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How to Write a Research Proposal | Examples & Templates

Published on October 12, 2022 by Shona McCombes and Tegan George. Revised on November 21, 2023.

Structure of a research proposal

A research proposal describes what you will investigate, why it’s important, and how you will conduct your research.

The format of a research proposal varies between fields, but most proposals will contain at least these elements:

Introduction

Literature review.

  • Research design

Reference list

While the sections may vary, the overall objective is always the same. A research proposal serves as a blueprint and guide for your research plan, helping you get organized and feel confident in the path forward you choose to take.

Table of contents

Research proposal purpose, research proposal examples, research design and methods, contribution to knowledge, research schedule, other interesting articles, frequently asked questions about research proposals.

Academics often have to write research proposals to get funding for their projects. As a student, you might have to write a research proposal as part of a grad school application , or prior to starting your thesis or dissertation .

In addition to helping you figure out what your research can look like, a proposal can also serve to demonstrate why your project is worth pursuing to a funder, educational institution, or supervisor.

Research proposal length

The length of a research proposal can vary quite a bit. A bachelor’s or master’s thesis proposal can be just a few pages, while proposals for PhD dissertations or research funding are usually much longer and more detailed. Your supervisor can help you determine the best length for your work.

One trick to get started is to think of your proposal’s structure as a shorter version of your thesis or dissertation , only without the results , conclusion and discussion sections.

Download our research proposal template

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proposal for essay example

Writing a research proposal can be quite challenging, but a good starting point could be to look at some examples. We’ve included a few for you below.

  • Example research proposal #1: “A Conceptual Framework for Scheduling Constraint Management”
  • Example research proposal #2: “Medical Students as Mediators of Change in Tobacco Use”

Like your dissertation or thesis, the proposal will usually have a title page that includes:

  • The proposed title of your project
  • Your supervisor’s name
  • Your institution and department

The first part of your proposal is the initial pitch for your project. Make sure it succinctly explains what you want to do and why.

Your introduction should:

  • Introduce your topic
  • Give necessary background and context
  • Outline your  problem statement  and research questions

To guide your introduction , include information about:

  • Who could have an interest in the topic (e.g., scientists, policymakers)
  • How much is already known about the topic
  • What is missing from this current knowledge
  • What new insights your research will contribute
  • Why you believe this research is worth doing

As you get started, it’s important to demonstrate that you’re familiar with the most important research on your topic. A strong literature review  shows your reader that your project has a solid foundation in existing knowledge or theory. It also shows that you’re not simply repeating what other people have already done or said, but rather using existing research as a jumping-off point for your own.

In this section, share exactly how your project will contribute to ongoing conversations in the field by:

  • Comparing and contrasting the main theories, methods, and debates
  • Examining the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches
  • Explaining how will you build on, challenge, or synthesize prior scholarship

Following the literature review, restate your main  objectives . This brings the focus back to your own project. Next, your research design or methodology section will describe your overall approach, and the practical steps you will take to answer your research questions.

To finish your proposal on a strong note, explore the potential implications of your research for your field. Emphasize again what you aim to contribute and why it matters.

For example, your results might have implications for:

  • Improving best practices
  • Informing policymaking decisions
  • Strengthening a theory or model
  • Challenging popular or scientific beliefs
  • Creating a basis for future research

Last but not least, your research proposal must include correct citations for every source you have used, compiled in a reference list . To create citations quickly and easily, you can use our free APA citation generator .

Some institutions or funders require a detailed timeline of the project, asking you to forecast what you will do at each stage and how long it may take. While not always required, be sure to check the requirements of your project.

Here’s an example schedule to help you get started. You can also download a template at the button below.

Download our research schedule template

If you are applying for research funding, chances are you will have to include a detailed budget. This shows your estimates of how much each part of your project will cost.

Make sure to check what type of costs the funding body will agree to cover. For each item, include:

  • Cost : exactly how much money do you need?
  • Justification : why is this cost necessary to complete the research?
  • Source : how did you calculate the amount?

To determine your budget, think about:

  • Travel costs : do you need to go somewhere to collect your data? How will you get there, and how much time will you need? What will you do there (e.g., interviews, archival research)?
  • Materials : do you need access to any tools or technologies?
  • Help : do you need to hire any research assistants for the project? What will they do, and how much will you pay them?

