you’ll be well-prepared to take on your photo essay. Make sure you give yourself enough time (where applicable) and take plenty of photos, so you have a lot from which to choose. It would also be a good idea to explore the area, show up early, and stay late. You never know when an idea might strike you.

Assemble Your Story – Once you develop or organize your photos on your computer, you need to choose the pictures that tell the most compelling photo story or stories. You might also find some great images that don’t fit your photo story These can still find a place in your portfolio, however, or perhaps a completely different photo essay you create later.

Depending on the type of photographer you are, you might choose to crop or digitally edit some of your photos to enhance the emotions they invoke. Doing so is completely at your discretion, but worth considering if you feel you can improve upon the naked image.

Ready to take your photography to the next level?

Ready to take your photography to the next level?

Join Cole’s Classroom today! »

Best Photo Essays Tips And Tricks

Before you approach the art of photo essaying for the first time, you might want to consider with these photo essay examples some techniques, tips, and tricks that can make your session more fun and your final results more interesting. Below, we’ve compiled a list of some of the best advice we could find on the subject of photo essays. 

Guy taking a photo

⬥ Experiment All You Want 

You can, and should, plan your topic and your theme with as much attention to detail as possible. That said, some of the best photo essay examples come to us from photographers that got caught up in the moment and decided to experiment in different ways. Ideas for experimentation include the following: 

Angles – Citizen Kane is still revered today for the unique, dramatic angles used in the film. Though that was a motion picture and not photography, the same basic principles still apply. Don’t be afraid to photograph some different angles to see how they bring your subject to life in different ways.

Color – Some images have more gravitas in black in white or sepia tone. You can say the same for images that use color in an engaging, dynamic way. You always have room to experiment with color, both before and after the shoot.

Contrast – Dark and light, happy and sad, rich and poor – contrast is an instantly recognizable form of tension that you can easily include in your photo essay. In some cases, you can plan for dramatic contrasts. In other cases, you simply need to keep your eyes open.

Exposure Settings – You can play with light in terms of exposure as well, setting a number of different moods in the resulting photos. Some photographers even do random double exposures to create a photo essay that’s original.

Filters – There are endless post-production options available to photographers, particularly if they use digital cameras. Using different programs and apps, you can completely alter the look and feel of your image, changing it from warm to cool or altering dozens of different settings.

Want to never run out of natural & authentic poses? You need this ⬇️ 

Click here & get it today for a huge discount., ⬥ take more photos than you need .

If you’re using traditional film instead of a digital camera, you’re going to want to stock up. Getting the right shots for a photo essay usually involves taking hundreds of images that will end up in the rubbish bin. Taking extra pictures you won’t use is just the nature of the photography process. Luckily, there’s nothing better than coming home to realize that you managed to capture that one, perfect photograph. 

⬥ Set the Scene 

You’re not just telling a story to your audience – you’re writing it as well. If the scene you want to capture doesn’t have the look you want, don’t be afraid to move things around until it does. While this doesn’t often apply to photographing events that you have no control over, you shouldn’t be afraid to take a second to make an OK shot a great shot. 

⬥ Capture Now, Edit Later 

Editing, cropping, and digital effects can add a lot of drama and artistic flair to your photos. That said, you shouldn’t waste time on a shoot, thinking about how you can edit it later. Instead, make sure you’re capturing everything that you want and not missing out on any unique pictures. If you need to make changes later, you’ll have plenty of time! 

⬥ Make It Fun 

As photographers, we know that taking pictures is part art, part skill, and part performance. If you want to take the best photo essays, you need to loosen up and have fun. Again, you’ll want to plan for your topic as best as you can, but don’t be afraid to lose yourself in the experience. Once you let yourself relax, both the ideas and the opportunities will manifest.

⬥ It’s All in The Details 

When someone puts out a photographic essay for an audience, that work usually gets analyzed with great attention to detail. You need to apply this same level of scrutiny to the shots you choose to include in your photo essay. If something is out of place or (in the case of historical work) out of time, you can bet the audience will notice.

⬥ Consider Adding Text

While it isn’t necessary, a photographic essay can be more powerful by the addition of text. This is especially true of images with an interesting background story that can’t be conveyed through the image alone. If you don’t feel up to the task of writing content, consider partnering with another artist and allowing them tor bring your work to life.

Final Thoughts 

The world is waiting to tell us story after story. Through the best photo essays, we can capture the elements of those stories and create a photo essay that can invoke a variety of emotions in our audience.

No matter the type of cameras we choose, the techniques we embrace, or the topics we select, what really matters is that the photos say something about the people, objects, and events that make our world wonderful.

Dream of Being a Pro Photographer?

Join Cole’s Classroom today to make it a reality.

Similar Posts

11 Reasons to Send a Style Guide on Coordinating Outfits for Family Pictures!

11 Reasons to Send a Style Guide on Coordinating Outfits for Family Pictures!

Could sending a style guide be the answer to improving your portrait photography? Do you wish your family photos looked more polished and editorial? I think the answer to this is yes! This is exactly how a guide can help! We so often get caught up in the bigger picture that we sometimes forget to…

Personal Branding Photography Basics [Complete Guide]

Personal Branding Photography Basics [Complete Guide]

Help other entrepreneurs build their business with personal branding photography Personal branding photography is one of the fastest growing niches around.  Entrepreneurs and small business owners recognize the value of high-quality photography in their own marketing efforts.  Your skills can help others and both of you can achieve your business goals! What is personal branding…

Portrait Camera Settings: Getting Great Shots Consistently [2020 Update]

Portrait Camera Settings: Getting Great Shots Consistently [2020 Update]

Ever panic on a portrait session because you’re unsure as to your camera settings? Relax! Here are some easy tips for your portrait camera settings! So I think we’ve all been there. You arrive at a portrait location, and things are not “business as usual.” Maybe you’re behind on time, the light is not what you…

Outdoor Photography Ethics: When getting likes causes harm

Outdoor Photography Ethics: When getting likes causes harm

Help contribute to the industry and the environment and practice good photography ethics. How much is a social media like worth to you?  Is it worth a trespass fine?  The destruction of private property?  The loss of someone else’s income?  The life of an animal?  The lives of your friends and neighbors caught in a…

Benefits of Beautiful Blurry Backgrounds: Bokeh for Beginners

Benefits of Beautiful Blurry Backgrounds: Bokeh for Beginners

What is bokeh, and how do you get it? You’ve heard photographers throwing that term around like everyone knows what it is, but you’re left in the dark trying to understand it. Not to worry, bokeh isn’t so mysterious once someone explains what it means which is what we’re here for. We’ll also let you…

Beyond the Snapshot: How to Meaningfully Photograph Birthday Parties

Beyond the Snapshot: How to Meaningfully Photograph Birthday Parties

My love for photos started long before I ever even owned a DSLR camera. I have always been a “memory keeper” of sorts, documenting special moments in pictures, and reveling in the memories long after the moment was gone. Now that I’m “a photographer,” I spend much of my time perfecting my craft as it…

  • Grades 6-12
  • School Leaders

Black History Month for Kids: Google Slides, Resources, and More!

Teaching the Photo Essay

A picture is worth 1,000 words.

photo essay example for grade 6

Your students, if they’re anything like mine, love to communicate through images—photos on Instagram , GIFs shared in a text, photo stories on Snapchat. And yet, so much of our conversation in school revolves around words. Understanding text is critical to students’ success now and in the future. But do we also help students identify, read and understand images in order to become literate in the visual language that is all around us? The photo essay can be a great middle or high school assignment that will have strong appeal and grow your students’ writing skills.

What Is a Photo Essay?

For those who aren’t familiar with the term “photo essay,” have no fear. A photo essay, in its simplest form, is a series of pictures that evokes an emotion, presents an idea or helps tell a story. You’ve been exposed to photo essays for your entire life—possibly without even knowing it. For example, you may have seen Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother:

teachingphotoessay

An iconic image of the Great Depression, this picture, along with Lange’s other gripping photos, helped Americans better understand the effects of poverty in California as well as across the nation. Migrant Mother is one of countless photographs that helped persuade, influence or engage viewers in ways that text alone could not.

Photo essays can feature text through articles and descriptions, or they can stand alone with simple captions to give context. The versatility of photo essays has helped the medium become a part of our culture for centuries, from the American Civil War to modern environmental disasters like the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. This versatility is also what makes the photo essay a great educational asset in classrooms today; teachers can use them in any content area. Math students can use them to show a geometric concept in real life. Science students can document a chemistry process at home. Auto students can photograph the technique—and joys and frustrations—of learning a new procedure.

So, where does a teacher begin? Read further for tips and ideas for making photo essays a part of your teaching toolbox.

Start With Photos

Introducing photo essays as a means of changing lives and changing society can hook student interest in the medium. Begin by simply showing pictures and letting students discuss their reactions. Consider this famous photo of the field at Antietam during the Civil War. Share some of the photos from this collection from CNN of 25 of the Most Iconic Photograph s or this list of 50 Influential Photographs That Changed Our World .

Each of these photographs stirs emotion and sends our minds searching for answers. As a warm-up assignment or series of assignments, have students choose (or assign randomly) a photograph to write about. What’s the story? Why did this happen? Who was involved?

DIY Photographs

Before giving a formal photo essay assignment, give students an opportunity to practice and receive feedback. Consider presenting students with several open-ended, ungraded challenges like “For class tomorrow, take a photo that depicts ‘Struggle.’” Other possible photo topics: chaos, frustration, friendship, school. Have students email you their photo homework and share it as a slideshow. Talk about the images. Do they convey the theme?

You can give examples or suggestions; however, giving too many examples and requirements can narrow students’ creativity. The purpose of this trial run is to generate conversation and introduce students to thinking like photographers, so don’t worry if the photos aren’t what you had in mind; it’s about getting feedback on what the student had in mind.

Technique 101

Even though the goal of a photo essay is to influence and create discussion, there is still benefit in giving students a crash course on simple photography concepts. Don’t feel like you have to teach a master-level course on dark-room development. Even a simple overview on the “Rule of Thirds” and the importance of perspective can be enough to help students create intentional, visually stirring photographs.

You can teach these ideas directly or have students do the work by researching on their own. They have most likely seen hundreds of movies, advertisements and photos, so these lessons are simply labeling what they’ve already experienced. Having some knowledge of composition will not only help students improve their visual literacy, it will also help empower them to take photos of their own.

Choose Your Purpose

Are students telling their own stories of their neighborhoods or their families? Are they addressing a social issue or making an argument through their images and text? A photo essay could be a great assignment in science to document a process or focus on nature.

If you are just getting started, start out small: Have students create a short photo essay (two to five images) to present a topic, process or idea you have been focusing on in class. Here’s a Photo Essay Planning Guide to share with your students.

Photo Essay Planning Guide Image

With pictures becoming a dominant medium in our image-filled world, it’s not a question of if we should give students practice and feedback with visual literacy, it’s a question of how . Photo essays are a simple, engaging way to start. So, what’s your plan?

You Might Also Like

Collage of ideas for using Flip in the classroom, including a grading rubric and green screen tent

What Is Flip (Formerly Flipgrid)? 60 Ways To Engage Students

The video app you'll flip for! Continue Reading

Copyright © 2023. All rights reserved. 5335 Gate Parkway, Jacksonville, FL 32256

Jump to navigation

  • Inside Writing
  • Teacher's Guides
  • Student Models
  • Writing Topics
  • Minilessons
  • Shopping Cart
  • Inside Grammar
  • Grammar Adventures
  • CCSS Correlations
  • Infographics

Get a free Grammar Adventure! Choose a single Adventure and add coupon code ADVENTURE during checkout. (All-Adventure licenses aren’t included.)

Sign up or login to use the bookmarking feature.

  • 33 Writing Photo Essays

Writing Photo Essays

Start-Up Activity

Share appropriate magazines that include photos and text, such as National Geographic or Life . Have students page through the magazines, looking for photos that draw their attention. Ask what they like about the photos. Ask what they can learn from the photos. Ask them to close their eyes and imagine the magazine with no photos, just words.

Lead a discussion about the power of pictures. Help students understand that when they connect words and photos, they can reach their audience in all new ways.

Think About It

“We try to grab pieces of our lives as they speed past us. Photographs freeze those pieces and help us remember how we were.”

—Gene McSweeney

State Standards Covered in This Chapter

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.6.1
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.6.2
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.6.3
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.6.7
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.2
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.2.A
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.2.B
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.4
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.5
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.7
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.2.C
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.2.D
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.2.E
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.2.F
  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.6.6

LAFS Covered in This Chapter

Lafs.6.ri.1.1, lafs.6.ri.1.2, lafs.6.ri.1.3, lafs.6.ri.3.7, lafs.6.w.1.2, lafs.6.w.2.4, lafs.6.w.2.5, lafs.6.w.3.7, lafs.6.w.2.6, teks covered in this chapter, 110.22.b.5.f, 110.22.b.8.d, 110.22.b.8.d.i, 110.22.b.6.d, 110.22.b.8.d.iii, 110.22.b.8.f, 110.22.b.10, 110.22.b.11.b, 110.22.b.10.a, 110.22.b.10.b.i, 110.22.b.10.b.ii, 110.22.b.10.b, 110.22.b.10.c, 110.22.b.10.d, 110.22.b.12, 110.22.b.10.e, page 171 from write on track, sample photo essay.

Have volunteers read each paragraph of the sample photo essay. When a photo accompanies a paragraph, stop to discuss the photo. "How does the photo make the ideas clearer?" "What is the photo doing that the text can't do?" Point out to students that each photo must be carefully chosen and positioned, just as the words are carefully chosen and positioned.

Related Resource Tags

Click to view a list of tags that tie into other resources on our site

Page 172 from Write on Track

Ask for a student volunteer to read the paragraph in the middle of the photo essay.

Then ask for other volunteers to describe "what the photo shows you." Help students understand that they can learn a great deal from a photo.

Page 173 from Write on Track

Have a volunteer read the paragraph. Then lead a discussion about what they see. Ask students what the photos are doing that words alone can't do.

Then have a volunteer read the last part of the essay.

Page 174 from Write on Track

Writing a photo essay.

Have your students list interesting people they know who have jobs or hobbies that other students would like to find out about. Students then should pick a topic.

Lead students through the next two sets of tips, having them research their topics and collect photos. If they know the person, they may want to interview him or her and take pictures. If they don't know the person, they may need to do research in books and online.

At the bottom of the page, remind students that the photos they include shouldn't just be "for show." They should communicate ideas that words can't express.

Page 175 from Write on Track

Writing, revising, and editing.

After students have gathered information and images for their photo essays, lead them through "Writing a Draft." Then give them time to put their first drafts together.

When the time comes to revise, have students use the questions under "Revising" to improve their work. Also, have peer readers use these questions to suggest improvements.

After revising, have students check for spelling, capitalization, and punctuation errors.

  • 01 Understanding Writing
  • 02 One Writer's Process
  • 03 Qualities of Writing
  • 04 Selecting a Topic
  • 05 Collecting Details
  • 06 Writing a First Draft
  • 07 Revising and Editing
  • 08 Publishing Your Writing
  • 09 Writing Basic Sentences
  • 10 Combining Sentences
  • 11 Writing Paragraphs
  • 12 Understanding Text Structures
  • 13 Writing in Journals and Logs
  • 14 Writing Lists
  • 15 Making Albums
  • 16 Writing Notes and Emails
  • 17 Writing Friendly Letters
  • 18 Writing Personal Narratives
  • 19 Writing Family Stories
  • 20 Writing Realistic Stories
  • 21 Writing Time-Travel Fantasies
  • 22 Writing Tall Tales
  • 23 Writing Alphabet Books
  • 24 How-To Writing
  • 25 Writing Information Essays
  • 26 Writing Newspaper Stories
  • 27 Writing Persuasive Essays
  • 28 Writing Opinion Letters
  • 29 Writing Book Reviews
  • 30 Making Bookmarks
  • 31 Writing Classroom Reports
  • 32 Writing Summaries
  • 34 Writing Free-Verse Poetry
  • 35 Traditional and Playful Poetry
  • 36 Writing Plays
  • 37 Using the Library
  • 38 Using Technology
  • 39 Reading to Understand Fiction
  • 40 Reading to Understand Nonfiction
  • 41 Reading Graphics
  • 42 Reading New Words
  • 43 Building Vocabulary Skills
  • 44 Using Prefixes, Suffixes, Roots
  • 45 Becoming a Better Speller
  • 46 Learning to View
  • 47 Giving Speeches
  • 48 Performing Poems
  • 49 Telling Stories
  • 50 Learning to Interview
  • 51 Listening to Learn
  • 52 Using Graphic Organizers
  • 53 Thinking Clearly
  • 54 Thinking Creatively
  • 55 Completing Assignments
  • 56 Working in Groups
  • 57 Taking Tests
  • 58 Proofreader's Guide
  • 59 Student Almanac
  • Share your Views
  • Submit a Contest
  • Recommend Contest
  • Terms of Service
  • Testimonials

Photo Contest Insider

Photo Contests – Photography competitions

  • Filter Photo Contests
  • All Photo Contests
  • Get FREE Contests Updates
  • Photo Contest Tips
  • Photography Deals

photo essay example for grade 6

What is a Photo Essay? 9 Photo Essay Examples You Can Recreate

A photo essay is a series of photographs that tell a story. Unlike a written essay, a photo essay focuses on visuals instead of words. With a photo essay, you can stretch your creative limits and explore new ways to connect with your audience. Whatever your photography skill level, you can recreate your own fun and creative photo essay.

9 Photo Essay Examples You Can Recreate

  • Photowalk Photo Essay
  • Transformation Photo Essay
  • Day in the Life Photo Essay
  • Event Photo Essay
  • Building Photo Essay
  • Historic Site or Landmark Photo Essay
  • Behind the Scenes Photo Essay
  • Family Photo Essay
  • Education Photo Essay

Stories are important to all of us. While some people gravitate to written stories, others are much more attuned to visual imagery. With a photo essay, you can tell a story without writing a word. Your use of composition, contrast, color, and perspective in photography will convey ideas and evoke emotions.

To explore narrative photography, you can use basic photographic equipment. You can buy a camera or even use your smartphone to get started. While lighting, lenses, and post-processing software can enhance your photos, they aren’t necessary to achieve good results.

Whether you need to complete a photo essay assignment or want to pursue one for fun or professional purposes, you can use these photo essay ideas for your photography inspiration . Once you know the answer to “what is a photo essay?” and find out how fun it is to create one, you’ll likely be motivated to continue your forays into photographic storytelling.

1 . Photowalk Photo Essay

One popular photo essay example is a photowalk. Simply put, a photowalk is time you set aside to walk around a city, town, or a natural site and take photos. Some cities even have photowalk tours led by professional photographers. On these tours, you can learn the basics about how to operate your camera, practice photography composition techniques, and understand how to look for unique shots that help tell your story.

Set aside at least two to three hours for your photowalk. Even if you’re photographing a familiar place—like your own home town—try to look at it through new eyes. Imagine yourself as a first-time visitor or pretend you’re trying to educate a tourist about the area.

Walk around slowly and look for different ways to capture the mood and energy of your location. If you’re in a city, capture wide shots of streets, close-ups of interesting features on buildings, street signs, and candid shots of people. Look for small details that give the city character and life. And try some new concepts—like reflection picture ideas—by looking for opportunities to photographs reflections in mirrored buildings, puddles, fountains, or bodies of water.

2 . Transformation Photo Essay

With a transformation photography essay, you can tell the story about change over time. One of the most popular photostory examples, a transformation essay can document a mom-to-be’s pregnancy or a child’s growth from infancy into the toddler years. But people don’t need to be the focus of a transformation essay. You can take photos of a house that is being built or an urban area undergoing revitalization.

You can also create a photo narrative to document a short-term change. Maybe you want to capture images of your growing garden or your move from one home to another. These examples of photo essays are powerful ways of telling the story of life’s changes—both large and small.

3 . Day in the Life Photo Essay

Want a unique way to tell a person’s story? Or, perhaps you want to introduce people to a career or activity. You may want to consider a day in the life essay.