If you want to know more about the research process , methodology , research bias , or statistics , make sure to check out some of our other articles with explanations and examples.

Methodology

  • Sampling methods
  • Simple random sampling
  • Stratified sampling
  • Cluster sampling
  • Likert scales
  • Reproducibility

 Statistics

  • Null hypothesis
  • Statistical power
  • Probability distribution
  • Effect size
  • Poisson distribution

Research bias

  • Optimism bias
  • Cognitive bias
  • Implicit bias
  • Hawthorne effect
  • Anchoring bias
  • Explicit bias

Once you’ve decided on your research objectives , you need to explain them in your paper, at the end of your problem statement .

Keep your research objectives clear and concise, and use appropriate verbs to accurately convey the work that you will carry out for each one.

I will compare …

A research aim is a broad statement indicating the general purpose of your research project. It should appear in your introduction at the end of your problem statement , before your research objectives.

Research objectives are more specific than your research aim. They indicate the specific ways you’ll address the overarching aim.

A PhD, which is short for philosophiae doctor (doctor of philosophy in Latin), is the highest university degree that can be obtained. In a PhD, students spend 3–5 years writing a dissertation , which aims to make a significant, original contribution to current knowledge.

A PhD is intended to prepare students for a career as a researcher, whether that be in academia, the public sector, or the private sector.

A master’s is a 1- or 2-year graduate degree that can prepare you for a variety of careers.

All master’s involve graduate-level coursework. Some are research-intensive and intend to prepare students for further study in a PhD; these usually require their students to write a master’s thesis . Others focus on professional training for a specific career.

Critical thinking refers to the ability to evaluate information and to be aware of biases or assumptions, including your own.

Like information literacy , it involves evaluating arguments, identifying and solving problems in an objective and systematic way, and clearly communicating your ideas.

The best way to remember the difference between a research plan and a research proposal is that they have fundamentally different audiences. A research plan helps you, the researcher, organize your thoughts. On the other hand, a dissertation proposal or research proposal aims to convince others (e.g., a supervisor, a funding body, or a dissertation committee) that your research topic is relevant and worthy of being conducted.

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Jun 21, 2023

Proposal Essay Examples: Convincing Ideas for Your Research Paper or Essay

Dive into the power of persuasive writing through captivating proposal essay examples. Explore ideas that inspire, enrich your work, and unlock impactful proposal crafting. Prepare to elevate your writing and leave a lasting impression!

Writing a compelling proposal essay often presents a challenge for many students. A large proportion can't distinguish a research paper proposal from a proposal essay, and even more find difficulty in creating persuasive ideas for their essays. If this situation resonates with you, rest assured you're not alone.

In this extensive guide, we aim to simplify the process of writing a proposal essay. We provide a host of resources such as examples of proposal essays, a carefully constructed outline template, and proven writing techniques. Our guide, honed through years of experience in academic writing, is specifically designed to help you achieve high grades in your proposal essay assignment.

Embark on this journey with us to uncover the nuances of crafting an excellent proposal essay. Armed with the correct resources and guidance, you will transition from uncertainty to confidence, ready to produce an impressive proposal essay. Let's start delving into the craft of writing an engaging proposal essay.

What is a Proposal Essay?

An essay proposal is a document that outlines the content and purpose of your proposed essay. Whereas a thesis conveys the central concept of your study, an essay proposal summarizes the intent and substance of a specific essay.

A proposal essay also serves as a detailed plan of action addressing a particular problem. The writer identifies a problem, suggests a solution, and provides evidence to persuade the reader to agree with the proposed solution or idea. In essence, your role as a writer is to convince the reader that your concept is exceptional and that they should support its execution.

These essays function as a strategic tool, enabling you to sell an idea, belief, or yourself in a manner that not only piques the reader's interest but also convinces them of your capability to bring the proposed plan to fruition. Although proposal essays are frequently associated with business and economics disciplines, they extend beyond these fields.

Proposal essays fundamentally promote critical thinking and problem-solving skills among students. They allow you to venture beyond the structured academic syllabus and engage with real-world issues that require innovative solutions. Writing a proposal essay, therefore, is an opportunity to demonstrate your analytical acumen and your capacity to think creatively.