With this photostory example, your narrative focuses on a specific subject for an entire day. For example, if you are photographing a farmer, you’ll want to arrive early in the morning and shadow the farmer as he or she performs daily tasks. Capture a mix of candid shots of the farmer at work and add landscapes and still life of equipment for added context. And if you are at a farm, don’t forget to get a few shots of the animals for added character, charm, or even a dose of humor. These types of photography essay examples are great practice if you are considering pursuing photojournalism. They also help you learn and improve your candid portrait skills.

4 . Event Photo Essay

Events are happening in your local area all the time, and they can make great photo essays. With a little research, you can quickly find many events that you could photograph. There may be bake sales, fundraisers, concerts, art shows, farm markets, block parties, and other non profit event ideas . You could also focus on a personal event, such as a birthday or graduation.

At most events, your primary emphasis will be on capturing candid photos of people in action. You can also capture backgrounds or objects to set the scene. For example, at a birthday party, you’ll want to take photos of the cake and presents.

For a local or community event, you can share your photos with the event organizer. Or, you may be able to post them on social media and tag the event sponsor. This is a great way to gain recognition and build your reputation as a talented photographer.

5. Building Photo Essay

Many buildings can be a compelling subject for a photographic essay. Always make sure that you have permission to enter and photograph the building. Once you do, look for interesting shots and angles that convey the personality, purpose, and history of the building. You may also be able to photograph the comings and goings of people that visit or work in the building during the day.

Some photographers love to explore and photograph abandoned buildings. With these types of photos, you can provide a window into the past. Definitely make sure you gain permission before entering an abandoned building and take caution since some can have unsafe elements and structures.

6. Historic Site or Landmark Photo Essay

Taking a series of photos of a historic site or landmark can be a great experience. You can learn to capture the same site from different angles to help portray its character and tell its story. And you can also photograph how people visit and engage with the site or landmark. Take photos at different times of day and in varied lighting to capture all its nuances and moods.

You can also use your photographic essay to help your audience understand the history of your chosen location. For example, if you want to provide perspective on the Civil War, a visit to a battleground can be meaningful. You can also visit a site when reenactors are present to share insight on how life used to be in days gone by.

7 . Behind the Scenes Photo Essay

Another fun essay idea is taking photos “behind the scenes” at an event. Maybe you can chronicle all the work that goes into a holiday festival from the early morning set-up to the late-night teardown. Think of the lead event planner as the main character of your story and build the story about him or her.

Or, you can go backstage at a drama production. Capture photos of actors and actresses as they transform their looks with costuming and makeup. Show the lead nervously pacing in the wings before taking center stage. Focus the work of stagehands, lighting designers, and makeup artists who never see the spotlight but bring a vital role in bringing the play to life.

8. Family Photo Essay

If you enjoy photographing people, why not explore photo story ideas about families and relationships? You can focus on interactions between two family members—such as a father and a daughter—or convey a message about a family as a whole.

Sometimes these type of photo essays can be all about the fun and joy of living in a close-knit family. But sometimes they can be powerful portraits of challenging social topics. Images of a family from another country can be a meaningful photo essay on immigration. You could also create a photo essay on depression by capturing families who are coping with one member’s illness.

For these projects on difficult topics, you may want to compose a photo essay with captions. These captions can feature quotes from family members or document your own observations. Although approaching hard topics isn’t easy, these types of photos can have lasting impact and value.

9. Education Photo Essay

Opportunities for education photo essays are everywhere—from small preschools to community colleges and universities. You can seek permission to take photos at public or private schools or even focus on alternative educational paths, like homeschooling.

Your education photo essay can take many forms. For example, you can design a photo essay of an experienced teacher at a high school. Take photos of him or her in action in the classroom, show quiet moments grading papers, and capture a shared laugh between colleagues in the teacher’s lounge.

Alternatively, you can focus on a specific subject—such as science and technology. Or aim to portray a specific grade level, document activities club or sport, or portray the social environment. A photo essay on food choices in the cafeteria can be thought-provoking or even funny. There are many potential directions to pursue and many great essay examples.

While education is an excellent topic for a photo essay for students, education can be a great source of inspiration for any photographer.

Why Should You Create a Photo Essay?

Ultimately, photographers are storytellers. Think of what a photographer does during a typical photo shoot. He or she will take a series of photos that helps convey the essence of the subject—whether that is a person, location, or inanimate object. For example, a family portrait session tells the story of a family—who they are, their personalities, and the closeness of their relationship.

Learning how to make a photo essay can help you become a better storyteller—and a better photographer. You’ll cultivate key photography skills that you can carry with you no matter where your photography journey leads.

If you simply want to document life’s moments on social media, you may find that a single picture doesn’t always tell the full story. Reviewing photo essay examples and experimenting with your own essay ideas can help you choose meaningful collections of photos to share with friends and family online.

Learning how to create photo essays can also help you work towards professional photography ambitions. You’ll often find that bloggers tell photographic stories. For example, think of cooking blogs that show you each step in making a recipe. Photo essays are also a mainstay of journalism. You’ll often find photo essays examples in many media outlets—everywhere from national magazines to local community newspapers. And the best travel photographers on Instagram tell great stories with their photos, too.

With a photo essay, you can explore many moods and emotions. Some of the best photo essays tell serious stories, but some are humorous, and others aim to evoke action.

You can raise awareness with a photo essay on racism or a photo essay on poverty. A photo essay on bullying can help change the social climate for students at a school. Or, you can document a fun day at the beach or an amusement park. You have control of the themes, photographic elements, and the story you want to tell.

5 Steps to Create a Photo Essay

Every photo essay will be different, but you can use a standard process. Following these five steps will guide you through every phase of your photo essay project—from brainstorming creative essay topics to creating a photo essay to share with others.

Step 1: Choose Your Photo Essay Topics

Just about any topic you can imagine can form the foundation for a photo essay. You may choose to focus on a specific event, such as a wedding, performance, or festival. Or you may want to cover a topic over a set span of time, such as documenting a child’s first year. You could also focus on a city or natural area across the seasons to tell a story of changing activities or landscapes.

Since the best photo essays convey meaning and emotion, choose a topic of interest. Your passion for the subject matter will shine through each photograph and touch your viewer’s hearts and minds.

Step 2: Conduct Upfront Research

Much of the work in a good-quality photo essay begins before you take your first photo. It’s always a good idea to do some research on your planned topic.

Imagine you’re going to take photos of a downtown area throughout the year. You should spend some time learning the history of the area. Talk with local residents and business owners and find out about planned events. With these insights, you’ll be able to plan ahead and be prepared to take photos that reflect the area’s unique personality and lifestyles.

For any topic you choose, gather information first. This may involve internet searches, library research, interviews, or spending time observing your subject.

Step 3: Storyboard Your Ideas

After you have done some research and have a good sense of the story you want to tell, you can create a storyboard. With a storyboard, you can write or sketch out the ideal pictures you want to capture to convey your message.

You can turn your storyboard into a “shot list” that you can bring with you on site. A shot list can be especially helpful when you are at a one-time event and want to capture specific shots for your photo essay. If you’ve never created a photo essay before, start with ten shot ideas. Think of each shot as a sentence in your story. And aim to make each shot evoke specific ideas or emotions.

Step 4: Capture Images

Your storyboard and shot list will be important guides to help you make the most of each shoot. Be sure to set aside enough time to capture all the shots you need—especially if you are photographing a one-time event. And allow yourself to explore your ideas using different photography composition, perspective, and color contrast techniques.

You may need to take a hundred images or more to get ten perfect ones for your photographic essay. Or, you may find that you want to add more photos to your story and expand your picture essay concept.

Also, remember to look for special unplanned, moments that help tell your story. Sometimes, spontaneous photos that aren’t on your shot list can be full of meaning. A mix of planning and flexibility almost always yields the best results.

Step 5: Edit and Organize Photos to Tell Your Story

After capturing your images, you can work on compiling your photo story. To create your photo essay, you will need to make decisions about which images portray your themes and messages. At times, this can mean setting aside beautiful images that aren’t a perfect fit. You can use your shot list and storyboard as a guide but be open to including photos that weren’t in your original plans.

You may want to use photo editing software—such as Adobe Lightroom or Photoshop— to enhance and change photographs. With these tools, you can adjust lighting and white balance, perform color corrections, crop, or perform other edits. If you have a signature photo editing style, you may want to use Photoshop Actions or Lightroom Presets to give all your photos a consistent look and feel.

You order a photo book from one of the best photo printing websites to publish your photo story. You can add them to an album on a photo sharing site, such as Flickr or Google Photos. Also, you could focus on building a website dedicated to documenting your concepts through visual photo essays. If so, you may want to use SEO for photographers to improve your website’s ranking in search engine results. You could even publish your photo essay on social media. Another thing to consider is whether you want to include text captures or simply tell your story through photographs.

Choose the medium that feels like the best space to share your photo essay ideas and vision with your audiences. You should think of your photo essay as your own personal form of art and expression when deciding where and how to publish it.

Photo Essays Can Help You Become a Better Photographer

Whatever your photography ambitions may be, learning to take a photo essay can help you grow. Even simple essay topics can help you gain skills and stretch your photographic limits. With a photo essay, you start to think about how a series of photographs work together to tell a complete story. You’ll consider how different shots work together, explore options for perspective and composition, and change the way you look at the world.

Before you start taking photos, you should review photo essay examples. You can find interesting pictures to analyze and photo story examples online, in books, or in classic publications, like Life Magazine . Don’t forget to look at news websites for photojournalism examples to broaden your perspective. This review process will help you in brainstorming simple essay topics for your first photo story and give you ideas for the future as well.

Ideas and inspiration for photo essay topics are everywhere. You can visit a park or go out into your own backyard to pursue a photo essay on nature. Or, you can focus on the day in the life of someone you admire with a photo essay of a teacher, fireman, or community leader. Buildings, events, families, and landmarks are all great subjects for concept essay topics. If you are feeling stuck coming up with ideas for essays, just set aside a few hours to walk around your city or town and take photos. This type of photowalk can be a great source of material.

You’ll soon find that advanced planning is critical to your success. Brainstorming topics, conducting research, creating a storyboard, and outlining a shot list can help ensure you capture the photos you need to tell your story. After you’ve finished shooting, you’ll need to decide where to house your photo essay. You may need to come up with photo album title ideas, write captions, and choose the best medium and layout.

Without question, creating a photo essay can be a valuable experience for any photographer. That’s true whether you’re an amateur completing a high school assignment or a pro looking to hone new skills. You can start small with an essay on a subject you know well and then move into conquering difficult ideas. Maybe you’ll want to create a photo essay on mental illness or a photo essay on climate change. Or maybe there’s another cause that is close to your heart.

Whatever your passion, you can bring it to life with a photo essay.

JOIN OVER 83,103 and receive weekly updates!

Comments are closed.

Nikon Competition

Photo Contest Insider

The world’s largest collection of photo contests.

Photo contests are manually reviewed by our team to ensure only the very best make it on to our website. It’s our policy to only list photo contests that are fair.

Photo Contest Insider

Subscription

Register now to get updates on promotions and offers

DISCLAIMER:

  • Photo Contest Filter
  • Get FREE Contest Updates

Photo Contest Insider © 2009 - 2024

Advertise Submit Badges Help Terms Privacy Unsubscribe Do Not Sell My Information

shotkitlogo

The leading authority in photography and camera gear.

Become a better photographer.

12.9 Million

Annual Readers

Newsletter Subscribers

Featured Photographers

Photography Guides & Gear Reviews

The New York Times

How to Create an Engaging Photo Essay (with Examples)

Photo essays tell a story in pictures. They're a great way to improve at photography and story-telling skills at once. Learn how to do create a great one.

Learn | Photography Guides | By Ana Mireles

Photography is a medium used to tell stories – sometimes they are told in one picture, sometimes you need a whole series. Those series can be photo essays.

If you’ve never done a photo essay before, or you’re simply struggling to find your next project, this article will be of help. I’ll be showing you what a photo essay is and how to go about doing one.

You’ll also find plenty of photo essay ideas and some famous photo essay examples from recent times that will serve you as inspiration.

If you’re ready to get started, let’s jump right in!

Table of Contents

What is a Photo Essay?

A photo essay is a series of images that share an overarching theme as well as a visual and technical coherence to tell a story. Some people refer to a photo essay as a photo series or a photo story – this often happens in photography competitions.

Photographic history is full of famous photo essays. Think about The Great Depression by Dorothea Lange, Like Brother Like Sister by Wolfgang Tillmans, Gandhi’s funeral by Henri Cartier Bresson, amongst others.

What are the types of photo essay?

Despite popular belief, the type of photo essay doesn’t depend on the type of photography that you do – in other words, journalism, documentary, fine art, or any other photographic genre is not a type of photo essay.

Instead, there are two main types of photo essays: narrative and thematic .

As you have probably already guessed, the thematic one presents images pulled together by a topic – for example, global warming. The images can be about animals and nature as well as natural disasters devastating cities. They can happen all over the world or in the same location, and they can be captured in different moments in time – there’s a lot of flexibility.

A narrative photo essa y, on the other hand, tells the story of a character (human or not), portraying a place or an event. For example, a narrative photo essay on coffee would document the process from the planting and harvesting – to the roasting and grinding until it reaches your morning cup.

What are some of the key elements of a photo essay?

  • Tell a unique story – A unique story doesn’t mean that you have to photograph something that nobody has done before – that would be almost impossible! It means that you should consider what you’re bringing to the table on a particular topic.
  • Put yourself into the work – One of the best ways to make a compelling photo essay is by adding your point of view, which can only be done with your life experiences and the way you see the world.
  • Add depth to the concept – The best photo essays are the ones that go past the obvious and dig deeper in the story, going behind the scenes, or examining a day in the life of the subject matter – that’s what pulls in the spectator.
  • Nail the technique – Even if the concept and the story are the most important part of a photo essay, it won’t have the same success if it’s poorly executed.
  • Build a structure – A photo essay is about telling a thought-provoking story – so, think about it in a narrative way. Which images are going to introduce the topic? Which ones represent a climax? How is it going to end – how do you want the viewer to feel after seeing your photo series?
  • Make strong choices – If you really want to convey an emotion and a unique point of view, you’re going to need to make some hard decisions. Which light are you using? Which lens? How many images will there be in the series? etc., and most importantly for a great photo essay is the why behind those choices.

9 Tips for Creating a Photo Essay

photo essay example for grade 6

Credit: Laura James

1. Choose something you know

To make a good photo essay, you don’t need to travel to an exotic location or document a civil war – I mean, it’s great if you can, but you can start close to home.

Depending on the type of photography you do and the topic you’re looking for in your photographic essay, you can photograph a local event or visit an abandoned building outside your town.

It will be much easier for you to find a unique perspective and tell a better story if you’re already familiar with the subject. Also, consider that you might have to return a few times to the same location to get all the photos you need.

2. Follow your passion

Most photo essays take dedication and passion. If you choose a subject that might be easy, but you’re not really into it – the results won’t be as exciting. Taking photos will always be easier and more fun if you’re covering something you’re passionate about.

3. Take your time

A great photo essay is not done in a few hours. You need to put in the time to research it, conceptualizing it, editing, etc. That’s why I previously recommended following your passion because it takes a lot of dedication, and if you’re not passionate about it – it’s difficult to push through.

4. Write a summary or statement

Photo essays are always accompanied by some text. You can do this in the form of an introduction, write captions for each photo or write it as a conclusion. That’s up to you and how you want to present the work.

5. Learn from the masters

How Much Do You REALLY Know About Photography?! 🤔

Test your photography knowledge with this quick quiz!

See how much you really know about photography...

photo essay example for grade 6

Your answer:

Correct answer:

SHARE YOUR RESULTS

Your Answers

Making a photographic essay takes a lot of practice and knowledge. A great way to become a better photographer and improve your storytelling skills is by studying the work of others. You can go to art shows, review books and magazines and look at the winners in photo contests – most of the time, there’s a category for photo series.

6. Get a wide variety of photos

Think about a story – a literary one. It usually tells you where the story is happening, who is the main character, and it gives you a few details to make you engage with it, right?

The same thing happens with a visual story in a photo essay – you can do some wide-angle shots to establish the scenes and some close-ups to show the details. Make a shot list to ensure you cover all the different angles.

Some of your pictures should guide the viewer in, while others are more climatic and regard the experience they are taking out of your photos.

7. Follow a consistent look

Both in style and aesthetics, all the images in your series need to be coherent. You can achieve this in different ways, from the choice of lighting, the mood, the post-processing, etc.

8. Be self-critical

Once you have all the photos, make sure you edit them with a good dose of self-criticism. Not all the pictures that you took belong in the photo essay. Choose only the best ones and make sure they tell the full story.

9. Ask for constructive feedback

Often, when we’re working on a photo essay project for a long time, everything makes perfect sense in our heads. However, someone outside the project might not be getting the idea. It’s important that you get honest and constructive criticism to improve your photography.

How to Create a Photo Essay in 5 Steps

photo essay example for grade 6

Credit: Quang Nguyen Vinh

1. Choose your topic

This is the first step that you need to take to decide if your photo essay is going to be narrative or thematic. Then, choose what is it going to be about?

Ideally, it should be something that you’re interested in, that you have something to say about it, and it can connect with other people.

2. Research your topic

To tell a good story about something, you need to be familiar with that something. This is especially true when you want to go deeper and make a compelling photo essay. Day in the life photo essays are a popular choice, since often, these can be performed with friends and family, whom you already should know well.

3. Plan your photoshoot

Depending on what you’re photographing, this step can be very different from one project to the next. For a fine art project, you might need to find a location, props, models, a shot list, etc., while a documentary photo essay is about planning the best time to do the photos, what gear to bring with you, finding a local guide, etc.

Every photo essay will need different planning, so before taking pictures, put in the required time to get things right.

4. Experiment

It’s one thing to plan your photo shoot and having a shot list that you have to get, or else the photo essay won’t be complete. It’s another thing to miss out on some amazing photo opportunities that you couldn’t foresee.

So, be prepared but also stay open-minded and experiment with different settings, different perspectives, etc.

5. Make a final selection

Editing your work can be one of the hardest parts of doing a photo essay. Sometimes we can be overly critical, and others, we get attached to bad photos because we put a lot of effort into them or we had a great time doing them.

Try to be as objective as possible, don’t be afraid to ask for opinions and make various revisions before settling down on a final cut.

7 Photo Essay Topics, Ideas & Examples

photo essay example for grade 6

Credit: Michelle Leman

  • Architectural photo essay

Using architecture as your main subject, there are tons of photo essay ideas that you can do. For some inspiration, you can check out the work of Francisco Marin – who was trained as an architect and then turned to photography to “explore a different way to perceive things”.

You can also lookup Luisa Lambri. Amongst her series, you’ll find many photo essay examples in which architecture is the subject she uses to explore the relationship between photography and space.

  • Process and transformation photo essay

This is one of the best photo essay topics for beginners because the story tells itself. Pick something that has a beginning and an end, for example, pregnancy, the metamorphosis of a butterfly, the life-cycle of a plant, etc.

Keep in mind that these topics are linear and give you an easy way into the narrative flow – however, it might be difficult to find an interesting perspective and a unique point of view.

  • A day in the life of ‘X’ photo essay

There are tons of interesting photo essay ideas in this category – you can follow around a celebrity, a worker, your child, etc. You don’t even have to do it about a human subject – think about doing a photo essay about a day in the life of a racing horse, for example – find something that’s interesting for you.

  • Time passing by photo essay

It can be a natural site or a landmark photo essay – whatever is close to you will work best as you’ll need to come back multiple times to capture time passing by. For example, how this place changes throughout the seasons or maybe even over the years.

A fun option if you live with family is to document a birthday party each year, seeing how the subject changes over time. This can be combined with a transformation essay or sorts, documenting the changes in interpersonal relationships over time.

  • Travel photo essay

Do you want to make the jump from tourist snapshots into a travel photo essay? Research the place you’re going to be travelling to. Then, choose a topic.

If you’re having trouble with how to do this, check out any travel magazine – National Geographic, for example. They won’t do a generic article about Texas – they do an article about the beach life on the Texas Gulf Coast and another one about the diverse flavors of Texas.

The more specific you get, the deeper you can go with the story.

  • Socio-political issues photo essay

This is one of the most popular photo essay examples – it falls under the category of photojournalism or documental photography. They are usually thematic, although it’s also possible to do a narrative one.

Depending on your topic of interest, you can choose topics that involve nature – for example, document the effects of global warming. Another idea is to photograph protests or make an education photo essay.

It doesn’t have to be a big global issue; you can choose something specific to your community – are there too many stray dogs? Make a photo essay about a local animal shelter. The topics are endless.

  • Behind the scenes photo essay

A behind-the-scenes always make for a good photo story – people are curious to know what happens and how everything comes together before a show.

Depending on your own interests, this can be a photo essay about a fashion show, a theatre play, a concert, and so on. You’ll probably need to get some permissions, though, not only to shoot but also to showcase or publish those images.

4 Best Photo Essays in Recent times

Now that you know all the techniques about it, it might be helpful to look at some photo essay examples to see how you can put the concept into practice. Here are some famous photo essays from recent times to give you some inspiration.

Habibi by Antonio Faccilongo

This photo essay wan the World Press Photo Story of the Year in 2021. Faccilongo explores a very big conflict from a very specific and intimate point of view – how the Israeli-Palestinian war affects the families.

He chose to use a square format because it allows him to give order to things and eliminate unnecessary elements in his pictures.

With this long-term photo essay, he wanted to highlight the sense of absence and melancholy women and families feel towards their husbands away at war.

The project then became a book edited by Sarah Leen and the graphics of Ramon Pez.

photo essay example for grade 6

Picture This: New Orleans by Mary Ellen Mark

The last assignment before her passing, Mary Ellen Mark travelled to New Orleans to register the city after a decade after Hurricane Katrina.

The images of the project “bring to life the rebirth and resilience of the people at the heart of this tale”, – says CNNMoney, commissioner of the work.

Each survivor of the hurricane has a story, and Mary Ellen Mark was there to record it. Some of them have heartbreaking stories about everything they had to leave behind.

Others have a story of hope – like Sam and Ben, two eight-year-olds born from frozen embryos kept in a hospital that lost power supply during the hurricane, yet they managed to survive.

photo essay example for grade 6

Selfie by Cindy Sherman

Cindy Sherman is an American photographer whose work is mainly done through self-portraits. With them, she explores the concept of identity, gender stereotypes, as well as visual and cultural codes.

One of her latest photo essays was a collaboration with W Magazine entitled Selfie. In it, the author explores the concept of planned candid photos (‘plandid’).

The work was made for Instagram, as the platform is well known for the conflict between the ‘real self’ and the one people present online. Sherman started using Facetune, Perfect365 and YouCam to alter her appearance on selfies – in Photoshop, you can modify everything, but these apps were designed specifically to “make things prettier”- she says, and that’s what she wants to explore in this photo essay.

Tokyo Compression by Michael Wolf

Michael Wolf has an interest in the broad-gauge topic Life in Cities. From there, many photo essays have been derived – amongst them – Tokyo Compression .

He was horrified by the way people in Tokyo are forced to move to the suburbs because of the high prices of the city. Therefore, they are required to make long commutes facing 1,5 hours of train to start their 8+ hour workday followed by another 1,5 hours to get back home.

To portray this way of life, he photographed the people inside the train pressed against the windows looking exhausted, angry or simply absent due to this way of life.

You can visit his website to see other photo essays that revolve around the topic of life in megacities.

Final Words

It’s not easy to make photo essays, so don’t expect to be great at it right from your first project.

Start off small by choosing a specific subject that’s interesting to you –  that will come from an honest place, and it will be a great practice for some bigger projects along the line.

Whether you like to shoot still life or you’re a travel photographer, I hope these photo essay tips and photo essay examples can help you get started and grow in your photography.

Let us know which topics you are working on right now – we’ll love to hear from you!

wed

Check out these 8 essential tools to help you succeed as a professional photographer.

Includes limited-time discounts.

You'll Also Like These:

A woman is standing in front of a mirror.

Ana Mireles is a Mexican researcher that specializes in photography and communications for the arts and culture sector.

Penelope G. To Ana Mireles Such a well written and helpful article for an writer who wants to inclue photo essay in her memoir. Thank you. I will get to work on this new skill. Penelope G.

Herman Krieger Photo essays in black and white

Leave a Comment Cancel Reply

WELCOME TO SHOTKIT

Enter your email to be sent today's Welcome Gift: 19 Photography Tools

Thanks for subscribing! Please check your email for further instructions.

A black and white advertisement with a couple of black and white objects.

🔥 Popular NOW:

ipa-cover

Unlock the EXACT blueprint to capture breathtaking iPhone photos!

Shotkit may earn a commission on affiliate links. Learn more.

logo

How to create an outstanding Photo Essay

how to create a photo essay

If you are working on your photo essay and would wish to know how to create a successful one, we have some tips, tricks, and techniques outlined in this article. With the sophistication of digital publishing, you need to be on your A-game when creating digital photos that tell a story.

As a custom essay writing service , our ultimate goal in this article is to guide you on creating a photo essay without straining. We like it when writing, and creativity is fun altogether. Therefore, we have outlined examples, classifications, and a framework that you can use when creating your photo essay.

This article also bears the definition of what a photo essay is. And although you could use this as a professional or a student, you can pay someone to do your essay on our website. When you do so, a polished essay writer will work with you in creating a good photo essay,

We have creatives with expertise, a knack for experimentation, critical thinking and creativity, and an insatiable urge to produce top content. If it sounds like you could use our help, let us know the best way we can assist you in creating a perfect photography essay.

If, however, all you need is insights to point you in the right direction, here is how to create a good photo essay without straining. Let’s explore!

What is a Photo Essay?

Visual storytelling appeals to everyone who has a sense of sight.

Unlike your typical essay in college, a photo essay is a project where you present a series of photographs or images to tell a story, share a narrative, or push a theme/agenda. Thus, a photo essay facilitates picture-led storytelling , which is a creative innovation in photojournalism.

It is also known as a photographic or picture essay. A great photo essay powerfully evokes emotions and appeals to the understanding of its intended audience without using words or with minimal words alongside the series of images.

A perfectly-created photo essay narrates a story using many photographs that take the viewer along your narrative journey. Indeed, it proves that a picture is worth a thousand words. In this case, since there are many pictures/images, you could say a photo essay is rich in words, flavor, and content, yet it does not have words.

Talking of photo essays, Ansel Adams is one of the revered and famous photo essayists. Other photo essayists include James Nachtwey, Eugene Smith, and Nancy Borowick .

How to Create a Photo Essay in a step-by-step format

Here is a step-by-step approach to follow to successfully create a compelling and engaging photo essay:

Step 1 – Do your Research

If you are to create an attractive and relevant photo essay, begin by researching the best framework to adopt. Look at what people are doing out there and find out how creatively you can do it better. There are inexhaustible ideas and concepts that you can explore when writing a photo essay. If you’ve not chosen a topic, thorough research can help you decide on a topic and handle it well.

Step 2 - Choose a theme for your photo essay

With the research, you can already identify a specific theme or narrative for your picture essay. Therefore, highlight the theme or narrative, write some notes about the direction you will tackle and how you will reach and satisfy your audience.

Step 2 – Choose a topic that aligns with the theme

Following the findings from your research, choose a great topic. You are not that lucky photo essayist who opportunistically happens upon a story and turns it into a brilliant photo essay. Therefore, you should choose an attractive, reasonable, short, and memorable topic. You are free to select any topic that interests you and one that you find fun to work on. Your chosen theme or narrative can help define the topic for your photo essay.

Step 3 – Pick your subjects

With the theme/narrative and the topic, you can then choose your subjects. These are the people, things, sceneries, or places of central focus in your photography essay.  

The subjects are the ones that give your photo essay a voice, strengthen your narrative, and engage the audience.

Step 4 – Select your top images

Define the appropriate number of images that you intend to use when telling the story. For example, if you intend to leave the audience under suspense, choose which images to use and their order of appearance.  Your photo essay project does not have to use all your images but the best.

The best way to integrate your theme, narrative, and subjects is to create a storyboard that helps you decide how to tell the story. Then, when you lay your ideas out, a storyboard helps you focus on what is essential, especially when you have little control over a given subject.

Step 5 – ask for insights and input from others

After creating the storyboard, choosing the photos, and writing a narrative or theme statement, you can share it with someone knowledgeable for critique. You should also invite views and comments from another person. Ensure that you give the entire photo cache to the person so that they can choose, then compare with your best photos and tweak your choice accordingly.

Step 6 – Write the captions and text

With everything set, write the accompanying content for your photo essay. As well, make sure you caption each photo to enhance your visual narrative. Nothing is cast in stone here because you can also drop using image captions. You can experiment with lighting, tone, color, composition, angles, and location so that the narrative flows. Also, don’t forget to create introductory messages and closing messages. You need to have your signature introductory and closing images well-decided.

Step 7 – Edit your work

Now that you have created a photo essay, it is now time to edit everything. You can ask for help or rest and do it when you are energetic and objective. If you want a skilled essay writer to write you an excellent narrative to post alongside your photo essay, you can always trust our essay website.  We can also edit the narrative to maintain a good flow.

Step 8 – Publish/submit your work

If everything else is okay, convert the photo essay to the correct format and submit or publish it. Remember, photo essays can be a portion of a webpage, a webpage, a document, fashion publication, photo editorial, collage of images, or mixed media.

Helpful Tips when compiling your Photographic Essay

If you are on track to become a photo essayist, you need to grasp the most critical photo essaying tips, techniques, and tricks. Here is some best advice you could use to find a subject for your photo essay.

1. Try to tell a diverse and confident story

When you get out there to tell a story, make sure you do it most awesomely. Understand your target audience, do anything that will resonate with their needs, appeal to their emotions, logic, and thoughts, and leave them musing over your narrative. It is, therefore, vital that you consider what your key message will be and be confident when handling it in your photo essay.

2.Storyboard before building

Architects, surgeons, artists, engineers, you name the profession, all begin with either a sketch, blueprint or a plan to visualize the entire concept or creation before its actualization. In the real of photo essays, you have to be invested right from the beginning. Therefore, you need to create a storyboard that helps you to convert your vision, abstract thoughts, and ideas to a concrete plan that you can execute to succeed in your project. A storyboard also doubles as a shortlist for your photography project.

When storyboarding, you will notice that you take an outsider view, which helps you evaluate how every element fits into the larger picture – your narrative/theme. When doing it, you can discard otherwise burdensome but irrelevant content, which saves you time and leaves you to focus more.

Storyboarding is a critical, creative step when building a perfect photo essay as it ensures the flow to your viewers.

3. Have a visual structure

A contemporary photo essay follows a simple or basic framework that gives your theme direction and scope. Therefore, having a visual structure, marker, or framework helps you transform the photo series into a narrative. For instance, this Growing up young photo essay published in the BBC chooses to have quotes from the subjects running alongside the photos. Likewise, the picture essay done by photojournalist Stefanie Glinski titled  One Month in Kabul Under Taliban rule – a photo essay has narrative and captions to further illustrate the themes, content, and narratives.

4. Have a variety of images

To write an exceptional photo essay, ensure that you have as many photos or images as possible. Assemble as much as you think you will need for the project, then use your ruthless photo editing skills to pick the best photos.

Although shedding content hurts, it’s the only best way to achieve the best piece. It is also better to be in a dilemma of which photos to use than wish that you included a specific shot. Having multiple shots ensures that everything is captured. Then compiling your photo series becomes easier.

5. Edit your photos well

When editing, do it ruthlessly. While you cannot be Annie Leibovitz, Stefanie Glinski, or Ansel Adams, you certainly have to up your game to be at par with them. You can either use a professional editor. Alternatively, you can edit your photos using Photoshop, Illustrator, or other image-editing software. Whatever you choose your struggle to be, ensure that you end up with high-quality photos that make sense to your theme or narrative. If you have to refine an image to remove blemish or flaws, use it as long as it ends up fine. Make sure that the focus of each photo is visible and that unwanted areas are cropped out. If you are editing on your own, edit the photos a few days after the shoot to have an objective mind when doing it.

6. Choose the top 10 images

You are not just going to lazily throw images and words all over a structure and have it for the best photo essay out there. Instead, you need to select quality photos that will tell your narrative. Be keen enough to ensure that any photo that makes it to the top 10 list is compelling and poignant. If you notice that you don’t have good equipment to produce or capture quality photos, don’t be afraid to pull in a professional photographer.

7. Use outside input to perfect your choice

When working on a photo essay project, you are not necessarily an island. The photo essayists we’ve mentioned work with teams. You equally need to get a trusted, visually active, and sophisticated individual, professional, or friend to help you.

Have them look at the photos you took and ask them to choose the best. As well, provide them with a written description of your narrative and ask them to select their 10 best photos.

Compare their choice with yours and if they differ, make a point of asking the reason. Listen keenly and tweak your narrative and choice as they most likely reflect what an audience would perceive from the photo essay.

8. Select the best photos from the best

Based on the reasons from your external source (friend, editor, or photographer), select the 10 best photographs to use in telling your story. As well, change the narration if there is a need to tweak it.

9. Write reasonable captions

For your final choice of 10 images, write a befitting caption that will help to enhance your visual narrative. You need to be concise, brief, and clear. If the photos have a strong or exciting background story you wish to run, have the narrative written as content alongside the photos.

However, if you feel like the images can stand alone without captions, don’t beat yourself over it; leave them out. After all, using captions is not a must.

Look at this example of Black Lives Matter Photo Essay (Link to external site).

Apart from the caption, you can add text that contains data, complex metrics, or maps to support your narrative. Using maps can help drive the point home.

10. Focus on the details

Yes, the devil is always in the details. When you eventually display your photo essay to an audience, everybody analyzes it their way. However, when you capture the details, you will take care of each perspective, judgment, and reasoning from your audience. Ensure that you place everything in context and that everything is up to date.

11. Make it fun

Unlike college essays that come with challenges, creating a photo essay should be fun. Therefore, enjoy every bit of the project. Doing so helps you to step up your game, inspire creativity, and relaxes your mind. There is nothing creative and innovative you cannot do in a photo essay with a let loose sort of spirit.

12. Set the scene

When telling a story through photography, you are equally writing your story. Therefore, ensure that you set a scene to capture the moment that appeals to your audience.

For the events that you have no control over, try as much as possible to take photos that match your narrative or theme.

13. Experiment more when taking photos

There is no single bullet to creating an outstanding photo essay. To achieve perfection, let your photo essay express your story in the best way it can. Therefore, you need to test filter effects, use fonts, adjust the visuals, check the contrast, adjust color, hue, and feel, and crop your photos well. With experimentation comes creativity and innovativeness, which birth perfection.

Classification of Photo Essays

In terms of classification, there are two general classes of photo essays where all the genres of photo essays fall. These classes are narrative and thematic.

1. Narrative Photo Essays

A narrative photo essay, as the name suggests, tells a specific story. But, mainly, these types of photo essays tend to tell a peculiar and more direct story.

Unlike thematic photo essays, narrative photo essays give less freedom to the photo essayist. The use of text is to have some sense of completion to the story.

For instance, the 28 Days in Afghanistan by Andrew Quilty published in the SBS is a narrative photo essay that documents the photographer’s experience in the war-torn nation using both text and unadulterated photos.

The picture essay by photojournalist Stefanie Glinski titled  One Month in Kabul Under Taliban rule – a photo essay also falls under this category as it highlights her one-month encounter in Kabul.

2. Thematic photo Essays

Thematic photo essays are topic-specific. For example, they can be on politics, pollution, police brutality, global pandemic, poverty, crime, etc.

You have the freedom of choosing the subjects, location, and you do not necessarily have to incorporate text.

An example of a thematic photo essay is the “ They call us bewitched ” picture essay published in the Guardian. We also bumped into the Olympics Photos: Emotion runs high by the NBC News, which we find as an excellent thematic photo essay. Next, look at this Hurricane Katrina photo essay. It is thematic in the sense that it focuses on a natural disaster. Finally, if you want more examples, this photo essay titled “ From Trayvon Martin to Colin Kaepernick ” details the theme of Black Lives Matter/ police brutality.

Typical Photo Essay Examples/Genres to inspire your creativity

  • The daily life photo essay – A Day-in-the-life photo essay tells a story about the day-to-day life of a given subject. It could be a lawyer, president, celebrity, farmer, industrialist, pope, student, etc. most of these photographic essays evoke emotions and help the audience enter into the subject's world.
  • Transitioning through life photo essay – These are essays that detail photos of how people transform through life. It can be a photo of a celebrity, president, farmer, or famous person since they were young to date.
  • Special events photo essays – As the name suggests, these are photo essays on special events, festivities, and occurrences. The events can be weddings, burials, art exhibitions, car shows, auction events, or celebrations. They have very elaborate and relatable background objects that connect to the main idea.
  • Family photo essays – These can be photo essays on family members. You can include photos that show how the family has grown or detailing the family tree. They can also be family business photos that detail the leaders assigned roles to family businesses.
  • Protest photo essays – These are thematic photo essays that detail how protests occurred and paint a clear picture of the theme of such protests as the Black Lives Matter protests. When creating a protest photo essay, you should have information about the particular protest. Focus on incidents and protests that occurred in history.
  • Sports photo essays – Sports essays can be on sports events such as Olympics, Wimbledon, football leagues, or about sportsmen and women. For instance, the Skysports’ picture essay on Diego Maradona titled Diego Maradona: Images of a football Icon .
  • Medical Photo Essays – Organizations such as WHO , Universities , or CDC have various examples of medical photo essays. These visual illustrations focus on medical research, medical practice, diseases, and medical breakthroughs.
  • Scientific Photo Essays – Like medical essays, these photo essays detail scientific encounters, breakthroughs, inventions, etc.
  • Celebrity photo essays – You can create a photo essay on a celebrity.
  • Political photo essays are photo essays that capture and narrate political events, history, and news in a series of photographs and narratives. It could be about leftist and rightist politics or geopolitics as well as policy-making.
  • War photo essays – Captures the critical and significant elements of conflict, war, and peace. There are many samples online.
  • Timelapse photo essays – These are transformational photo essays that capture the changes of a subject through time. They might take longer to develop and can be on buildings, estates, cities, trees, or landscapes.
  • Relationship photo essays – This photo essay genre captures the interaction between people, families, and loved ones. It is the most common assignment in journalism class. It offers an excellent chance to capture emotions like love, family, and friendship.
  • Poverty photo essays – This genre of photo essays captures poverty from the standpoint of the subject. They can contain infrastructure, housing, amenities, food, water, etc. They are very emotional and can use narratives. They are the same as drought photo essays that capture how the drought has ravaged a geographic region of interest.
  • City photo essays – These are photographic essays that capture a city's feel, life, and pleasures. They are thematic in nature and allow you to focus on specific areas, moods, and feeling that such places evoke.
  • Education photo essays – Details issues in education. For instance, it can be a photo essay showing the disparity in access, challenges in education, or infrastructure in education. An example is The Many Faces of Learning, published in the Stanford Social Innovation Review. Another one is Embracing Education , published by the Lutheran World Federation.

As long as you can think of any topic, there is always a picture or photo essay genre where it can fall under. Remember, you can be asked to create a photo essay on a Word Document or PDF for class, which is where you get the chance to display your prowess and creativity.

Common Photo Essay Examples

Here are the famous photo essays that you can draw inspiration from:

  • Various American Natural Sites by Ansel Adams
  • “Everyday” by Noah Kalina
  • “Signed, X” by Kate Ryan 
  • “The Vietnam War” by Philip Jones Griffiths
  • “The Great Depression” by Dorothea Lange

Structure/Anatomy of a Photo Essay

Here is a blueprint or skeleton of how a basic photo essay can look like

Introductory text/content

This is where you type the text that explains or introduces the photo essay to your audience.

Signature Image

This is the strongest image that has a visual impact on the story you are running. It should be an image that invites the viewers to your story to be interested in looking further. In simple terms, this is your window, attention grabber, or icon; make it count.

This is the picture of a key player or the main subject of your story. You must ensure that the foreground and background elements reinforce the theme or narrative.