How to Write a Proposal Essay

Writing a compelling proposal essay requires careful planning, thorough research, and meticulous execution. Here are the steps to ensure your proposal essay stands out:

1. Understand Your Audience: Begin by identifying your target audience. Who are they, and what is their role in the context of your proposal? What are their needs, concerns, or interests? Understanding your audience's perspectives helps in tailoring your message, increasing the chances of your proposal being accepted.

2. Research Thoroughly: Deep and broad research is crucial. Even if you're well-versed with the topic, there is always more to learn. Look at what experts in the field have said and how your proposal aligns or diverges from their views. This research will not only fortify your arguments but also make your essay more credible and authoritative.

3. Create a Detailed Plan: Once you've completed your research, start to structure your essay. Begin with an introduction where you present the problem or issue. Then, propose your solution in the body paragraphs, where each paragraph should focus on a single point or argument, supported by evidence. Finally, wrap up your proposal in the conclusion by summarizing your key points and reinforcing the significance of your solution.

4. Write Your First Draft: Start writing your essay based on the plan you have created. Be clear and concise, avoid jargon, and make sure your arguments are logically constructed and easy to follow.

5. Revise and Edit: After completing your first draft, it's important to revisit it with a critical eye. Look for areas where your argument can be strengthened, check for coherence and flow, correct grammatical errors, and ensure your language is clear and precise. It may be helpful to have others review your work for a fresh perspective.

6. Proofread: Once you're satisfied with the content of your essay, proofread it one final time to catch any minor mistakes or inconsistencies. Remember, a polished essay demonstrates your diligence and commitment to quality.

By following these steps, you can create a persuasive, well-structured proposal essay that effectively communicates your idea and its value.

Structure of a Proposal Essay

Writing a proposal essay requires a specific structure that enables you to present your idea clearly and persuasively. Here's an overview of the necessary elements:

1. Introduction: Your introduction sets the stage for your proposal. It should include a captivating hook that draws readers in, and a clear thesis statement that summarizes your proposal. For Example: A feasible approach to decreasing the alarming mortality rate among young mothers is by equipping parents with necessary skills to support their teenage daughters who become pregnant.

2. Problem Statement: After the introduction, delve deeper into the problem your proposal aims to solve. Describe its nature, roots, and implications. Clarify why it's critical to address this problem, how it affects your readers, and what benefits solving it would bring.

3. Proposal Statement: In this section, elucidate your proposal in detail. Describe the solution you've come up with, highlighting both its benefits and potential drawbacks. Ensure you present your idea as the optimal solution to the problem at hand.

4. Implementation Plan: Next, explain how you plan to execute your proposal. This should be a clear and comprehensive guide demonstrating the practicability of your solution. Identify potential obstacles that might arise during implementation and include steps to overcome them. Discuss why your approach is unique and why previous attempts to solve the problem have failed.

5. Expected Outcome: Here, discuss the positive results you expect from the implementation of your proposal. Provide a clear, concise picture of the improvements and advantages your solution will bring. 6. Evaluation: In this section, provide an estimate of the resources, including time, money, and expertise, necessary to implement your proposal. Discuss its feasibility within the current situation and address possible objections or criticisms from those who might disagree with your proposal.

7. Timeline and Required Resources: Clearly specify the resources required to implement your proposal, such as manpower, funds, and equipment. Include a timeline if possible, giving a chronological order of the steps to be taken.

8. Conclusion: Summarize the key points of your essay and reaffirm the significance of your proposal. This is your final opportunity to convince your readers, so end with a powerful call to action.

Avoid introducing new ideas in the conclusion, as it can confuse readers and may unnecessarily elongate your essay. Stick to wrapping up what you've already presented and reemphasizing its importance.

Proposal Essay Examples 

In the following section, we present a collection of Proposal Essay Examples. These essays serve as excellent references for those looking to understand the structure and content of a compelling proposal.

 Each one addresses a unique and important topic, provides an insightful problem statement, proposes thoughtful solutions, and concludes by summarizing the main points. These examples illustrate the effective strategies used in proposal writing to engage readers and convincingly present an argument. 