Where the subject is caught in real moments, such as in environmental portraits, is reportedly more compelling. You can use a series of posed portraits as well.

Overall wider view

This is the photograph that gives the viewers a sense of the place or part of the place where the story happens. You use such images to create a scene. It can also be a series of detailed images bundled together to set the scene.

Here, you need to follow up with a photograph that explains the finer details. The photo can be abstract but eye-catching in the sense that it draws the attention of the audience. It should be an image that reveals to the audience some aspect that is otherwise missed in a wider shot. You are allowed to use series of small detail photos as a mosaic in one image .

When defining an action, look for a photograph that shows the main theme in your story. For instance, if it is a Black Lives Matter protest, focus on a photo that captures banners, police, and protesters.  Specifically, focus on the most poignant or dramatic images that capture people interacting with one another. You can as well capture gestures or moments that amplify the visual narrative you want to communicate.

Closing Photo and text

This is the powerful closing photograph that lets your audience ponder more about your visual narrative. You can follow it with a text highlighting the thoughts you want the audience to reason with as they come to the end of your photo essay.

photo essay example for grade 6

Gradecrest is a professional writing service that provides original model papers. We offer personalized services along with research materials for assistance purposes only. All the materials from our website should be used with proper references. See our Terms of Use Page for proper details.

paypal logo

Student Sign In

photo essay example for grade 6

How to Create a Photo Essay in 9 Steps (with Examples)

Photo Editing , Tutorials

photo essay example for grade 6

This post contains affiliate links. If you use these links to buy something, we may earn a commission at no additional cost to you. We only recommend products we fully support or use ourselves.  Our full disclaimer

What is a photo essay?

  • Photo essays vs photo stories
  • How photo essays help you
  • 9 Steps to create photo essays

How to share your photo essays

Read Time: 11 minutes

Gather up a handful of images that seem to go together, and voila! It’s a photo essay, right? Well… no. Though, this is a common misconception.

In reality, a photo essay is much more thoughtful and structured than that. When you take the time to craft one, you’re using skills from all facets of our craft – from composition to curation.

In this guide, you’ll learn what makes a photo essay an amazing project that stretches your skills. You'll also learn exactly how to make one step by step.

  • Photo essay vs photo story

A photo essay is a collection of images based around a theme, a topic, a creative approach, or an exploration of an idea. Photo essays balance visual variety with a cohesive style and concept.

What's the difference between a photo essay and a photo story?

The terms photo essay and photo story are often used interchangeably. Even the dictionary definition of “photo essay” includes using images to convey either a theme or a story.

But in my experience, a photo essay and a photo story are two different things. As you delve into the field of visual storytelling, distinguishing between the two helps you to take a purposeful approach to what you’re making .

The differences ultimately lie in the distinctions between theme, topic and story.

Themes are big-picture concepts. Example: Wildness

Topics are more specific than themes, but still overarching. Example : Wild bears of Yellowstone National Park

Stories are specific instances or experiences that happen within, or provide an example for, a topic or theme. Example: A certain wild bear became habituated to tourists and was relocated to maintain its wildness

Unlike a theme or topic, a story has particular elements that make it a story. They include leading characters, a setting, a narrative arc, conflict, and (usually) resolution.

With that in mind, we can distingush between a photo essay and a photo story.

Themes and Topics vs Stories

A photo essay revolves around a topic, theme, idea, or concept. It visually explores a big-picture something .

This allows a good deal of artistic leeway where a photographer can express their vision, philosophies, opinions, or artistic expression as they create their images.

A photo story  is a portfolio of images that illustrate – you guessed it – a story.

Because of this, there are distinct types of images that a photo story uses that add to the understanding, insight, clarity and meaning to the story for viewers. While they can certainly be artistically crafted and visually stunning, photo stories document something happening, and rely on visual variety for capturing the full experience.

A photo essay doesn’t need to have the same level of structured variety that a photo story requires. It can have images that overlap or are similar, as they each explore various aspects of a theme.

An urban coyote walks across a road near an apartment building

Photo essays can be about any topic. If you live in a city, consider using your nature photography to make an essay about the wildlife that lives in your neighborhood . 

The role of text with photos

A photo story typically runs alongside text that narrates the story. We're a visual species, and the images help us feel like we are there, experiencing what's happening. So, the images add significant power to the text, but they're often a partner to it.

This isn’t always the case, of course. Sometimes photo stories don’t need or use text. It’s like reading a graphic novel that doesn’t use text. Moving through the different images that build on each other ultimately unveils the narrative.

Photo essays don’t need to rely on text to illuminate the images' theme or topic. The photographer may use captions (or even a text essay), or they may let the images speak for themselves.

Definitions are helpful guidelines (not strict rules)

Some people categorize photo essays as either narrative or thematic. That's essentially just calling photo stories “narrative photo essays” and photo essays “thematic photo essays.”

But, a story is a defined thing, and any writer/editor will tell you themes and topics are not the same as stories. And we use the word “story” in our daily lives as it’s defined. So, it makes far more sense to name the difference between a photo essay and a photo story, and bask in the same clarity writers enjoy .

Photo stories illustrate a particular experience, event, narrative, something that happened or is happening.

Photo essays explore an idea, concept, topic, theme, creative approach, big-picture something .

Both photo essays and photo stories are immensely powerful visual tools. And yes, the differences between them can certainly be blurred, as is always the case with art.

Simply use this distinction as a general guideline, providing extra clarity around what you’re making and why you're making it.

To dig into specific types of images used to create powerful photo stories, check out this training: 6 Must-Have Shots for a Photo Story. 

Meanwhile, let’s dig deeper into photo essays.

A sea nettle jellyfish floats alone on a white surface

Photo essays are a chance to try new styles or techniques that stretch your skills and creativity. This image was part of an essay exploring simplicity and shape, and helped me learn new skills in black and white post-processing.

How photo essays improve your photography

Creating photo essays is an amazing antidote if you’ve ever felt a lack of direction or purpose in your photography. Photo essays help build your photographic skills in at least 3 important ways.

1. You become more strategic in creating a body of work

It's easy to get stuck in a rut of photographing whatever pops up in front of you. And when you do, you end up with a collection of stand-alone shots.

These singles may work fine as a print, a quick Instagram post, or an addition to your gallery of shots on your website. But amassing a bunch of one-off shots limits your opportunities as a photographer for everything from exhibits to getting your work published.

Building photo essays pushes you to think strategically about what you photograph, why, and how. You're working toward a particular deliverable – a cohesive visual essay – with the images you create.

This elevates your skills in crafting your photo essay, and in how you curate the rest of your work, from galleries on your website to selecting images to sell as prints .

2. You become more purposeful in your composition skills

Composition is so much more than just following the rule of thirds, golden spirals, or thinking about the angle of light in a shot.

Composition is also about thinking ahead in what you’re trying to accomplish with a photograph – from what you’re saying through it to its emotional impact on a viewer – and where it fits within a larger body of work.

Photo essays push you to think critically about each shot – from coming up with fresh compositions for familiar subjects, to devising surprising compositions to fit within a collection, to creating compositions that expand on what’s already in a photo essay.

You’re pushed beyond creating a single pleasing frame, which leads you to shoot more thoughtfully and proactively than ever.

(Here’s a podcast episode on switching from reactive shooting to proactive shooting.)

3. You develop strong editing and curation skills

Selecting which images stay, and which get left behind is one of the hardest jobs on a photographer’s to-do list. Mostly, it’s because of emotional attachment.

You might think it’s an amazing shot because you know the effort that went into capturing it. Or perhaps when you look at it, you get a twinge of the joy or exhilaration you felt the moment you captured it. There’s also the second-guessing that goes into which of two similar images is the best – which will people like more? So you’re tempted to just show both.

Ultimately, great photographers appear all the more skilled because they only show their best work. That in and of itself is a skill they’ve developed through years of ruthlessly editing their own work.

Because the most powerful photo essays only show a handful of extraordinary images, you’re bound to develop the very same critical skill (and look all the more talented because of it).

Photo essays are also a great stepping stone to creating photo stories. If you’re interested in moving beyond stand-alone shots and building stories, shooting photo essays will get your creative brain limbered up and ready for the adventure of photo stories.

An American dipper looks into the water of a stream on a cold morning

A photo essay exploring the natural history of a favorite species is an exciting opportunity for an in-depth study. For me, that was a photo essay on emotive images of the American dipper (Cinclus mexicanus) as it hunts in streams. 

9 Simple steps to create your photo essays

1. clarify your theme.

Choose a theme, topic, or concept you want to explore. Spend some time getting crystal clear on what you want to focus on. It helps to write out a few sentences, or even a few paragraphs noting:

  • What you want the essay to be about
  • What kinds of images you want to create as part of it
  • How you’ll photograph the images
  • The style, techniques, or gear you might use to create your images
  • What “success” looks like when you’re done with your photo essay

You don’t have to stick to what you write down, of course. It can change during the image creation process. But fleshing your idea out on paper goes a long way in clarifying your photo essay theme and how you’ll go about creating it.

2. Create your images

Grab your camera and head outside!

As you’re photographing your essay, allow yourself some freedom to experiment. Try unusual compositions or techniques that are new to you.

Stretch your style a little, or “try on” the style of other photographers you admire who have photographed similar subjects.

Photo essays are wonderful opportunities to push yourself outside of your comfort zone and grow as a photographer.

Remember that a photo essay is a visually cohesive collection of images that make sense together. So, while you might stretch yourself into new terrain as you shoot, try to keep that approach, style, or strategy consistent.

Don’t be afraid to create lots of images. It’s great to have lots to choose from in the editing process, which comes up next.

3. Pull together your wide edit

Once you’ve created your images, pull together all the images that might make the cut. This could be as many as 40-60 images. Include anything you want to consider for the final essay in the wide edit.

From here, start weeding out images that:

  • are weaker in composition or subject matter
  • stand out like a sore thumb from the rest of the collection
  • Are similar to other stronger images in the collection

It's helpful to review the images at thumbnail size. You make more instinctive decisions and can more easily see the body of work as a whole. If an image is strong even at thumbnail size to stand out from similar frames while also partnering well with other images in the collection, that's a good sign it's strong enough for the essay.

4. Post-process your images for a cohesive look

Now it’s time to post-process the images. Use whatever editing software you’re comfortable with to polish your images.

Again, a photo essay has a cohesive visual look. If you use presets, filters, or other tools, use them across all the images.

5. Finalize your selection

It’s time to make the tough decisions. Select only the strongest for your photo essay from your group of images.

Each image should be strong enough to stand on its own and make sense as part of the whole group.

Many photo essays range from 8-12 images. But of course, it varies based on the essay. The number of images you have in your final photo essay is up to you.

Remember, less is more. A photo essay is most powerful when each image deserves to be included.

6. Put your images in a purposeful order

Create a visual flow with your images. Decide which image is first, and build from there. Use compositions, colors, and subject matter to decide which image goes next, then next, then next in the order.

Think of it like music: notes are arranged in a way that builds energy, or slows it down, surprise listeners with a new refrain, or drop into a familiar chorus. How the notes are ordered creates emotional arcs for listeners.

How you order your images is similar.

Think of the experience a viewer will have as they look at one image, then the next, and the next. Order your images so they create the experience you want your audience to have.

7. Get feedback

The best photographers make space for feedback, even when it’s tough to hear. Your work benefits from not just hearing feedback, but listening to it and applying what you learn from it.

Show your photo essay to people who have different sensibilities or tastes. Friends, family members, fellow photographers – anyone you trust to give you honest feedback.

Watch their reactions and hear what they say about what they’re seeing. Use their feedback to guide you in the next step.

8. Refine, revise, and finalize

Let your photo essay marinate for a little while. Take a day or two away from it. Then use your freshened eyes and the feedback you received from the previous step to refine your essay.

Swap out any selects you might want to change and reorder the images if needed.

9. Add captions

Even if you don’t plan on displaying captions with your images, captioning your images is a great practice to get into. It gives context, story, and important information to each image. And, more than likely, you will want to use these captions at some point when you share your photo essay, which we dive into later in this article.

Add captions to the image files using Lightroom, Bridge, or other software programs.

Create a document, such as a Google or Word doc, with captions for each image.

In your captions, share a bit about the story behind the image, or the creation process. Add whatever makes sense to share that provides a greater understanding of the image and its purpose.

Two rocks sit near each other on a wind-blown beach with long lines of texture in the sand

Photo essays allow you to explore deliberate style choices, such as a focus on shapes, patterns, textures, and lines. Since each photo is part of a larger essay, it encourages you to be bold with choices you might not otherwise make. 

5 Examples of amazing nature photo essays

1. “how the water shapes us” from the nature conservancy.

screenshot of the landing page of photo essay How The Water Shapes Us from Nature Conservancy

This gorgeous essay, crafted with the work of multiple photographers, explores the people and places within the Mississippi River basin. Through the images, we gain a sense of how the water influences life from the headwater all the way to the Gulf of Mexico. Notice how each photographer is tasked with the same theme, yet approaches it with their own distinct style and vision. It is a wonderful example of the sheer level of visual variety you can have while maintaining a consistent style or theme.

View it here

2. “A Cyclist on the English Landscape” from New York Times’ The World Through A Lens series

screenshot of the landing page of photo essay A Cyclist on the English Landscape from New York Times

This photo essay is a series of self-portraits by travel photographer Roff Smith while “stuck” at home during the pandemic. As he peddled the roads making portraits, the project evolved into a “celebration of traveling at home”. It’s a great example of how visually consistent you can be inside a theme while making each image completely unique.

3. “Vermont, Dressed In Snow” from New York Times’ The World Through A Lens series

screenshot of the landing page of photo essay Vermont, Dressed in Snow from New York Times

This essay by aerial photographer Caleb Kenna uses a very common photo essay theme: snow. Because all images are aerial photographs, there’s a consistency to them. Yet, the compositions are utterly unique from one another. It’s a great example of keeping viewers surprised as they move from one image to the next while still maintaining a clear focus on the theme.

4. “Starling-Studded Skies” from bioGraphic Magazine

screenshot of the landing page of photo essay Starling-Studded-Skies from bioGraphic Magazine

This beautiful essay is by Kathryn Cooper, a physicist trained in bioinformatics, and a talented photographer. She used a 19th century photographic technique, chronophotography, to create images that give us a look at the art and science of starling murmurations. She states: “I’m interested in the transient moments when chaos briefly changes to order, and thousands of individual bodies appear to move as one.” This essay is a great example of deep exploration of a concept using a specific photographic technique.

View it here   (Note: must be viewed on desktop)

5. “These Scrappy Photos Capture the Action-Packed World Beneath a Bird Feeder” from Audubon Magazine

screenshot of the landing page of photo essay by Carla Rhodes from Audubon Online

This photo essay from conservation photographer Carla Rhodes explores the wildlife that takes advantage of the bounty of food waiting under bird feeders . Using remote camera photography , Rhodes gives viewers a unique ground-level perspective and captures moments that make us feel like we’re in conversation with friends in the Hundred Acre Woods. This essay is a great example of how perspective, personality, and chance can all come into play as you explore both an idea and a technique.

25 Ideas for creative photo essays you can make

The possibilities for photo essays are truly endless – from the concepts you explore to the techniques you use and styles you apply.

Choose an idea, hone your unique perspective on it, then start applying the 9 simple steps from above. 

  • The life of a plant or animal (your favorite species, a species living in your yard, etc)
  • The many shapes of a single species (a tree species, a bird species, etc)
  • How a place changes over time
  • The various moods of a place
  • A conservation issue you care about
  • Math in nature
  • Urban nature
  • Seasonal changes
  • Your yard as a space for nature
  • Shifting climate and its impacts
  • Human impacts on environments
  • Elements: Water, wind, fire, earth
  • Day in the life (of a person, a place, a stream, a tree…)
  • Outdoor recreation (birding, kayaking, hiking, naturalist journaling…)
  • Wildlife rehabilitation
  • Lunar cycles
  • Sunlight and shadows
  • Your local watershed
  • Coexistence

A Pacific wren sings from a branch in a sun dappled forest

As you zero in on a photo essay theme, consider two things: what most excites you about an idea, and what about it pushes you out of your comfort zone. The heady mix of joy and challenge will ensure you stick with it. 

Your photo essay is ready for the world! Decide how you’d like to make an impact with your work. You might use one or several of the options below.

1. Share it on your website

Create a gallery or a scrollytelling page on your website. This is a great way to drive traffic to your website where people can peruse your photo essay and the rest of the photography you have.

Putting it on your website and optimizing your images for SEO helps you build organic traffic and potentially be discovered by a broader audience, including photo editors.

2. Create a scrollytelling web page

If you enjoy the experience of immersive visual experiences, consider making one using your essay. And no, you don’t have to be a whiz at code to make it happen.

Shorthand helps you build web pages with scrollytelling techniques that make a big impression on viewers. Their free plan allows you to publish 3 essays or stories.

3. Create a Medium post

If you don’t have a website and want to keep things simple, a post on Medium is a great option.

Though it’s known for being a platform for bloggers, it’s also possible to add images to a post for a simple scroll.

And, because readers can discover and share posts, it’s a good place for your photos to get the attention of people who might not otherwise come across it.

4. Share it on Instagram

Instagram has changed a lot over the last couple of years, but it’s still a place for photographers to share their work thoughtfully.

There are at least 3 great ways to share your photo essay on the platform.

– Create a single post for each image. Add a caption. Publish one post per day until the full essay is on your feed. Share each post via Instagram Stories to bring more attention and interaction to your photo essay.

– Create a carousel post. You can add up 10 photos to a carousel post, so you may need to create two of them for your full photo essay. Or you might create a series of carousel posts using 3-4 images in each.

– Create a Reel featuring your images as a video.  The algorithm heavily favors reels, so turning your photo essay into a video experience can get it out to a larger audience.

I ran a “create a reel” challenge in my membership community. One member created a reel with her still images around a serious conservation issue. It gathered a ton of attention and landed her opportunities to share her message through YouTube and podcast interviews and publishing opportunities. Watch it here.

5. Exhibit it locally

Reach out to local galleries, cafes, pubs, or even the public library to see if they’re interested in hanging your photo essay for display. Many local businesses and organizations happily support the work of local artists.

6. Pitch your photo essay to publications

One of the best ways to reach an audience with your work is to get it published. Find publications that are a great fit for the theme and style of your photo essay, then pitch your essay for consideration. You gain a fantastic opportunity to share your work widely and can earn a paycheck at the same time.

Remember that if you want to get your photo essay published, you may want to hold back from sharing it publicly before you pitch it to publications.

photo essay example for grade 6

PIN THIS FOR LATER

photo essay example for grade 6

Jaymi Heimbuch

Next up….

DSLR vs Mirrorless in 2024: Which Camera is Best for You?

DSLR vs Mirrorless in 2024: Which Camera is Best for You?

Cameras , How to Use Photo Gear , Tutorials

Discover the pros, cons, and features of each type to help you decide which camera is right for you and your photography needs.

Snow Photography Tips: Your Guide to Taking Great Photos in the Snow

Snow Photography Tips: Your Guide to Taking Great Photos in the Snow

Landscape Photography , Tutorials

Capture the beauty of winter with expert tips on photographing snow! From exposure to composition, learn how to take stunning snowy shots.

20 Wildlife Photo Contests to Enter (2024)

20 Wildlife Photo Contests to Enter (2024)

Tutorials , Wildlife Photography

Check out this list of the best wildlife photo contests and advice on how to enter. Plus get tips on how to maximize your chances of success.

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO READ TODAY?

POPULAR SEARCHES:  Best Cameras   |    Location Guide   |  Best Lenses   |  Wildlife  

Take The Quiz

Get super clear on exactly what to focus on right now to grow your photography skills fast..

Take the FREE Full Frame Ecosystem Assessment ™ to crack the code on your roadblocks so you can hop into the creativity express lane with personalized action steps!

Ready to level up your awesome?

Start your next learning adventure.

photo essay example for grade 6

52 Week Creativity Kit

A year of weekly bite-sized nature photography concepts and challenges that strengthen your camera skills and provide endless inspiration.

photo essay example for grade 6

6 Must-Have Shots for a Photo Story

New to photo stories? Start by learning how to create a powerful photo story with the 6 essential images that all photo editors want to publish.

photo essay example for grade 6

Photo Stories for Nature

Master how to photograph impressive photo stories and effectively share them so they make an impact.

photo essay example for grade 6

Conservation Filmmaking 101

Master how to craft powerfully moving films that create conservation impact.

Get The Most Popular Free Resources

Make leaps forward in your visual storytelling download three of our most valuable free resources for photographers..

photo essay example for grade 6

Ready to take better photos?

Get all the good things delivered.

Photography how-to guides, expert interviews, behind-the-scenes insights & more all delivered to your inbox weekly.

Privacy Overview

photo essay example for grade 6

  • PRO Courses Guides New Tech Help Pro Expert Videos About wikiHow Pro Upgrade Sign In
  • EDIT Edit this Article
  • EXPLORE Tech Help Pro About Us Random Article Quizzes Request a New Article Community Dashboard This Or That Game Popular Categories Arts and Entertainment Artwork Books Movies Computers and Electronics Computers Phone Skills Technology Hacks Health Men's Health Mental Health Women's Health Relationships Dating Love Relationship Issues Hobbies and Crafts Crafts Drawing Games Education & Communication Communication Skills Personal Development Studying Personal Care and Style Fashion Hair Care Personal Hygiene Youth Personal Care School Stuff Dating All Categories Arts and Entertainment Finance and Business Home and Garden Relationship Quizzes Cars & Other Vehicles Food and Entertaining Personal Care and Style Sports and Fitness Computers and Electronics Health Pets and Animals Travel Education & Communication Hobbies and Crafts Philosophy and Religion Work World Family Life Holidays and Traditions Relationships Youth
  • Browse Articles
  • Learn Something New
  • Quizzes Hot
  • This Or That Game New
  • Train Your Brain
  • Explore More
  • Support wikiHow
  • About wikiHow
  • Log in / Sign up
  • Education and Communications
  • College University and Postgraduate
  • Academic Writing

How to Make a Photo Essay

Last Updated: September 27, 2023 Fact Checked

This article was co-authored by Heather Gallagher . Heather Gallagher is a Photojournalist & Photographer based in Austin, Texas. She runs her own photography studio named "Heather Gallagher Photography" which was voted Austin's Best Family Photographer and top 3 Birth Photographers in 2017, 2018, and 2019. Heather specializes in family Photojournalism and has over 15 years of experience documenting individuals, families, and businesses all over the world. Her clients include Delta Airlines, Oracle, Texas Monthly, and her work has been featured in The Washington Post and The Austin American Statesman. She is a member of the International Association of Professional Birth Photographers (IAPBP). There are 11 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. This article has been fact-checked, ensuring the accuracy of any cited facts and confirming the authority of its sources. This article has been viewed 285,616 times.

Photo essays are an increasingly popular medium for journalists, bloggers, and advertisers alike. Whether you’re trying to show the emotional impact of a current news story or share your hobby with friends and family, images can capture your topic in a personal, emotional, and interesting way. Creating a photo essay can be as easy as choosing a topic, getting your images, and organizing the essay.

Things You Should Know

  • Reflect long and hard on your topic, considering your audience, current events, and whether to go for a thematic or narrative approach.
  • Create an outline, including your focus image, establishing shot, clincher, and other image details.
  • When you finally take your photos, remember to take more photos than you think you need and don't be afraid to let the project change as you create it.

Finding Your Topic

Step 1 Review current events.

  • Offer a photo essay of your place of business as a training tool.
  • Use a photo essay about your business as a sales or social tool by publishing it on your website or social media page.
  • Create a how to photo essay to help others learn about your hobby, so they can take it up as well. [4] X Research source

Step 4 Select an interesting subject.

  • Thematic subjects are big ideas including things like local gun laws, at-risk youth, or welcoming home soldiers.
  • Narrative essays can include a day in the life, how to tutorials, or progression series that show changes over time such as tracking a building project.
  • If you have been given a commission or specific publication to work with, you may need to choose a topic that will fit a thematic or narrative approach as outlined by the publication. Make sure you are aware of any publication guidelines in advance.

Organizing Your Shoot

Step 1 Get permission.

  • Consider how difficult it will be to get permission to photograph your subjects. If you already have relationships established, it will be easier. If not, allow for extra time to get permission and/or waivers.
  • Schools, daycares, and other places with kids typically have more regulations on who can be photographed and for what purposes. You’ll usually need to get parental approval, in addition to permission from those in charge. [7] X Research source

Step 2 Research your subject.

  • Consider doing interviews with people involved prior to the shoot. Ask things like, “What’s the most interesting thing you do during this event?” or “How long have you been involved with this organization?”
  • These interviews are also a great opportunity to ask for permission and get waivers.
  • If you’re going to visit a job site, charitable event, or other large group activity, ask the person or persons in charge to explain what you’re doing to everyone before you arrive. [8] X Research source

Step 3 Create an outline.

Capturing Your Images

Step 1 Check the light.

  • Many new photographers stay away from high ISO shots because they allow more light through producing a “busy” image. However, these images are often easier to edit later as there’s more information to work with. [11] X Research source
  • If it’s very bright in your location or you’ve set up artificial lighting, a low ISO is likely adequate, For darker areas, you’ll likely need to use a higher ISO.
  • If you need one second to capture an image with a base ISO of 100, you’ll need one eighth of a second to capture with an ISO of 800. [13] X Research source

Step 2 Consider composition.

  • Even snapping candid shots, which you may need to capture quickly, take a few moments to think about how objects are placed to make the most impact.
  • Always think about how the main subject’s surroundings play into the overall image, and try to create different levels and points of interest.
  • You can change composition as part of the editing process in some cases, so if you can’t line up the shot just right, don’t let it deter you from capturing the image you want. [14] X Research source

Step 3 Take more photos than you need.

Organizing the Essay

Step 1 Exclude photos you don’t need.

  • If you’re doing a day in the life photo essay about a frustrated person working in an office, an image of that person struggling to open the front door against the wind might be an apt focus shot.
  • If your essay is about the process of building a home, your focus image may be something like a contractor and architect looking at blue prints with the framed up home in the background.
  • If your essay is about a family reunion, the focus image may be a funny shot of the whole family making faces, pretending to be fighting, or a serious photo of the family posed together. Capture whatever seems natural for the family. [18] X Research source

Step 3 Categorize your remaining photos.

  • Regardless of essay type, you’ll need a focus image to grab attention.
  • Use an overall shot to give context to your essay. Where is it, when is it happening, who’s involved, what’s going on, and why should someone be interested? The five “W’s” of journalism are a great way to determine what your overall shot should capture.
  • Find your final image. This should be something provocative that asks your viewer to think about the topic.
  • Between the focus and overall shot and ending image, include a series of images that move the viewer from the lead-in shots to its result. Use images that build in intensity or draw the viewers further into the essay.

Step 5 Ask for feedback.

  • If the images aren’t telling the story, ask your friends to look at your other photos and ask, “I wanted this image to make this point. You got a different idea. Would any of these images make this point to you more clearly?”
  • If the others like the images you’ve chosen, you may still want to ask them to look at your other photos and tell you if they think any of the images you didn’t include should be added in. They may see something you missed. [20] X Research source

Step 6 Add text.

  • If you're commissioned to add photos to an essay, you should make sure images reflect the written word, but also add emotion and context the writing could not capture. For example, an essay on poverty may include an image of a child and parent living on the street could capture more emotional context.
  • Captions should only include information the viewer could not derive from the photo itself. For instance, you can include a date, the subject’s name, or a statistic relevant to your subject in the caption.
  • If you choose not to have any text or just a title and some introductory and/or closing words, make sure you convey all necessary information succinctly. [21] X Research source

Expert Q&A

Heather Gallagher

  • Be creative with your topics. However, something as simple as "things I like" will suffice so long as you stay creative. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Make sure you're familiar with your camera. It will make the photo composition a lot easier. Thanks Helpful 0 Not Helpful 0
  • Don't get discouraged. It may take several tries to get the desired results in your photos. Thanks Helpful 1 Not Helpful 0

photo essay example for grade 6

You Might Also Like

Write an Essay

  • ↑ http://digital-photography-school.com/5-photo-essay-tips/
  • ↑ Heather Gallagher. Professional Photojournalist & Photographer. Expert Interview. 8 April 2020.
  • ↑ http://improvephotography.com/30816/10-ideas-creative-photo-essays/
  • ↑ http://www.apogeephoto.com/how-to-create-a-photo-essay/
  • ↑ https://petapixel.com/how-to-create-a-photo-essay/
  • ↑ http://photo.journalism.cuny.edu/week-5/
  • ↑ http://clickitupanotch.com/2010/12/creating-a-photo-essay/
  • ↑ https://photographylife.com/what-is-iso-in-photography
  • ↑ https://wiredimpact.com/blog/how-to-make-a-photo-essay-nonprofit/
  • ↑ http://digital-photography-school.com/5-tips-for-creating-a-photo-essay-with-a-purpose/
  • ↑ https://www.format.com/magazine/resources/photography/how-to-make-photo-essay-examples

About This Article

Heather Gallagher

To make a photo essay, start by selecting a subject that is easy to capture and that inspires you, like a friend or a family pet. Then, decide if you want to present your photo essay as thematic, which shows specific examples of a big idea, or narrative, with a beginning, middle, and end. Next, create an outline of your essay to determine which photos you’ll need, like an establishing shot. Finally, take your photos, select which images you want to use in your essay, and organize them according to your theme before adding text to explain the essay. To learn how to capture the best images, keep scrolling! Did this summary help you? Yes No

  • Send fan mail to authors

Reader Success Stories

Anonymous

Sep 24, 2023

Did this article help you?

photo essay example for grade 6

Aug 3, 2016

Christopher Ulloa Abarua

Christopher Ulloa Abarua

Mar 16, 2018

Am I a Narcissist or an Empath Quiz

Featured Articles

Study Efficiently

Trending Articles

Everything You Need to Know to Rock the Corporate Goth Aesthetic

Watch Articles

Cook Fresh Cauliflower

  • Terms of Use
  • Privacy Policy
  • Do Not Sell or Share My Info
  • Not Selling Info

Don’t miss out! Sign up for

wikiHow’s newsletter

How to Make a Photo Essay: 5 Tips for Impactful Results

A Post By: Christina N Dickson

how to make a photo essay

Want to tell meaningful stories with your photos? That’s what a photo essay is all about: conveying concepts and narratives through a series of carefully chosen images.

While telling a story with photos can be a daunting task, there are several easy tips and techniques you can use in your photo essays to create striking, stunning, eye-opening results.

And that’s what I’m going to share in this article: five photo essay tips that you can immediately apply to your photography. You’ll leave as a better photo essayist than when you arrived!

Let’s get started.

What is a photo essay?

A photo essay is a collection of images placed in a specific order to convey certain emotions , specific concepts, or a progression of events.

In other words:

The photo essay tells stories just like a normal piece of writing , except with images instead of words. (Here, I’m using the term “story” loosely; as mentioned above, photo essays can encapsulate emotions or concepts in addition to traditional, time-based narratives.)

fire in the street photo essay

Plenty of world-class photojournalists use photo essays, including Lauren Greenfield, James Nachtwey, and Joachim Ladefoged. But the photo essay format isn’t exclusive to professionals, and photo essays don’t need to cover dramatic events such as wars, natural disasters, and social issues. Whether you are a complete beginner, a hobbyist, or a professional, the photo essay is a great way to bring your images to life, tell relevant stories about your own surroundings, and touch your family, friends, and coworkers.

So without further ado, let’s look at five easy tips to take your photo essays to the next level, starting with:

1. Find a topic you care about

Every good photo essay should start with an idea .

Otherwise, you’ll be shooting without a purpose – and while such an approach may eventually lead to an interesting series of photos, it’s far, far easier to begin with a topic and only then take out your camera.

As I emphasized above, a photo essay can be about anything. You don’t need to fixate on “classic” photo essay themes, such as war and poverty. Instead, you might focus on local issues that matter to you (think of problems plaguing your community). You can also think about interesting stories worth telling, even if they don’t have an activism angle.

For instance, is there an area undergoing major development? Try documenting the work from start to finish. Is there a particular park or nature area you love? Create a series of images that communicate its beauty.

a nice park

One key item to remember:

Photo essays are most powerful when you, as the photographer, care about the subject. Whether you choose to document something major and public, like an environmental crisis, or whether you choose to document something small and intimate, like the first month of a newborn in the family, make sure you focus on a topic that matters to you .

Otherwise, you’ll struggle to finish the essay – and even if you do successfully complete it, viewers will likely notice your lack of passion.

2. Do your research

The best photo essays involve some real work. Don’t just walk around and shoot with abandon; instead, try to understand your subject.

That way, you can capture a more authentic series of photos.

For instance, if you document a newborn’s first month , spend time with the family. Discover who the parents are, what culture they are from, and their parenting philosophy.

a newborn child

If you cover the process of a school’s drama production, talk with the teachers, actors, and stagehands; investigate the general interest of the student body; find out how the school is financing the production and keeping costs down.

If you photograph a birthday party, check out the theme, the decorations they plan on using, what the birthday kid hopes to get for their gifts.

If you’re passionate about your topic, the research should come easy. You should enjoy learning the backstory.

And then, when it comes time to actually shoot, you’ll have a much clearer understanding of the topic. You’ll know the key players in the story, the key ideas, and the key locations. You’ll be able to hone in on what matters and block out the flashy distractions.

Make sense?

3. Find the right angle

Once you’ve done your research, you’ll know your topic inside and out.

At which point you’ll need to ask yourself:

What is the real, authentic story I want to tell?

Every story has a hundred different angles and perspectives. And trying to share the story from every perspective is a recipe for failure.

Instead, pick a single angle and focus on it. If you’re documenting a local issue, do you want to focus on how it affects children? The physical area? The economy? If you’re documenting a newborn’s first month, do you want to focus on the interaction between the newborn and the parents? The growth of the newborn? The newborn’s emotions?

a parent and their child photo essay

As you’ll find out during your research, even stories that seem to be completely one-sided have plenty of hidden perspectives to draw on.

So think about your story carefully. In general, I recommend you approach it from the angle you’re most passionate about (consider the previous tip!), but you’re always free to explore different perspectives.

4. Convey emotion

Not all photo essays must convey emotion. But the most powerful ones do.

After all, think of the stories that you know and love. Your favorite books, movies, and TV shows. Do they touch you on an emotional level?

Don’t get me wrong: Every photo essay shouldn’t cover a sappy, heartstring-tugging tale. You can always focus on conveying other emotions: anger, joy, fear, hurt, excitement.

(Of course, if your story is sappy and heartstring-tugging, that’s fine, too – just don’t force it!)

How do you convey emotions, though? There’s no one set way, but you can include photos of meaningful scenes – human interactions generally work well here! – or you can simply show emotion on the faces of your photographic subjects . Really, the best way to communicate emotions through your photos is to feel the emotions yourself; they’ll bleed over into your work for a unique result.

a protester with lots of emotion

5. Plan your shots

Once you’ve done the research and determined the angle and emotions you’d like to convey, I recommend you sit down, take out a pen and paper, and plan your photo essay .

Should you extensively visualize each photo? Should you walk through the venue, imagining possible compositions ?

Honestly, that’s up to you, and it’ll depend on how you like to work. I do recommend that beginners start out by creating a “shot list” for the essay. Here, you should describe the main subject, the narrative purpose of the image, plus any lighting or composition notes. Once you become more experienced, you can be looser in your planning, though I still recommend you at least think about the different shots you want to capture.

You can start by planning 10 shots. Each one should emphasize a different concept or emotion, but make sure to keep a consistent thread running through every composition; after all, the end goal is to create a powerful series of images that tell a story.

One final tip:

While you should stick to your plan pretty closely, at least at first, don’t ignore the potential for spontaneity. If you see a possible shot, take it! You can later evaluate whether it’s a worthwhile addition to your essay.

a toxic container on a beach

Photo essay tips: final words

Now that you’ve finished this article, you know all about what photo essays are, and – hopefully! – how to create a beautiful essay of your own.

a community gardening event photo essay

Just remember: storytelling takes practice, but you don’t have to be an incredible writer to pull off a powerful photo essay. All you need is a bit of photographic technique, some creativity, and a lot of heart.

Once you start to tell stories with your photos, your portfolio will never be the same!

Now over to you:

Do you have any tips for doing photo essays? Do you have any essays you’re proud of? Share them in the comments below!

How to Make a Photo Essay: 5 Tips for Impactful Results

Read more from our Tips & Tutorials category

Christina N Dickson

is a visionary artist and philanthropist in Portland Oregon. Her work includes wedding photography www.BrideInspired.com and leadership with www.RevMediaBlog.com .

Some Older Comments

Digital Photography School

  • Guaranteed for 2 full months
  • Pay by PayPal or Credit Card
  • Instant Digital Download

camera.jpg

  • All our best articles for the week
  • Fun photographic challenges
  • Special offers and discounts

camera.jgg

  • Share full article

Advertisement

Supported by

‘Where We Are’: A Photo Essay Contest for Exploring Community

Using an immersive Times series as inspiration, we invite teenagers to document the local communities that interest them. Contest dates: Feb. 14 to March 20.

A group of friends sitting on an orange picnic blanket in a sun-dappled park, surrounded by green grass and trees.

By The Learning Network

The Covid-19 pandemic closed schools and canceled dances. It emptied basketball courts, theaters, recreation centers and restaurants. It sent clubs, scout troops and other groups online.

Now, many people have ventured back out into physical spaces to gather with one another once again. What does in-person “community” look like today? And what are the different ways people are creating it?

In this new contest, inspired by “ Where We Are ” — an immersive visual project from The New York Times that explores the various places around the world where young people come together — we’re inviting teenagers to create their own photo essays to document the local, offline communities that interest them.

Take a look at the full guidelines and related resources below to see if this is right for your students. We have also posted a student forum and a step-by-step lesson plan . Please ask any questions you have in the comments and we’ll answer you there, or write to us at [email protected]. And, consider hanging this PDF one-page announcement on your class bulletin board.

Here’s what you need to know:

The challenge, a few rules, resources for teachers and students, frequently asked questions, submission form.

Using The Times’s Where We Are series as a guide, create a photo essay that documents an interesting local, offline community. Whether your grandmother’s Mah Jong club, the preteens who hang out at a nearby basketball court, or the intergenerational volunteers who walk the dogs for your neighborhood animal shelter, this community can feature people of any age, as long as it gathers in person.

We encourage you to choose a community you are not a part of for reasons we explain below, in the F.A.Q.

Whichever community you choose, however, it’ll be your job to interview and photograph them. Then, you’ll pull everything together in a visual essay, which will tell the group’s story via a short introduction and a series of captioned photographs.

Your photo essay MUST include:

Between six and eight images, uploaded in the order in which you’d like us to view them.

A short caption of no more than 50 words for each image that helps explain what it shows and why it is important to the story.

A short introduction of up to 300 words that offers important background or context that complements and adds to the information in the photos and captions. You might consider the introduction the beginning of your essay, which the photos and captions will then continue. Together they will answer questions like who this community is, how it came to be, and why it matters. (Our How-To guide offers more detail about this.)

At least one quote — embedded in either the introduction or one of the captions — from a member of the community about what makes it meaningful.

In addition to the guidelines above, here are a few more details:

You must be a student ages 13 to 19 in middle school or high school to participate , and all students must have parent or guardian permission to enter. Please see the F.A.Q. section for additional eligibility details.

The photographs and writing you submit should be fundamentally your own — they should not be plagiarized, created by someone else or generated by artificial intelligence.

Your photo essay should be original for this contest. That means it should not already have been published at the time of submission, whether in a school newspaper, for another contest or anywhere else.

Keep in mind that the work you send in should be appropriate for a Times audience — that is, something that could be published in a family newspaper (so, please, no curse words).

You may work alone, in pairs, or in groups of up to four for this challenge , but students should submit only one entry each.

Remember to get permission from those you photograph, and to collect their contact information. Learn more about this in the F.A.Q. below.