Let's delve into these intriguing examples to inspire and enhance your proposal writing skills.

1. Reducing Plastic Waste: A Proposal for Action

Introduction:

With the escalating global environmental crisis, the specter of plastic waste looms large. Forecasts from the United Nations indicate that, failing to reduce plastic waste, we'll have more plastic than fish in the oceans by 2050. This proposal aims to present tangible solutions to this predicament.

Problem Statement:

The unchecked production and disposal of plastic products significantly contribute to plastic waste, endangering the environment and marine life. Given the lifespan of plastic waste—lasting centuries—it's crucial to devise an effective solution to curb plastic production.

Suggested measures to combat plastic waste include:

Government-imposed ban on single-use plastic items, such as straws, cups, and cutlery.

Government incentives encouraging the use of reusable products.

Awareness campaigns conducted by the government and NGOs about the environmental impact of plastic waste.

Investments in improved waste management systems for the proper handling of plastic waste.

Conclusion:

Reducing plastic waste is an urgent priority. By implementing the proposed measures, we can alleviate the issue, protect our environment and marine life, and build a more sustainable future.

2. Dangers of Texting While Driving

Despite countless warnings and campaigns, texting while driving remains a widespread, dangerous habit. This essay investigates the perils of this behavior and proposes measures to mitigate it.

Texting while driving constitutes a severe distraction, often leading to road accidents. Studies even rank it as more dangerous than drunk driving, as it considerably delays a driver's reaction time.

To address this peril, the following steps are suggested:

Launching educational programs and campaigns to inform drivers about the risks of texting while driving.

Implementing stricter penalties for drivers caught in the act.

Promoting technologies that restrict texting while driving.

Texting while driving is a lethal habit that warrants immediate attention. By raising awareness, enforcing stricter rules, and employing technology, we can significantly cut down road accidents due to distracted driving.

3. The Causes of Homelessness

Homelessness, affecting millions worldwide, is a complex and pressing social issue. This essay explores the causes behind homelessness and suggests viable solutions.

Causes of Homelessness:

Poverty, mental illness, addiction, and family breakdowns constitute the four primary triggers of homelessness.

To alleviate homelessness, the following steps are suggested:

Stimulate the supply of affordable housing by offering financial incentives to developers and reducing zoning restrictions.

Facilitate access to mental health services, addiction treatment, and support services for individuals and families experiencing homelessness.

Alleviate poverty by raising the minimum wage, providing job training, and enhancing access to education and healthcare.

Addressing homelessness calls for a comprehensive and coordinated effort. By implementing the proposed measures, we can significantly reduce homelessness, emphasizing our collective responsibility to extend support to those grappling with this issue.

Final Words

In conclusion, crafting a persuasive proposal essay involves thoughtful planning, in-depth research, and adept writing techniques. With Jenni.ai's cutting-edge AI tools at your disposal, this process becomes simpler, enabling you to create standout proposal essays. Take this opportunity to enhance your writing skills and leave an enduring impression on your audience. Experience the transformative capabilities of Jenni.ai today!

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Home — Essay Types — Proposal Essay

Proposal Essay Examples

Exploring proposal essay topics opens up a realm of possibilities for addressing various issues and challenges, ranging from practical business plans to cutting-edge engineering solutions. These topics serve as the foundation for constructing well-reasoned proposals, demonstrating the thoughtfulness and ingenuity of the writer. Whether you are delving into Economics, Business Management, Engineering, or any other field, proposal essay topics provide the canvas upon which your innovative ideas can be sketched and evaluated.

Proposal Essay Ideas and Topics

The realm of proposal essays is vast and encompasses a multitude of ideas and topics across various disciplines. Here are a few proposal essay ideas and topics, along with some proposal essay examples, to inspire your own academic exploration:

  • Environmental Sustainability: Propose initiatives to combat climate change and promote sustainable practices in urban areas.
  • Education Reform: Offer innovative solutions to enhance the quality of primary and secondary education, addressing challenges such as remote learning and educational inequality.
  • Healthcare Access: Propose policies to improve access to healthcare services, especially in underserved communities.
  • Business Strategies: Suggest strategies for small businesses to thrive in the digital age, adapting to evolving market trends and consumer behaviors.
  • Technological Advancements: Explore proposals for ethical and sustainable technological advancements, focusing on areas like renewable energy sources or artificial intelligence ethics.