You must also submit a short, informal “artist’s statement” as part of your submission, that describes your process. These statements, which will not be used to choose finalists, help us to design and refine our contests. See the F.A.Q. to learn more.

All entries must be submitted by March 20, at 11:59 p.m. Pacific time using the electronic form below.

Use these resources to help you create your photo essay:

A related Student Opinion question to help you brainstorm ideas before you begin taking photos.

A step-by-step guide that uses examples from the Where We Are series to walk students through creating their own.

Free links to the “Where We Are” Collection :

1. The Magic of Your First Car 2. At This Mexican Restaurant, Everyone is Family 3. Where the Band Kids Are 4. In This Nigerian Market, Young Women Find a Place of Their Own 5. At Camp Naru, Nobody Is ‘an Outlier’ 6. For Black Debutantes in Detroit, Cotillion Is More Than a Ball 7. At This Wrestling Academy, Indian Girls Are ‘Set Free’ 8. In Seville, Spain, These Young Rappers Come Together to Turn ‘Tears Into Rhymes’ 9. For a Queer Community in Los Angeles, This Public Park Is a Lifeline 10. In Guatemala, A Collective of Young Artists Finds Family Through Film 11. On a Caribbean Island, Young People Find Freedom in ‘Bike Life’ 12. At This Texas Campus Ministry, ‘Inclusive Love’ Is the Mission 13. For Young Arab Americans in Michigan, the Hookah Lounge Feels like Home

An activity sheet for understanding and analyzing the Where We Are series.

Lessons on interviewing and taking photographs . While these two resources were originally created for our 2022 Profile Contest , each contains scores of tips from educators and Times journalists that can help students learn to interview, and to take and select compelling photographs that tell a story.

Our contest rubric . These are the criteria we will use to judge this contest. Keep them handy to make sure your photo essay meets all of the qualifications before entering.

Below are answers to your questions about writing, judging, the rules and teaching with this contest. Please read these thoroughly and, if you still can’t find what you’re looking for, post your query in the comments or write to us at [email protected].

QUESTIONS ABOUT CREATING YOUR PHOTO ESSAY

What is a photo essay? How does it differ from just a series of photos?

A photo essay tells a story through a series of images. These images work together and build on each other to explore a theme of some kind. The photo essays in the Where We Are series, for instance, focus on the themes of community and coming-of-age, but each through a different lens, as the three images published here illustrate. Together they are beautiful examples of how visual collections can investigate ideas by illuminating both the “big picture” and the tiny, telling details.

How do I choose a good subject for this?

Our Student Opinion forum can help via its many questions that encourage you to brainstorm local, offline communities of all kinds.

Can I be a member of the community I photograph?

You can, but we encourage you not to. Part of the point of this contest is to help you investigate the interesting subcultures in your area, and expand your understanding of “community” by finding out about groups you otherwise may never have known existed.

But we also think it will be easier to do the assignment as an outsider. You will be coming to the community with “fresh eyes” and relative objectivity, and will be able to notice things that insiders may be too close to see.

If you do choose to depict a community you are a part of, we ask that you do not include yourself in the photos.

I’d like to work with others to create this. How do I do that?

You can work alone, with a partner, or with up to three other people. So, for example, in a group of four, two people might act as photographers, while the other two interview community members. When you are ready to edit your material and write up what you have discovered, the interviewers could use their notes to handle the short introduction, while the photographers could edit their shots into a meaningful visual sequence, and help collaborate on the captions.

Please remember, however, that you can only have your name on one submission.

Do I need permission to photograph the people in this community?

You do. It is good journalistic practice to tell the people you are photographing why you are taking pictures of them, and to ask their permission. They should also know that, if you are a winner, their image and name may appear online.

Though you do not have to have a signed permission sheet from every participant, if you are a winner and we publish your work, we will need to be able to reach those depicted, so please get their contact information before you take their pictures. (If you are photographing young children, this is especially important. Secure a parent or guardian’s permission first.)

An important exception to this: If you are taking photos of crowds in public places, such as at a sporting event, a community meeting or a local fair, you don’t need to worry about permissions, as it would be impossible to get them from all attendees.

I don’t know where to begin! What advice do you have?

Once you’ve chosen a community to photograph, begin by introducing yourself to ensure the participants are open to your project. Then, devote a bit of time to just observing, noticing how and where the members of this group spend time, what they do together, and how they relate to each other.

When you’re ready to start documenting what you find, our step-by-step guide will help you take it from there.

QUESTIONS ABOUT JUDGING

How will my photo essay be judged?

Your work will be read by New York Times journalists as well as by Learning Network staff members and educators from around the United States. We will use this rubric to judge entries.

What’s the prize?

Having your work published on The Learning Network and being eligible to be chosen to have your work published in the print editions of The New York Times.

When will the winners be announced?

About two months after the contest has closed.

QUESTIONS ABOUT THE RULES

Who is eligible to participate in this contest?

This contest is open to students ages 13 to 19 who are in middle school or high school around the world. College students cannot submit an entry. However, high school students (including high school postgraduate students) who are taking one or more college classes can participate. Students attending their first year of a two-year CEGEP in Quebec Province can also participate. In addition, students age 19 or under who have completed high school but are taking a gap year or are otherwise not enrolled in college can participate.

The children and stepchildren of New York Times employees are not eligible to enter this contest. Nor are students who live in the same household as those employees.

Why are you asking for an Artist’s Statement about our process? What will you do with it?

All of us who work on The Learning Network are former teachers. One of the many things we miss, now that we work in a newsroom rather than a classroom, is being able to see how students are reacting to our “assignments” in real time — and to offer help, or tweaks, to make those assignments better. We’re asking you to reflect on what you did and why, and what was hard or easy about it, in large part so that we can improve our contests and the curriculum we create to support them. This is especially important for new contests, like this one.

Another reason? We have heard from many teachers that writing these statements is immensely helpful to students. Stepping back from a piece and trying to put into words what you wanted to express, and why and how you made artistic choices to do that, can help you see your piece anew and figure out how to make it stronger. For our staff, they offer important context that help us understand individual students and submissions, and learn more about the conditions under which students around the world create.

Whom can I contact if I have questions about this contest or am having issues submitting my entry?

Leave a comment on this post or write to us at [email protected].

QUESTIONS ABOUT TEACHING WITH THIS CONTEST

Do my students need a New York Times subscription to access these resources?

No. Students can get free access to the entire Where We Are series through The Learning Network . (All 13 photo essays are listed above, in our Resources section.) In addition, our related student forum , activity sheet and “how to” guide are also free, as are everything they link to.

However, if you are interested in learning more about school subscriptions, visit this page .

I’m not an art teacher. Can this work for my students too?

Yes! Though this is a new contest for us, we chose it in part because the theme of “community” is such an important one in subjects across the curriculum. In fact, we hope it might inspire teachers in different curriculum areas to collaborate.

For example, students in social studies could investigate the role of community locally, learning about the history of different influential groups. An English teacher might support students as they interview and craft their introductions and photo captions, while an art teacher could offer tips for photo composition. And, of course, a journalism teacher could guide the full project, or work with other teachers to publish the most successful results in the school paper.

How do my students prove to me that they entered this contest?

After they press “Submit” on the form below, they will see a “Thank you for your submission.” line appear. They can take a screenshot of this message. Please note: Our system does not currently send confirmation emails.

Please read the following carefully before you submit:

Students who are 13 and older in the United States or the United Kingdom, or 16 and older elsewhere in the world, can submit their own entries. Those who are 13 to 15 and live outside the United States or the United Kingdom must have an adult submit on their behalf.

All students who are under 18 must provide a parent or guardian’s permission to enter.

You will not receive email confirmation of your submission. After you submit, you will see the message “Thank you for your submission.” That means we received your entry. If you need proof of entry for your teacher, please screenshot that message.

Here is an example of how you might submit a photo with a caption and a photographer credit (Ashley Markle is the photographer):

If you have questions about your submission, please write to us at [email protected] and provide the email address you used for submission.

  • Getty Artists Program
  • College Faculty and Students
  • School Visits
  • Virtual Speaker Series
  • On-Demand Webinars
  • Curricula and Teaching Guides
  • Student Art Activities
  • Getty Books in the Classroom
  • Getty at Home
  • Youth Programs
  • Education Department Highlights

For the Classroom

Grade 6 Arts Module: Basic Photography

This Self-Learning Module (SLM) is prepared so that you, our dear learners, can continue your studies and learn while at home. Activities, questions, directions, exercises, and discussions are carefully stated for you to understand each lesson.

Each SLM is composed of different parts. Each part shall guide you step-by-step as you discover and understand the lesson prepared for you.

Pre-tests are provided to measure your prior knowledge on lessons in each SLM. This will tell you if you need to proceed on completing this module or if you need to ask your facilitator or your teacher’s assistance for better understanding of the lesson. At the end of each module, you need to answer the post-test to self-check your learning. Answer keys are provided for each activity and test. We trust that you will be honest in using these.

Please use this module with care. Do not put unnecessary marks on any part of this SLM. Use a separate sheet of paper in answering the exercises and tests. And read the instructions carefully before performing each task.

This module was designed and written with you in mind. It is here to help you master art. The scope of this module permits it to be used in many different learning situations. The language used recognizes the diverse vocabulary level of students. The lessons are arranged to follow the standard sequence of the course. But the order in which you read them can be changed to correspond with the module you are now using.

After going through this module, the learner is expected to:

1. Realizes that art processes, elements and principles still apply even with the use of technologies.

2. Understands concepts and principles of photography.

3. Identifies the parts and functions of the camera (point and shoot or phone camera).

4. Applies composition skills to produce a printed photograph for a simple photo essay.

Grade 6 Arts Quarter 3 Self-Learning Module: Basic Photography

Can't find what you're looking for.

We are here to help - please use the search box below.

Leave a Comment Cancel reply

  • Goals and Objectives
  • Our Friends
  • Privacy Policy
  • Long Term Projects
  • The Freedom Essay Contest
  • Essays of the Contestants. European Day of Languages
  • Learning to write. Reading for information
  • Serious reading. Useful for improving text comprehension
  • Students – share travelling reviews
  • Pupils’ creative approach. Sharing ideas
  • Student opinions on technology, anime, video games
  • Literature Reviews
  • European Day of Languages
  • Discover the world
  • Everyday English
  • Raising Social awareness
  • Literature insight
  • Politics Review
  • 5th Graders. Level A1
  • 6th Graders. Level A2
  • 7th Graders. Level B1
  • 8th Graders. Level B2
  • ICT Integration

The Voice Space - Online Collaboration Platform for Learning and Teaching English Language

May 31, 2019

Picture Description: Examples. Grade 6. Level A2

This photo shows a short brick wall, the bricks looks new because they’re clean but they’re scratched. The bricks are red with white colors. Next to the wall on the left there is a fence , same on the right side. The fence is made of wire and wood. And There are goats that are running and jumping over the wall. The first one to finish goat has some kind of toy attached to him. I imagine it’s a giraffe. The giraffe has a hat on her head. Other goats behind the first goat has some kind of toys attached to them too. Judging by the situation I think it’s a goat race. I imagine it’s really fun. On the ground we can see green grass. In the background there’s green trees or bushes. Judging by the trees it’s summer or early autumn. It looks like it’s sunny.

This is a photo of 4 teenagers watching a film. All of them are smiling. I imagine they‘re watching a comedy. Judging by their emotions the photo was made at funny part of the film. It looks like they‘re enjoying the movie. Judging by their clothes, it‘s warm inside or outside. A guy is wearing jeans and light blue t-shirt. A girl next to the guy, is wearing jeans and a purple top. The girl in the middle is wearing a purple top too, but a pink t-shirt. The girl in the right side is wearing light blue jeans and light red top. I guess they are wearing shoes for specific reason.

This photo shows two men fighting for a ball in a football match in the foreground. In the background, I imagine, are another two footballers running for the ball too. I can see lights in the back all around the area, and because of that, the shadows of them are very long.

The fans in the stadium are shouting for a goal. From the face mimic, I can guess that these footballers are really angry and are trying to get the ball really hard. I can understand that they are going for a goal.

Guessing by the clothes, this is “Liverpool” playing versus “Chelsea”.

This photo shows a monkey on the rope, in the jungle. In the foreground we can see a black, orange and brown monkey. I imagine that she is going to the tree house, because monkey is walking on the rope. This monkey is so cute, maybe because monkeys are one of my favourite animals! In the background we can see a lot of leaves. Judging by the trees, it`s summer or spring. I think behind the monkey there are more of them, because it`s jungle. I would call this monkey Trevor, because I think this name is best for this monkey. If you get a closer look, you can see that there are lots of ropes, so maybe it`s like a maze. I don`t think it is height, cause I can see a tree, witch is falling down, and also I can see a ground.

In this photo I see many people . Judging by there smiles I guess they are happy and having fun. They are playing beach volleyball, perhaps, they are on vacation. In the horizon I see light blue sea or maybe an ocean. Judging by the sunglasses and bikinis the day is very sunny and hot. On the left of this photo I see a ship or a fishing platform. People are playing on the beach and the sand looks so warm and beautiful like in San Francisco.

Share this: tell a friend

In Learning to write. Reading for information

describing a picture using active phrases examples of picture descriptions locating picture description speculating

Previous Post

Amar October 11, 2023

Hi this post made my day. Fun and entertaining good luck to you

Dominykas May 31, 2019

Whehe, funny picture with the goats, by the way, good descriptions, we are learning this topic this week, maybe, these shall come in handy ty

What do you think? Leave a reply:) Cancel reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed .

February 11, 2021

Online Story – Integrating English and ICT

March 8, 2020

Time Capsule. ICT and English Integration. Level B1_B2. Grade 8.

March 7, 2020

Balanced diet – description. Grade 5. Level A. Integration with Health Care Specialists @Basanavičius.

Quote of the month, learn more about literature here:).

Browse Categories

For gallery – click here.

kXWEv3oBpoI

© 2024 Platform for students and teachers of English language

Theme by Anders Norén

Notification Bell

Photo Essay

Loading ad...

Profile picture for user Maverick2417

MARIVIC D. CRISOSTOMO

Applies composition skills to produce a printed photograph for a simple photo essay.

  • Google Classroom
  • Microsoft Teams
  • Download PDF

Photo  Essay

photo essay example for grade 6

  • Mar 24, 2021

Essays in 6th Grade: A Basic Format that Elevates the Standard 5-Paragraph Structure

photo essay example for grade 6

6th grade is such a funny year. Funny haha and funny weird. Student writing levels are all over the map. You will have students coming to you writing on a very elementary level, still needing loads of help with grammar and paragraph formation. Then, you will have students ready to write critique pieces and analyses. How do you navigate this? Read to find out more!

Give Them a Format...to Start

I've learned that 6th graders still need format . They still need structure. They still need checklists. As much as I loathe limiting them in this way, I think it is very reassuring to them. That's not to say you can't tweak for the strong writers, but I do still feel they need it.

For my students in particular, I like to let them dabble in looser formats of non-fiction writing in other ways. They do book reviews , a debate , podcasting , etc. They are offered choices in reading responses to non-fiction reading and analysis, too. My classes actually write digital eBooks, too. But on the whole, they are expected to write two essays with a very similar format twice a year.

Bye-Bye 5-Paragraph Essay

Alright, so this is kind of not totally true. My students do end up writing 5 paragraphs, but that typical structure we all commonly know, I navigate away from. I think it's a fine format, but as they get into middle school they are expected to compare a LOT more and not focus on one specific topic . They are expected to follow through on a thread, a claim, a theme, an idea and how it is shown in various sources. And this is super new for them, analyzing various sources on the same concept. They really need a structure for this.

So, the typical essay, before they get to me, goes like this, and it is a good precursor:

Introduction that states your thesis and 3 major reasons to support your claim.

Conclusion that looks a whole lot like the introduction.

This format does not allow analysis of multiple sources and if you throw in other sources, it gets messy. Instead, I gear my students to focus on each source separately, then comparing them all.

The Format that Works (Research and Literary Analysis)

First of all, it's important to know what essays I actually do with my kiddos. I do a research unit. This changes almost every year, but typically they choose some kind of topic, I group them based on their topic choice. First, they do research (non-fiction skills) using a book, article, and video. They then use those sources to write an essay on a claim they make based on their topic. Later, they make eBooks in groups based on their topic.

The other essay I do is Literary Analysis . This follows a dystopian unit . They read a dystopian book in book clubs. Then, I have them choose from a short list of short stories that are dystopian. Lastly, we watch the movie The Truman Show . (This year I had them watch "The Scarecrow" on YouTube since we were hybrid due to the pandemic). They then determine a theme that is true for all three sources and write an essay based on that theme.

This essay format works for both of these essays. So here it goes!

photo essay example for grade 6

Introductory and Conclusion Statements

In a traditional essay, students have to write a hook, their claim/thesis, and essentially ANOTHER three sentences that state what their essays will be about. In my opinion, all of this is completely unnecessary. How many times do you read introductions in books? Okay, real avid readers do, but in reality many people don't. So for these, I tell my students to get right to the point .

Here's what should be in their introductory and conclusion statements:

A statement that introduces the topic. (This is a hook of some kind. I sometimes tell them to start it with "in our world..." or "in our lives..." and something that relates to their topic. Or just starting it with their topic and explaining what it is.)

The claim/thesis.

A statement that references there are differences and similarities in the sources. (For example: "[Title of sources] support this claim in different and similar ways." That's it.)

This all ends up being 2-3 sentences.

Topic Sentences

I have my students start their essay prep with topic sentences. This helps them get a sense of where their essays will go.

The big thing to understand here is how the paragraphs are set up .

Body #1: Focus on source #1 and how it shows claim/thesis.

Body #2: Focus on source #2 and how it shows claim/thesis.

Body #3: Focus on source #3 and how it shows claim/thesis.

Body #4: Focus on how ALL SOURCES show the claim/thesis in the same way.

So they start with creating topic sentences for those paragraphs. Each topic sentence is set up like this. The last topic sentence would start with "all sources..." instead of "source title".:

photo essay example for grade 6

Body Paragraph Format

In the picture you see below, I have specific colors for specific aspects of body paragraphs. ALL body paragraphs follow this format in that exact sequence/order. I will be completely honest, I don't give them a ton of wiggle room since this is pretty new to them. However, my stronger writers dabble in mixing evidence stems and elaboration stems around.

photo essay example for grade 6

Their paragraph starts with the topic sentence they already prepared. From there, the next sentence begins with an evidence stem . Here are a few examples of evidence stems:

According to the text,

The author states,

In [title],

Right after the evidence stem, in the same sentence, they add their text detail to support their topic sentence. I encourage them to quote exactly from the text for most text details. They can paraphrase, too, but should really try to get exact lines.

In regards to quoting, I also mention to them not to quote plop . I made this up. I plan on making a product for this at some point. A quote plop is bad . It's when students take a line from the text and just plop it in their essay. I show them how to break up the quote from the text with their own words.

So, a first sentence may look like this: According to the text [evidence stem, highlighted green] , when Luke was hiding due to being a third child, "they took the woods away" , [text detail with context, a.k.a. not just plopping the quote in the sentence, highlighted yellow].

Directly after that sentence should be an elaboration stem with an elaboration explaining how the text detail shows their claim/thesis. Students highlight this entire sentence in blue and their claim within it dark blue. Here are some elaboration stems:

This proves [claim] because...

This shows [claim] because ...

After that they do the same process two more times; two more text details with elaborations. Lastly they do a closing sentence .

photo essay example for grade 6

Comparison Paragraph: This is set up almost exactly the same, except the focus is on how ALL the sources show the claim in the same way. They then provide a NEW text detail from each source to prove how the claim is being shown similarly in each.

photo essay example for grade 6

Once all their body paragraphs are written, I have them go review their introductory and conclusion statements, put everything into a final draft and leave the highlights in the essay . This helps them visualize all the components and helps me grade!

For revision, the focus is on not quote plopping, being sure their details support their thesis, changing up the wording of claims/theses, and rearranging for strong writers.

Bottom Line

While this is very limiting for some, it is super helpful for struggling writers. Having that checklist and having the highlights helps students visualize what they need to compare sources in an essay format.

I'd say it'd be great to introduce this in 6th and by 8th, they can certainly make these more interpretive, creative, and unique.

You can find a lot more detail about this in the product below . What you see here is only a taste. This contains a full sample essay, checklists, tips, and more. You can also edit it to meet your needs.

photo essay example for grade 6

************

Want a custom bundle from me click below.

photo essay example for grade 6

Teachers Pay Teachers Store

Recent Posts

Why I Don't Do a Daily Reading Log: What I Do Instead

Online Research, Note-Taking, & Argument Essay: Student Choice Driven

Memoir Reading Unit: Engaging Non-fiction

shape sketchbook assignment

Sketchbook assignments.

Sketchbook assignment 5:  halloween/autumn drawing, sketchbook assignment 6:  doodle for google, sketchbook assignment 10 :.

  • TEN experiments in types of font, handwriting, size, shape, etc.
  • TEN experiments in logos, symbols, initials, etc.

Sketchbook Assignment 11:  Present Bow

Picture

  • Begin with contour
  • Value:  highlights and shadows
  • Gradation:  smooth transition between values
  • Texture:  creating a shiny illusion

Sketchbook Assignment 12:  Compass Composition

  • use the compass to create overlapping circles of various sizes
  • use the whole page--some circles should go off the page
  • use a sharpie marker to color in shapes created by the overlapping circles
  • consider composition:  balance of positive and negative space, balance of "busy" and "restful"

Sketchbook Assignment 13:  Key Value Study

  • Divide your sketchbook page into six, 3" x 3" squares
  • In each square, draw a different section of a key.  You may use different keys.
  • Work from observation.
  • Use graphite/pencil.
  • Shade in each square (using a full range of value) in such a way that you create contrast between the squares (See examples).
  • Due Friday, January 15th--Last sketchbook assignment of the semester!

Sketchbook Assignment 14:  Mandala

  • Your mandala may be black and white, or you may add color.
  • Craftsmanship is important:  neat and careful work.

Sketchbook Assignment 15:  World inside a Lightbulb!

Sketchbook assignment 16:  what is in you heart, sketchbook assignment 17:  painted value scales:   ​tints and shades.

  • Draw two 7" value scales either in your sketchbook or on a separate scrap of paper.
  • Divide value scale into 1" sections
  • Designate one value scale for tints and one for shades
  • Strive to make each section a different value!

Picture

Sketchbook Assignment 18:  Dry Brushed Sphere!

Sketchbook assignment 19:  non-objective mini paintings.

  • monochromatic
  • complementary
  • split complementary
  • double complementary

Sketchbook Assignment 20: Snapchat Selfie!

Sketchbook assignment 21:  hand holding an object, sketchbook assignment #22:  watercolor techniques.

  • rubbing alcohol
  • plastic wrap

Sketchbook Assignment #23:  6 "Drawings in the Round"

Picture

Sketchbook Assignment #24:  Crumpled Paper!

  • Partially crumple up a piece of paper and decide what angle you are going to work with.
  • Lay out your composition by "clocking angles" you see in the paper still life.
  • Shade the drawing using a FULL range of value, making sure to make your darks, DARK!
  • Over exaggerate highlights and shadows so that you create contrast in your drawing.
  • Eliminate most lines from your drawing, using value to define the form.

Picture

Sketchbook Assignment #25:  "Slice of Heaven"

Picture

Hand holding an object!

shape sketchbook assignment

ART with DESCH

a place to find class information, student work, events and inspiration

Design Challenge 1, DUE Friday 9/20/19

Title: “Hello My Name Is”

This is a branding challenge for yourself. You will design a logo for yourself, a design that represents you. You will have to self-promote yourself with this logo. Consider what types of shapes, lines, colors etc. represent you.

Sketch 3 ideas. In the 4th sketch apply the logo and show how you would use it in either a website, brochure, business card…just a real life application.

Write one sentence that describes how the logo represents you.

Design Challenge 2, DUE Friday 9/27/19

Title: “Industrial Design- Parts, Purposes, Complexities”

Find a tool like a hot glue gun, hair dryer, drill, mixer, food processor…etc.  it is very important to look closely at objects and systems in order to notice their intricacies, nuances, and details.

1.    Draw the entire tool in detail.

2.    Draw each individual part and pieces on the same page or different page.

3.    Attempt to label some of the parts in your drawings. Be creative and makeup names for the parts if don’t know the names.

  Design Challenge 3, DUE Friday 10/4/19

Title: “Old to New”

Look up old advertisements for Volkswagon and Macintosh from the 1980’s and before.

Sketch 1: Sketch your favorite old(1980's and before) Volkswagon ad

Sketch 2: Sketch your favorite old(1980's and before) Macintosh ad

Sketch 3: RE-design one of the old Volkswagon ads so it fits into contemporary times, how do you upgrade it??

Sketch 4: RE-dedesign one of the old Macintosh ads so it fits into contemporary times, how do you upgrade and re-design this ad?

  Design Challenge 4 , No school on Friday so DUE Monday 10/14/19 

Title: “Re-thinking the color blue”

One of America’s most popular colors is blue. There are so many variations on the hue-from images of the ocean to the color of the flag.  This challenge is about how many different ways you can interpret the color blue.

A NEW magazine called BLUE just hired you as a designer to brainstorm ideas. You don’t have to restrict yourself to literal interpretations.

Sketch 1: Design the new cover for this magazine that has things solely associated with the idea of blue.

Sketch 2:  Make a list of articles that might appear in this magazine, list at least 5.

Sketch 3: Draw the title and illustration that would go with one of the articles you listed above

Sketch 4: Design a second page in the magazine, think layout and images

  Design Challenge 5, DUE Friday 10/18/19

Title: “Space Re-design”

Your personal spaces where you tend to spend a lot of time become like second nature in your daily routines. Like your bedroom, the CHS commons or one of your classrooms.  Reconsider one of these spaces as a designer. How could you improve upon the space?

Sketch 1: Make a map of the current location. It could be an above view.

Sketch 2: brainstorm in a list format things that make this space good or bad. List the purpose of the space. List things that you find could improve about the space. Make some observations, how do you interact with the space. Does the space feel comfortable? Does it flow?

Sketch 3 and Sketch 4: Create a new design with improvements.  What is a new solution to improve this space? Create a new map. Make notes, labels and commentary on exactly how your new sketch meets the challenge.

Design Challenge 6, DUE Friday 10/25/19

This week I'd like for you to just draw and design what you like, what you enjoy, what interests you, basically make whatever you want in your sketchbooks. Use whatever materials you have available and whatever techniques you want to try. MAKE FOUR PAGES.

Design Challenge 7, DUE Friday 11/1/19

VIDEO GAME WORLD DESIGN: A game world is not just a backdrop for your game—be it minimal or detailed, contained or part of a much bigger universe, it provides the context for your player. Ultimately, a game world should feel alive and wholly unique to any player who will experience it.

Sketch 1:  Sketch a current world from a popular game or a favorite game of yours.

Sketch 2: Sketch a concept for a game world based on a location in your real life. Write a few notes about why this fits with a game concept you made up.

Sketch 3: Sketch a concept for a game world, but consider MOOD and AMBIENCE in your design. Write a few notes and consider the addition of color in your sketch.

Sketch 4: Sketch a concept for a game that takes place outside. Consider movement, and how the player will move through the world. This impacts the design of the world. Write a few notes.   Design Challenge 8, DUE Friday 11/8/19

Sketch 1: Collage an interesting image using scraps of paper found in the scrap bin or from old magazines.  It must include REDs, ORANGEs, YELLOWs, GREENs, BLUEs, and PURPLEs

Sketch 2: Sketch a cereal box or other food product focusing on the packaging design and layout.

Sketch 3: Sketch a drink, focusing again on the packaging design, layout and logo.

Sketch 4: Sketch an original packaging design for a product that doesn’t fit into a traditional form like a cube. Remember target audience and the purpose of getting someone to pick up your product. 

Design Challenge 9, DUE Friday 11/15/19

Typefaces and Font Designs

  Sketch 1: Look up the word typography and write up a definition.

Sketch 2: Do a Google image search for Typography and sketch one of the more interesting designs that you find.

Sketch 3: Use letters/fonts/typeface to create a picture of a person, place or object.

Sketch 4: Look at the most widely used typeface on the planet, Helvetica, and do a Re-design of the font. Use the letters A-B-C to re-design the classic look of Helvetica. For example you could make the corners a little curvy or the font thinner.

Design Challenge 10, DUE Friday 11/22/19

Why are the following artist/designers considered some of the most influential designers from the 20th and 21st century?

 GRAPHIC DESIGN:

Sketch 1: Look up the Portland based famous graphic design, Aaron Draplin.

Sketch a few of his designs and describe their look and why you think he resonates with a younger audience.

 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN:

Sketch 2: Who is Frank Gehry? Sketch one of his buildings. What makes his designs so unique compared to an average building?

 FASHION DESIGN:

Sketch 3: Who is Manolo Blahnik? Sketch one of his designs? Why are his designs so famous?

 PRODUCT DESIGN:

Sketch 4: Who is Jonathan Ive? What did he design? Sketch an example. What made his designs so innovative and groundbreaking?

Design Challenge 11, DUE Friday 12/6/19: You should be spending at least 15 minutes per drawing, I will not give full credit for poor effort.

Sketch 1: Create a Design that shows symmetrical balance. Consider the principles of compositional movement when sketching your design.

Sketch 2: Create a Design that shows asymmetrical balance. Consider the principles of compositional movement when sketching your design.

 Sketch 3: Create a Design that incorporates and focuses on the Principle of Pattern and Rhythm. Consider trying an organic pattern with flowing irregular rhythm.

 Sketch 4: Create a Design that uses the Principle of Contrast to show an image with

 an Emphasis or a focal point. 

Design Challenge 12, Due Friday 12/13/19 You should be spending at least 15 minutes per sketch, I will not give full credit for poor effort.

Sketch 1:  Search for a fashion design online that is part of famous designer's 2019 spring collection. For example, you could image search Calvin Klein's spring collection and sketch one of the outfits you see.

Sketch 2: Look up one of these three designers and sketch one of their fashion designs. VERSACE ,  PIERRE CARDIN, or DONNA KARAN OR Sketch one of the fashion designs worn at this year’s Met Gala(write the name of the designer by your sketch)

Sketch 3: Create your own fashion design for a specific season, sketch it.

Sketch 4: Create a second fashion design for a different season and sketch it.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS! NO SKETCHBOOK ASSIGNMENT DUE ON FRIDAY 12/20

Design challenge 13, due friday jan. 10th.

Interior Design

Design and sketch the interior of a bedroom.

Design and sketch the interior of a family room, play room or basement.

Design and sketch the interior of a kitchen or bathroom.

Design and sketch the interior of the ultimate Tree House.

You should be spending at least 15 minutes per drawing, I will not give you credit for poor effort. Use whatever materials are available to you.

Design Challenge 14, Due Friday JAN. 17TH

SHOW ME SKETCHES FROM YOUR FASHION DESIGN PROJECT. EACH GROUP MEMBER SHOULD BE PARTICIPATING IN THE SKETCHING PROCESS. SHOW ME AT LEAST 2 DIFFERENT IDEAS YOU CONTRIBUTED.

Design Challenge 15, Due Friday JAN. 24TH

 FOUR DRAWINGS : You can draw, paint, OR collage anything you feel inspired to create! Have fun.

Sketchbook 13 and 14: Due Tuesday 1/20 and Friday 1/23

4 Sketches of your ideas for the Duvall Fire Fighters art contest. Click here to see the handout with contest criteria.  

1  Final drawing on white paper with pen and color pencil. Remember only 3 colors allowed. 

Sketchbook 12: Due Friday Jan. 9th

Sketch1: Sketch a chair.  Draw from real life not a photo.

Sketch 2: Sketch a table, couch or bed. Draw from real life not a photo.

Sketch 3: Sketch a piece of furniture you find in a magazine or online. Find a design you admire.

Sketch 4: Sketch an idea for an original chair. 

Sketchbook 11: Due Monday Dec. 8th

Sketch 1: Sketch ideas for your fashion piece.

Sketch 2: Sketch ideas for your fashion piece. 

Sketch 3: Sketch ideas for your fashion piece.

Sketch 4: Free Draw!

Sketchbook 10: Due Monday Nov. 17th

Create four sketches that revolve around the theme of the Environment. 

Sketchbook 9: Due Monday Nov. 10th

Sketch 1-2: Collage a color wheel using magazine scraps/pages.  Include all values of yellows, reds, blues, greens, oranges, and purples. 

Sketch 3-4: Design a cereal box. First invent a new cereal brand and then consider both color, typeface and layout design. 

Sketchbook 8: Due Monday Nov. 3rd

Free Draw x 4 pages. Draw, paint or collage whatever you feel like creating on four pages or sections of your journals. 

  Sketchbook 7: Due Friday 10/27

 Sketch1-2: This will equal two sketches.

 Look for examples of the alphabet in real life.  You can use your cell phones or a camera to complete this assignment, see attached handout for examples. If you do not have access to a camera then sketch the letters you find in environment. Draw them in small thumbnail (1” or 2”) boxes, but only do 13 of the letters since it will take much longer to draw them vs. photographing them.

You do not have to print the pictures, just bring your cameras/phones on Monday.

Sketch 3-4: This will also equal two sketches.

Design the masthead(Title) and cover for a new magazine devoted solely to things that are associated with the idea of blue. Consider the magazine name, suggestions for art and what kinds of articles you think the editor should include. Most importantly consider the typography and what it says about your magazine.

Don’t restrict yourself to literal interpretation

Sketchbook 6: Due Friday 10/17

In the following sketches, consider your Typeface and Font choices and how they influence the design.

Sketch1: An editor at a major publishing company has contacted you and asked if you’ll brainstorm cover concepts for a book about the perceptions of beauty. Ironically, the book is titled Ugly by author Jane Kingslaner.

Sketch 2: Brainstorm and sketch a second concept for the book Ugly.

Sketch 3: A beverage company has contacted you to brainstorm label and packaging ideas for a new power-energy drink called Vibe.  The company wants to stress the fact that their drink is of course “different” from the other energy drinks on the market in that it is made from organic ingredients and 100% all natural.

Sketch 4: Sketch a second idea for the energy drink label/packaging.  

Sketchbook Assignment 5: Due Monday 10/10

Logo: A symbol or other small design adopted by an organization or business to identify its products, uniform, vehicles, etc: "the Olympic logo".  SHAPES, LINES, SINGLE LETTERS AND/OR WORDS are often used within a logo design.

 Sketch1: Sketch a corporate, small business or Non-Profit logo design that you find interesting and visually appealing. Look online, around school, around Duvall/Carnation/Redmond or your home to find this example. 

Sketch 2: Sketch another corporate, small business or Non-Profit logo design that you find interesting and visually appealing. Look online, around school, around Duvall/Carnation/Redmond or your home to find this example.

  Sketch 3: Brainstorm! Make a list of 5-10 possible pretend companies, businesses or Non-Profits that you would like to work for or start.

Sketch 4: Sketch an idea for a logo design to go with one of the items on your list.

Sketch Journal Assignment 4, Due Friday 10/3

 Create FOUR pages of anything you would like to express about the theme of MUSIC. Experiment and explore some new ideas and techniques on these pages.  YOU CAN DRAW, PAINT, COLLAGE OR WRITE. YOU CAN ALSO CREATE YOUR IMAGES ON TOP OF PREVIOUS DRAWN ON PAGES.

Sketchbook Assignment 3: Due Monday 9/29(I will be absent on Friday)

Sketch 2:  Draw a contour line drawing of an object.  Draw a shape around this object.  Now color in the “negative space”.  Your object now appears in the white space and your negative space is a dark color.  

 Sketch1:  Find an ordinary everyday SYMBOL (ex. Street sign) and alter it into a new design.

  Sketch3:  Overlap, distort and/or alter two or more letters in your name and create a logo for yourself.  Add color if available and think about what colors represent you.

Sketch 4:  Use the name of an object to draw the object. For example, you could repeat the word strawberry over and over again to form the image of a strawberry. 

Sketchbook Assignment 2, Due 9/19

Sketch 1:  Draw 10 different types of line. Observe the inside of your hand and draw the many lines you see.

Sketch 2 : Draw an image that uses either organic or geometric shape

Sketch 3 : Use value to draw an image that shows form.

Sketch 4 : Use color to draw an image that has texture. 

Sketchbook Assignment 1, Due 9/12

Directions:  Your first assignment is about getting over the fear of a blank book and allowing for freedom and creativity. You will simply be covering pages with backgrounds and borders that will be drawn over top of in future assignments. Each page can now be “used” and hopefully the white page syndrome of the sketchbook will fall by the wayside. Remember you are not creating finished works, but creating interesting surfaces or borders to draw onto later.

  Complete 8 pages, here are SOME options you could explore: REMEMBER THESE ARE SIMPLY SUGGESTIONS, YOU CAN COME UP WITH YOUR OWN TECHNIQUES TOO.

You could draw a border around a page that is made up of doodles with pencil or pen-Put your drawing tool on a page -Close your eyes and draw for 30 seconds - Create a two color wash on the page.(wash=watered down paint, or watercolor) - Collage text on the page - Scribble on the page with pencil; blend with a paper towel to create a value - Create a one color wash on the page - Cut squares in the page - Draw a childlike drawing on the page and paint over it - Create a repetitive pattern on the page using a geometric shape - Find a simple object and cover the page with simple contour drawings of it - Using muted colors paint a page - Create a texture on the page with paint by lifting paint with a towel - Create a negative space painting with a wash - Cover the page with writing about your first day and summer - Collage random pieces on the page - Cut strips of colored paper and glue to the surface - Doodle on the page with a pen - Trade books and have another student treat the surface of a page - Tear a page out and re-collage onto another page - Find a leaf outside - Represent the leaf in some way on the page.

  • Toggle navigation

COMD 1100, fall 2017

A city tech openlab course site.

COMD 1100, fall 2017

Assignment 2- Shape

COMD 1100 Prof Diamond

Design Element – SHAPE

Shape Project

Dictionary definition. “The external form or appearance characteristic of someone or something; the outline of an area or figure”.

Shapes are 2 dimensional and can be organic or geometric, irregular or regular. They may refer to a form, such as a figure, plant, object etc, but exist as a 2 dimensional area with little reference to 3 dimensional properties.

Positive and Negative shape when used in art and design refer to the areas around the dominant shape, what we usually call background.    

Project- Organic shape, positive/ negative

  • Research – on the internet look for images of plants, flowers, leaves etc and find an image that interests you which contains an overall movement of plants, leaves etc across the page.
  • Sketch- do any preliminary sketching to practice shapes, composition etc.
  • Make Sure all sides of your page are crossed over with a part of the drawing, a leaf or branch etc. Cropping on all sides!
  • Final sketch is 9”x12 ” either sketch paper or directly on Bristol
  • Can also use tracing paper
  • Maintain 1” border around drawing.
  • Divide the composition with thin line.
  • ½ the composition will be drawn with white positive shapes (plant shapes) on BLACK inked NEGATIVE SHAPES
  • ½ the composition will be drawing with plant shapes in black on WHITE NEGATIVE SHAPES.
  • Mirror, reflective, and radial symmetry and repetition pattern
  • look at resources, images and examples
  • Unit derived from roughly 2”x2” thumbnail detail within plant drawing- Look for interesting abstract neg/pos composition.
  • Edit/Tranform—mirror, flip horizontal, flip vertical
  • Make 4 moves of each unit design to create SYMMETRICAL DESIGN which includes MIRROR and REFLECTION symmetry.
  • Then, expand project by reducing scale of each design and multiply/repeat to create repetition patterns.

The OpenLab at City Tech: A place to learn, work, and share

The OpenLab is an open-source, digital platform designed to support teaching and learning at City Tech (New York City College of Technology), and to promote student and faculty engagement in the intellectual and social life of the college community.

New York City College of Technology

New York City College of Technology | City University of New York

Accessibility

Our goal is to make the OpenLab accessible for all users.