Proposal Argument Essay Topics

Proposal argument essay topics encompass a wide range of issues and ideas that can be explored and debated. These topics typically revolve around proposing a solution or course of action to address a specific problem or challenge. Here are some proposal argument essay topics to consider:

  • Implementing Stricter Gun Control Laws to Reduce Gun Violence
  • Promoting Sustainable Agriculture and Reducing Food Waste
  • Reforming the Criminal Justice System to Focus on Rehabilitation
  • Addressing the Student Loan Debt Crisis with Debt Forgiveness Programs
  • Combating Climate Change through Renewable Energy Initiatives
  • Improving Mental Health Support and Services in Schools
  • Implementing Universal Healthcare to Ensure Access for All
  • Promoting Gender Equality in the Workplace through Pay Equity Measures
  • Enhancing Cybersecurity Measures to Protect Personal Data
  • Combating Childhood Obesity through Healthier School Lunch Programs

When considering a topic for your proposal argument essay, it's essential to choose one that aligns with your interests and allows you to present persuasive arguments supported by compelling evidence and reasoning.

Topic Proposal Essay Example

You might explore the benefits of implementing community policing programs as a solution to improve trust, transparency, and cooperation between the police and the community—a topic proposal essay example that addresses real-world issues and proposes practical solutions for positive change.

These proposal argument essay topics cover a wide range of social, political, environmental, and economic issues, providing ample opportunities for in-depth research and critical analysis. Select a topic that resonates with your passion and enables you to construct a convincing argument for your proposed solution.

In conclusion, a proposal essay is a valuable genre of academic writing that allows students to delve into critical issues, propose solutions, and support their ideas with sound research and evidence. It serves as a platform for innovative thinking and problem-solving across various academic disciplines.

What is a Proposal Essay

A proposal essay is a type of academic writing where the author presents a problem and proposes a solution or course of action to address that problem. This type of essay is often assigned in college courses, and its primary goal is to persuade the reader or audience that the proposed solution is viable, effective, and well-reasoned. To better understand how to craft a proposal essay, it can be helpful to explore proposal essay examples , which you can find on our essays base.

Proposal essays can cover a wide range of topics, from social and environmental issues to business and policy proposals. They are a valuable exercise in critical thinking, research, and persuasive writing, as they require the author to analyze a problem, develop a well-considered solution, and present it convincingly to an audience. These essays are commonly assigned in college courses to assess students’ ability to think critically and propose practical solutions to real-world problems.

How to Write Proposal Essay and Tips for Success

Navigating the world of proposal essays can be a daunting task, especially when faced with a vast array of potential topics. The key to success lies in understanding how to craft a proposal essay that not only captures the attention of your professor and audience but also persuades them to take action. When writing a proposal essay , consider these essential steps and tips to create a compelling and persuasive piece of academic writing.

Much like a research outline, a proposal essay delves into an event or argument, providing compelling reasons for why a particular action should be taken or why a certain social event may not be beneficial. The structure of your proposal will largely depend on your chosen topic and objectives. For instance, financial reports may necessitate the inclusion of statistical data, while fashion studies may require a different approach to essay writing. When learning how to write a proposal essay , it’s crucial to tailor your approach to your specific subject matter. The overarching goal is to present a clear and convincing piece of evidence right from the introduction.

By incorporating insights and exploring proposal essay examples , you can confidently craft compelling proposals that leave a lasting impact.

How to Write Proposal Essay Introduction

The introduction of a proposal essay plays a crucial role in engaging the reader and setting the stage for the proposal’s main arguments. It typically begins with a hook or attention-grabbing statement to draw the reader in. Here’s a proposal essay introduction example :

“Imagine a community where families struggle to put food on the table, where children go to bed hungry each night. This is the harsh reality faced by many residents in our town. In this proposal essay, we will address the pressing issue of food insecurity in our community and present a viable solution that can make a significant difference—the establishment of a community food bank. This proposal aims to not only alleviate hunger but also foster a sense of unity and support among our residents. In the following sections, we will explore the reasons behind food insecurity, the benefits of the proposed food bank, and the steps needed for its successful implementation.”

This introduction effectively grabs the reader’s attention by highlighting a pressing issue and presenting the proposed solution, setting the stage for the essay’s main arguments and supporting evidence.

Structuring Your Proposal Essay

At its core, a proposal essay is similar to a research outline, where you will discuss an event or argument and provide compelling reasons for why a particular action should be taken or why a certain social event may not be beneficial. The structure of your proposal will largely depend on your chosen topic and objectives. For instance, financial reports may necessitate the inclusion of statistical data, while fashion studies may require a different approach to essay writing. Regardless of the topic, the overarching goal is to present a clear and convincing piece of evidence right from the introduction.

  • Introduction with a hook sentence. 
  • Thesis statement . 
  • Three body paragraphs where you set your objectives by explaining your proposal with the statistical data, surveys, and other facts. 
  • Conclusion . It must be kept brief as you work on your topic. The major part should be taken from your proposal’s justification. 
  • A literature review.

To craft a proposal essay, consider these essential elements:

  • A captivating introduction : Grab the reader’s attention from the outset by highlighting the significance of your topic and why it warrants consideration.
  • A well-defined problem statement: Clearly articulate the issue or challenge that your proposal aims to address.
  • A compelling solution: Propose a well-thought-out solution to the identified problem, ensuring its feasibility and effectiveness.
  • Supporting evidence: Substantiate your proposal with relevant data, research findings, or expert opinions.
  • A persuasive conclusion: Reiterate the significance of your proposal and its potential impact, leaving a lasting impression on the reader.

7 Most Common Proposal Essay Mistakes to Avoid

Addressing these common mistakes will significantly improve the quality and effectiveness of your proposal essay.

Proposal Writing Mistakes

Examples of a Proposal Essays

To further enhance your understanding, let’s delve into a few examples of proposal essays :

  • Example 1 : Advocating for a Greener Campus

Propose the implementation of sustainable practices on campus, such as energy-efficient lighting, recycling programs, and composting initiatives.

  • Example 2: Addressing the Issue of Homelessness

Advocate for the establishment of a community shelter or propose a volunteer program to assist the homeless population.

  • Example 3 : Promoting Healthy Eating Habits

Suggest the introduction of healthier food options in school cafeterias or advocate for nutrition education programs.

Remember : Tailor your proposal essay to the specific requirements of your assignment and ensure it aligns with your chosen topic.

How to Write a Proposal Argument Essay

Writing a proposal argument essay involves a structured approach to presenting your ideas, arguments, and proposed solutions to a specific issue or problem. Here are the key steps to follow when learning how to write a proposal argument essay :

  • Choose a Relevant Topic
  • Research Extensively
  • Identify Your Audience
  • Craft a Strong Thesis Statement
  • Outline Your Essay
  • Write a Compelling Introduction
  • Present Your Arguments
  • Address Counterarguments
  • Propose Solutions
  • Conclude Effectively
  • Revise and Edit
  • Cite Sources
  • Seek Feedback

Remember that a well-written proposal argument essay presents a clear problem, provides compelling evidence, and offers practical solutions while considering the needs and perspectives of the audience.

Key Differences Between Proposal Argument Essays and Proposal Essays

The key difference between proposal argument essays and proposal essays is that proposal argument essays argue for why their proposal is the best one, while proposal essays do not. Proposal argument essays are also typically more persuasive than proposal essays.

Proposal argument essay examples :

  • An essay that proposes a new law to reduce gun violence.
  • An essay that proposes a new program to help homeless people find housing.
  • An essay that proposes a new marketing strategy for a business.

Proposal essay examples:

  • An essay that proposes a new curriculum for a school.
  • An essay that proposes a new event for a community.
  • An essay that proposes a new product or service for a company.

Which Type of Essay Should You Write?

The type of essay that you should write depends on your assignment and your audience. If you are writing an essay for a class, your professor will likely tell you which type of essay to write. If you are writing an essay for a professional audience, you should choose the type of essay that will be most effective in persuading your audience to support your proposal.