Learn more about accessibility on the OpenLab

Creative Commons

  • - Attribution
  • - NonCommercial
  • - ShareAlike

Creative Commons

© New York City College of Technology | City University of New York

DMS ART

7th Gr. Sketchbook Assignments

shape sketchbook assignment

  • Fill the page with a variety of lettering styles. Be creative! Find a poem - a favorite song - a list of favorite sayings - your favorite things.
  • Start with pencil (very light) move to COLORED PENCIL . Outline thick letter styles in SHARPIE!
  • Erase pencil lines!
  • YOU MUST have 15  or more different styles!

3rd - 2D & 3D Arrows Sketchbook

  • Create a full page composition using a combination of 3-dimensional and 2-dimensional arrows (see example on how to make them).
  • Use overlapping to break up the spaces into interesting positive and negative shapes.
  • Outline with a felt-tipped pen/Sharpie. Erase pencil lines!
  • Think up an interesting color scheme and fill some of the negative shapes (background spots, NOT the arrows) with colored pencil OR marker
  • Create your very own Superhero -  Please do not turn in Superman, Cat Women, Spider Man, "Japanimation" or any other copies!  Invent your own, please .
  • Your drawing must be in color (colored pencil) & outlined in Sharpie and take up entire page
  • Include your action hero's name, his/her superpowers and super-talents . Also, write what this hero's biggest pet peeve is... what do you have to do to really tick this person off? And if you did... what would they do to you? (Be inventive, not violent, please.)
  • (You need to draw the person AND write about them)

Image result for draw what scares you sketchbook

  • Doesn't have to be spooky ghosts and traditional stuff ( but it can be )....
  • What else is scary? That Biology test? A bad hair day? Breaking out before a date? The dentist? Your dad's wardrobe? A coach on a really bad day?
  • OK to include words as part of your design! You can mix your personal scary things with traditional if you want to.
  • Remember to keep it "PG-13" rated, fill your page, add color with colored pencils, and outline in Sharpie (don’t forget to erase pencil lines)!

Image result for fallen leaves sketchbook

  • It's fall and harvest time! Go "harvest" some leaves!
  • Find several different types (shapes ) of leaves and draw them into your sketchbook.
  • You need to draw at least three leaves , filling the page. They may overlap each other.
  • Draw them first in pencil and then use colored pencil to color them realistically. Erase pencil!                         
  • DO NOT OUTLINE IN MARKER/SHARPIE!

shape sketchbook assignment

Quarter 2 Sketchbook Assignments

shape sketchbook assignment

Unlike the expressive lines, directional lines are very precise. Lines should all be the same thickness. These lines look as if they are bending and overlapping. This is not "free" like expressive lines) but calculated constant, and even. Start anywhere on your paper. Move in a certain direction. Stop and begin in a new direction  Keep lines in a group the same distance apart Try to go in every direction at least once Use pencil with ruler or straightedge! NO OUTLINING in SHARPIE!

shape sketchbook assignment

  • Design and Draw Your Own Cartoon Strip
  • Minimum of 4 frames
  • if you don't have a cartoon strip idea, you can:   Draw A Day In Your Life in Cartoon 
  • Very important: do not copy another artist! Invent theses images yourself

Outline and use Color (colored pencil OR marker)!

Fill the page! (within the border)

You can include words (lettering!), voice or thought "bubbles!

Quarter 3 Sketchbook Assignments

shape sketchbook assignment

  • You will be creating at least six continuous bands of COLOR showing VALUE (light to dark). (You can think of them as loops - like flat and really long rubber bands.
  • Each band must reach at least 2 sides of the paper.
  • Each band must cross or be crossed by at least 2 other bands.
  • Bands should be at least 1/4" wide, with consistent width.
  • One path will appear to be above another at each crossing site (you'll have to plan, and erase one set of lines.)

shape sketchbook assignment

  • You Choose:  the THEME and build from there. Start with the name of the park and DRAW THE SIGN at the entrance gate.  Include as many points of interest in your park as you can fit on the page . They can overlap each other.  
  • Will your  park have booths, shows, concerts, rides, food? What kinds of each? Give them interesting names that fit the theme.
  • Use:  the whole page, and let your lettering and color be a part of your page design.
  • Your poster design should entice us all to buy a ticket to your theme park.
  • YOU MUST OUTLINE in SHARPIE & ADD COLOR with COLORED PENCILS  

shape sketchbook assignment

  • Using pencil, construct a complete maze.
  • ***Begin by drawing a 1" border around your page.
  • Remember  that the goal is an interesting and balanced page design. Asymmetrical designs are almost always better than symmetrical.
  • FILL the PAGE ,   OUTLINE & COLOR !!!
  • Avoid large, regular negative spaces. It’s okay if paths go off the page. 

shape sketchbook assignment

  • Fill the page with overlapping shapes that run off the page on all sides. Fill each pos/neg space with smooth pencil gradations (from light to dark).  Change the direction the shading goes on each shape.
  • The Shading Do-Nots:   Do  not  smear the drawing with your finger or a tissue.  Do  not  start out too dark - you can always get darker as you work.  Do  not  use mechanical pencils. (Sorry- won't work!)
  • The Do's:  Do make a flat edge on the tip of your pencil lead by "coloring" a sharpened tip on a piece of scrap paper.  Do shade in one direction only... then shade the opposite direction on top.  Do shade from light layers to dark to avoid uneven transitions.

Quarter 4 Sketchbook Assignments

shape sketchbook assignment

  • First ,  choose a subject, topic, area of interest- something you really like and then: try to think of as many aspects of the subject as possible. What are all the pieces and parts that make this interesting to you?
  • Next ,  combine all these parts into a full page composition. You might overlap sections to break up the negative space, or you can decorate or design a background to unify the parts.
  • Get  as many parts in as you can. Very sizes, use close-ups, zoom in, zoom out, change the angle, include words, phrases, names. Make them part of your design.
  • You must OUTLINE with SHARPIE & ADD COLOR!

shape sketchbook assignment

  • Overlap  shapes of graduated sizes, moving from  smallest to largest (largest on top- draw it first)  to create an illusion of movement toward you from the surface of the page.  Fill the page  with various sized trails.
  • Shade  back of the spiral trail gradually darker, and front lighter to enhance the illusion of movement and depth. Your choice of colors.
  • Create  an interesting background.
  • OUTLINE in SHARPIE  & COLOR with COLORED PENCILS!!!

shape sketchbook assignment

  • Draw your dream slice of pizza!
  • Think about what would be on it… What type of crust?  What type of cheese?   What type of toppings?    What shape would it be  (doesn’t have to be a triangle) ?  Breakfast pizza? Dessert pizza…Sure!
  • *WRITE  what is on it next to drawing!
  • YOU  NEED  TO COLOR IT REALISTICALLY!!!
  • *USE COLORED PENCILS! ( NO SHARPIE  on pizza slice)

Sign in | Recent Site Activity | Report Abuse | Print Page | Powered By Google Sites

shape sketchbook assignment

Qualitative variables are those with no natural or logical order. While scientists often assign a number to each, these numbers are not meaningful in any way. Examples of qualitative variables include things such as color, shape or pattern.

According to Purdue University’s website, the abbreviation for the word “assignment” is ASSG. This is listed as a standard abbreviation within the field of information technology.

In real property transactions, a deed of assignment is a legal document that transfers the interest of the owner of that interest to the person to whom it is assigned, the assignee. When ownership is transferred, the deed of assignment show...

Experiment with color, shape, line and texture. These paintings should be

Drawing&Painting: Sketchbook Assignment 5, Due Friday 10/21. The Elements of art: Line, Shape, Space, Texture, Form, Color and Value. Fill four pages with

SHAPE DRAWING – Draw an object, a person, or a landscape using only straight lines and geometric shapes. You may use rulers, compasses, and triangles to

Consider what types of shapes, lines, colors etc. represent you. Sketch 3 ideas. In the 4th sketch apply the logo and show how you would use it in either a

a black and white drawing of an abstract pattern with words in the shape of wavy ... Sketchbook Assignments · Types Of Lines · Index Page.

Sketch- do any preliminary sketching to practice shapes, composition etc. Make Sure all sides of your page are crossed over with a part of the drawing, a leaf

Open App. Shape Sketchbook Assignment. 496 views · 3 years ago ...more. Try YouTube Kids. An app made just for kids. Open app · Leah Walsh. 33.

Use the light sources to accurately shade the 4 shapes on the bottom of the page (ball, dice, bucket, & hat). Also draw and shade the cast shadow of each object

Oct 17, 2015 - Explore Amanda Nadig's board "Sketchbook Outside Assignments: Homework", followed by 103 people on Pinterest. See more ideas about sketch

Use overlapping to break up the spaces into interesting positive and negative shapes. Outline with a felt-tipped pen/Sharpie. Erase pencil lines! Think up an

Fill the shape in with something interesting and unpredicable! Page 40. Create a "figure" by juxtaposing different creatures top of the head- eyes- nose

Question and Answer forum for K12 Students

Essay Writing Topics For Class 6

Essay Writing Topics For Class 6 Format, Examples, Topics, Exercises

Essay writing topics for class 6 in english.

Writing essays is a crucial part of the academic curriculum for students of all ages. As students progress through their academic journey, the complexity and length of essays increase. Class 6 students are typically expected to write essays that are between 500 and 1000 words long. The essays are usually written in a five-paragraph format and include an introduction, three body paragraphs, and a conclusion. In this article, we will discuss some essay writing topics for class 6 students, along with the English Grammar , format, and examples.

Also Read: Essay Writing For Class 8

Format Of Class 6 Essays:

Before we start discussing the essay topics, let’s take a look at the format of class 6 essays.

Introduction:

The introduction should be a brief paragraph that provides an overview of the topic. It should include a thesis statement that tells the reader what the essay is about.

Body Paragraphs:

The body paragraphs should be three in number, and each paragraph should focus on a specific idea related to the topic. Each paragraph should have a topic sentence that introduces the idea and supporting details that explain and support the topic sentence.

Conclusion:

The conclusion should be a summary of the main points discussed in the essay. It should restate the thesis statement and provide a final thought on the topic.

Essay Writing Topics For Class 6:

1. My Favorite Season 2. My Favorite Animal 3. My Best Friend 4. My Favorite Sport 5. My Favorite Food 6. My School Life 7. My Family 8. The Importance of Reading 9. My Favorite Movie 10. My Favorite Book 11. My Hobby 12. My Role Model 13. The Importance of Discipline 14. My Dreams and Aspirations 15. The Importance of Education 16. My Favorite Holiday 17. My Favorite Teacher 18. My Favorite Place 19. My Favorite Subject 20. My Favorite Color

Examples Of Essay Writing Topics For Class 6:

1. My Favorite Season:

My favorite season is winter. I love the cold weather, and I get excited when the first snowfall arrives. I enjoy making snowmen and having snowball fights with my friends. I also love the holidays that come during winter, such as Christmas and New Year’s. During winter break, my family and I like to go skiing, and we have a lot of fun together.

2. My Best Friend:

My best friend’s name is Sarah. We have been friends since kindergarten, and we have a lot in common. We both love animals and enjoy playing video games together. We also enjoy playing soccer and often compete against each other. Sarah is always there for me when I need her, and I feel lucky to have her as my best friend.

3. The Importance of Reading:

Reading is very important because it helps improve our vocabulary and comprehension skills. It also stimulates our imagination and creativity. By reading, we can learn about different cultures and explore new ideas. Reading is also a great way to relax and escape from our daily stresses.

Recommended Reading: Essay Writing Topics For Class 6

Conclusion On Essay Writing Topics For Class 6:

Writing essays is an essential skill for students to develop, and by practicing writing on different topics, students can become better writers. The above essay topics can be a starting point for class 6 students, and by following the essay format, they can write well-structured essays that effectively communicate their ideas.

IMAGES

  1. Photo Essay Rules [Examples for Students]

    photo essay example for grade 6

  2. 018 Essay Example 6th Grade Examples Persuasive Writings And Essays

    photo essay example for grade 6

  3. 6th Grade Reflective Essay Sample

    photo essay example for grade 6

  4. Photo Essay

    photo essay example for grade 6

  5. 006 6th Grade Essay Example ~ Thatsnotus

    photo essay example for grade 6

  6. 💋 Grade 6 essay examples. A List Of Great Persuasive Essay Topics For 6

    photo essay example for grade 6

VIDEO

  1. how to write a paragraph about my favorite vacation

  2. How To Write A Grade 9 Point For Your Paragraph, Every Single Time

  3. GRADE 10: COMPOUND INTEREST. #learning #maths #viral

  4. Essay writing I The best essay writing

  5. Grade 10

  6. CLASS 8TH PARAGRAPH IMAGE OBSERVATION WRITING P4

COMMENTS

  1. Photo Essay

    1. Introduction or Lead Photo: The first photo serves as an introduction, capturing attention and setting the tone for the narrative. 2. Scene-setting Shots: Establish the context and location through images that provide an overview of the environment or situation. 3. Detail Shots:

  2. 18 Immersive Photo Essay Examples & Tips

    1. Protests View the "Resistance" photo essay by David Moore. A great idea for photo essays for students is to shoot the protest to show its power. You can capture people with signs and banners to demonstrate what they are standing for. Besides, you can learn how to capture moving subjects.

  3. How to Create a Photo Essay: Step-by-Step Guide With Examples

    How to Create a Photo Essay: Step-by-Step Guide With Examples Written by MasterClass Last updated: Jun 7, 2021 • 5 min read Photo essays tell a story in pictures, and there are many different ways to style your own photo essay.

  4. 17 Awesome Photo Essay Examples You Should Try Yourself

    16. Transformation Photo Essays Transformation is one of the most used photo essay topics. It is a great way to show change. The change can be slow, such as a woman going through pregnancy, or watching a baby turn into a toddler and beyond. As a photo essay project, this doesn't even need to be about people.

  5. Pictures That Tell Stories: Photo Essay Examples

    Become the photographer you were born to be. Join Cole's Classroom Famous Photo Essays "The Great Depression" by Dorothea Lange - Shot and arranged in the 1930s, this famous photo essay still serves as a stark reminder of The Great Depression and Dust Bowl America.

  6. Teaching the Photo Essay Free Lesson Guide

    Teaching the Photo Essay. A picture is worth 1,000 words. By We Are Teachers Staff. Sep 2, 2015. Your students, if they're anything like mine, love to communicate through images—photos on Instagram, GIFs shared in a text, photo stories on Snapchat. And yet, so much of our conversation in school revolves around words.

  7. 33 Writing Photo Essays

    33 Writing Photo Essays Page 170 from Write on Track Start-Up Activity Share appropriate magazines that include photos and text, such as National Geographic or Life. Have students page through the magazines, looking for photos that draw their attention. Ask what they like about the photos. Ask what they can learn from the photos.

  8. PDF Storytelling with Photographs: How to Create a Photo Essay

    Planning Your Photo Essay 1. Choose 2. Research 3. Clarify 4. Plan 5. Planning Your Shots 1. The lead photo 2. A scene-setting shot (also known as an 'establishing shot') 3. Sequential shots 4. Portraits 5. Panoramic shots 6. Interactive shots 7. Detail shots 8. Summing-up shot 9. Concluding shot 6. Editing Your Photo Essay 1. The first edit 2.

  9. What is a Photo Essay? 9 Photo Essay Examples You Can Recreate

    August 22, 2022 A photo essay is a series of photographs that tell a story. Unlike a written essay, a photo essay focuses on visuals instead of words. With a photo essay, you can stretch your creative limits and explore new ways to connect with your audience.

  10. How to Create an Engaging Photo Essay (+ Examples)

    A great way to become a better photographer and improve your storytelling skills is by studying the work of others. You can go to art shows, review books and magazines and look at the winners in photo contests - most of the time, there's a category for photo series. 6. Get a wide variety of photos.

  11. 23 Photo Essay Ideas and Examples (to Get Your Creative Juices Flowing!)

    Here are some handy essay ideas and examples for inspiration! 1. A day in the life. Your first photo essay idea is simple: Track a life over the course of one day. You might make an essay about someone else's life. Or the life of a location, such as the sidewalk outside your house.

  12. Photo Essay: Structure, Ideas, and Examples for Creating the Best

    Step 4 - Select your top images. Define the appropriate number of images that you intend to use when telling the story. For example, if you intend to leave the audience under suspense, choose which images to use and their order of appearance. Your photo essay project does not have to use all your images but the best.

  13. How to Create a Photo Essay in 9 Steps (with Examples)

    Updated: January 29, 2024 Read Time: 11 minutes Gather up a handful of images that seem to go together, and voila! It's a photo essay, right? Well… no. Though, this is a common misconception. In reality, a photo essay is much more thoughtful and structured than that.

  14. How to Make a Photo Essay (with Pictures)

    Use images that build in intensity or draw the viewers further into the essay. 5. Ask for feedback. Once you have the images you like in an order you think tells the story, ask a friend or fellow photographer to take a look. Don't tell them what the purpose of the essay is or provide them with any of the text.

  15. How to Make a Photo Essay: 5 Tips for Impactful Results

    1. Find a topic you care about. Every good photo essay should start with an idea. Otherwise, you'll be shooting without a purpose - and while such an approach may eventually lead to an interesting series of photos, it's far, far easier to begin with a topic and only then take out your camera. As I emphasized above, a photo essay can be ...

  16. 32 Photo Essay Examples (Plus Tips)

    32 Photo Essay Examples (Plus Tips) Photography is a medium that allows you to explore narratives and tell stories about the world around you. One form of storytelling is the photo essay. If you want to create your own photo essay, it can help to know the two main types of essays and some examples of potential subjects. In this article, we ...

  17. 'Where We Are': A Photo Essay Contest for Exploring Community

    Use these resources to help you create your photo essay: A related Student Opinion question to help you brainstorm ideas before you begin taking photos.. A step-by-step guide that uses examples ...

  18. Picturing a Story: Photo Essay about a Community, Event or Issue

    • Students will discuss and analyze examples of social-documentary photographs by Dorothea Lange. ... The photo essay was popularized by Lange and other photographers during the 1930s. ... Grade 6 Artistic Perception 1.2-Discuss works of art as to theme, genre, style, idea, and differences in media. ...

  19. Grade 6 Arts Module: Basic Photography • DepEd Tambayan

    1. Realizes that art processes, elements and principles still apply even with the use of technologies. 2. Understands concepts and principles of photography. 3. Identifies the parts and functions of the camera (point and shoot or phone camera). 4. Applies composition skills to produce a printed photograph for a simple photo essay.

  20. Picture Description: Examples. Grade 6. Level A2

    Picture Description: Examples. Grade 6. Level A2 This photo shows a short brick wall, the bricks looks new because they're clean but they're scratched. The bricks are red with white colors. Next to the wall on the left there is a fence , same on the right side. The fence is made of wire and wood.

  21. Photo Essay worksheet

    Photo Essay MARIVIC D. CRISOSTOMO Member for 2 years 10 months Age: 10-12 Level: Grade 6 Language: English (en) ID: 931504 21/04/2021 Country code: PH Country: Philippines School subject: Arts (1061030) Main content: Applies composition skills to produce a printed photograph for a simple photo es (1353149)

  22. Essays in 6th Grade: A Basic Format that Elevates the Standard 5

    Megan Mariano Mar 24, 2021 5 min read Essays in 6th Grade: A Basic Format that Elevates the Standard 5-Paragraph Structure 6th grade is such a funny year. Funny haha and funny weird. Student writing levels are all over the map.

  23. photo essay example for grade 6

    Ideas, Inspiration, and Giveaways for Teachers. We Are Teachers. Teaching the Photo Essay. A picture is worth 1,000 words. Your students, if they're anything like mine, love to

  24. Essay Writing Topics For Class 6 Format, Examples, Topics, Exercises

    Essay Writing Topics For Class 6: 1. My Favorite Season 2. My Favorite Animal 3. My Best Friend 4. My Favorite Sport 5. My Favorite Food 6. My School Life 7. My Family 8. The Importance of Reading 9. My Favorite Movie

  25. What records are exempted from FERPA?

    Records which are kept in the sole possession of the maker of the records, are used only as a personal memory aid, and are not accessible or revealed to any other person except a temporary substitute for the maker of the records.