Both proposal argument essays and proposal essays can be effective ways to communicate your ideas and persuade others to support your cause. When choosing which type of essay to write, it is important to consider your assignment, your audience, and the purpose of your essay.

General Essay Proposal Examples

Proposal essay writing checklist.

Instead of offering a classic structure template that won’t relate to your course topic, you must follow our free checklist that will provide you with much better assistance as you compare your paper to what we have: 

  • Your objectives are included in the first sentence in the introduction. (It should also be reflected in your hook sentence and the title of your proposal.)
  • You provide a background of a problem in the introduction.
  • Your proposal has a brief literature review that will be used as the supporting data.
  • Your proposal essay explains why your objectives will be met. (It’s the heart of your proposal. Use an explanatory tone as you apply analysis.)
  • Your tone is persuading by turning to quotes and the evidence.
  • Your conclusion is brief and simply re-states your thesis ideas.

Take your time to explore various proposal essay examples to see how much scope you should use when discussing some argument. Keep your tone unbiased when you provide information that represents what’s being common sense. Refer to your course and talk things out with your academic advisor to ensure that your proposal essay’s theme has been fully understood.

Transforming Traditional Business: An Electronic Business Proposal

In today’s rapidly evolving digital landscape, businesses must adapt and embrace electronic business (e-business) strategies to remain competitive and thrive. This proposal outlines the key elements and benefits of implementing e-business practices and technologies within our organization, paving the way for a more efficient, customer-centric,…

Prioritizing Early Intervention for Children’s Mental Health

As the prevalence of mental health disorders continues to rise, it is essential to prioritize early intervention in addressing mental health issues in children. Mental health problems can have long-term consequences on a child’s emotional, social, and physical development, making early intervention crucial in preventing…

Opening a Coffee Shop in Downtown: A Comprehensive Business Proposal

The coffee culture has been booming in recent years, and it is no surprise that coffee shops are popping up everywhere. Downtown areas are a hub for businesses, and opening a coffee shop in a downtown area can be a great idea. A coffee shop…

Gun Control: An Essential Step in Reducing Gun Violence

Introduction Gun control is a topic that has been debated for decades in the United States. The issue is a complex one that involves balancing the right to bear arms with the need to protect public safety. In the wake of numerous mass shootings and…

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Community Service Project: Improving Education for Low-Income Families

Introduction Education is a fundamental right that every individual should have access to, yet many low-income families struggle to provide adequate education for their children. The purpose of this community service project proposal essay is to address this issue and provide a solution that will…

An Examination of Abortion and its Health Implications on Women

Introduction Abortion is a controversial issue that has remained a topic of heated debate in the United States and other parts of the world. It is a medical procedure that involves terminating a pregnancy before the fetus is viable. While some people believe that women…

Air Pollution: Causes, Effects, and Proposed Solutions

Air pollution is a significant global problem that affects the health of millions of people, damages the environment, and costs billions of dollars. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), outdoor air pollution causes around 4.2 million premature deaths worldwide every year. Moreover, air pollution…

A Proposed Policy for a Campus-Based Food Cooperative

College students face many challenges in their academic journeys, including time management, financial constraints, and mental health problems. One of the most significant challenges is the lack of access to affordable and healthy food options. Many college students, especially those from low-income backgrounds, struggle to…

A Tax on High-Calorie Foods: A Solution to the Global Obesity Epidemic

According to the World Health Organization, in 2016, more than 1.9 billion adults were overweight, of which around 650 million were obese. In the United States alone, more than 42% of the population is considered obese. This epidemic not only has significant health consequences but…

A Proposal Paper on Texting and Driving

Texting and driving refer to the practice of sending or reading text messages while operating a vehicle. This dangerous behavior has become increasingly prevalent, especially among young drivers, and has been shown to have severe consequences. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA),…

What is a proposal essay?

It is an idea with a list of facts that help the readers see why a particular suggestion is good or bad. The proposal essay topics are limitless. They can deal with education and propound the benefits of distance learning or turn to technology and research the woes of video games. Good proposal essay examples should provide evidence and a list of arguments.

How to write a proposal essay?

A good paper proposal example should include a brief explanation of why you have chosen the topic with a clear thesis statement. The key is to introduce your idea and explain why you think it matters. Check out our essay proposal example to see how it turns to trusted evidence and lists reliable references or similar research on the subject.

What is the primary purpose of a proposal essay?

The primary purpose of a proposal essay is to advocate for a specific idea, solution, or change and provide convincing arguments and evidence to persuade the reader of its feasibility and importance.

How should I choose a proposal essay topic?

Choose a proposal essay topic that you are passionate about and that addresses a real problem or issue. Consider topics that interest you and are relevant to your audience or community.

What is the difference between a proposal essay and a research paper?

While both involve research and writing, a proposal essay focuses on advocating for a specific idea or solution, whereas a research paper typically presents findings and analysis of existing research on a broader topic.

Are proposal essays used outside of academic settings?

Yes, proposal essays are used in various professional and real-world settings, such as business proposals, grant applications, and policy recommendations, in addition to academic assignments.

The most popular topics for Proposal Essay

  • Business Ethics
  • Teenage Pregnancy
  • Drunk Driving
  • Climate Change
  • Plastic Bags
  • Animal Testing
  • Illegal Immigration
  • Deforestation
  • Consumerism
  • Discrimination

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How to Write a Proposal Essay/Argument

How to write a proposal essay like a pro

It is common for students to be assigned to a proposal essay assignment. Although many can write it based on the essay prompt, 4 out of 10 students find it hard to complete a proposal argument essay. Out of the ten requests we receive requiring our experts to help write proposal essays, four students appear to be confused between a proposal essay and a research proposal.

Not anymore because in this article, our senior research proposal writers put together their wits and insights to help you understand how to write a high-quality and effective proposal essay. We also provide a succinct sample and outline to help you do so quickly. This is a cheat sheet to scoring the best grades because we have tips and tricks that will make you ace your proposal essay.

What is a proposal essay?

As the name suggests, a proposal essay or paper is a type of academic paper that proposes an idea by providing evidence intended to convince the reader why an idea is good or bad.

It is sometimes referred to as a proposal argument essay, written if there is a problem to fix or a change to be made.

For instance, instead of just arguing that cigarette smoking affects health, it would be prudent to make a good argument on why there is a need to reduce the number of teenagers who are becoming cigarette addicts.

Even though proposals are written in business, economics, and management fields, they are also written by students, scientists, and other professional domains.

A proposal essay:

  • Convinces the reader to adopt a given or proposes idea/change
  • Shows the mastery of the concepts in a given field
  • It makes a case for the implementation of an idea or change process
  • Confirms the feasibility, practicality, and applicability of a program, idea, or change

Things to do/know before beginning

The pre-writing stage is the most critical part as it defines how smooth the entire writing process would be. Before typing or penning down the first sentence or even sitting down to write your proposal, there are certain mandatory rituals that you need to observe.

Primarily referred to as the proposal essay planning stage, here are the five steps to take:

1. Profile your target audience

A proposal essay or proposal argument aims to convince your audience that an idea is feasible, relevant, and practical. It might also persuade the readers that an idea is not worth pursuing.

As such, you need to have a deep understanding of your target audience. Are they business people or academics? What is their level of knowledge of the issue? What do you want to inform them about and why? Will they buy your suggestion? What is the best approach?

Understanding and profiling your audience helps you set the scope and tone of the proposal essay. For instance, when writing for the management and business people, proposing an idea with financial benefits could win their trust and time. On the other hand, when writing for healthcare workers, presenting strategies to improve patient quality, healthcare workers� wellbeing, and access to care could be relevant.

When you understand the people, who will read your proposal, you can quickly structure it better to draw their attention right from the start.

You need to consider what you need the audience to understand from your proposal. As well, you have to provide them with some facts that will help in decision-making. It also helps to choose a preferred style that will impress the readers.

It is about knowing what you are writing for to make them acknowledge the gist of the proposal. In the academic contexts, the audience is a professor, teaching assistant, associate professor, or instructor/lecturer. In this case, stick to the proposal essay prompt.

2. Define your research problem

With the audience in mind, you need to show that you understand the problem. One way of doing so is to highlight or state your situation so that your audience know the idea in the proposal.

This stage helps you win the trust of the readers. It also enables you to create an impression that you are knowledgeable about the issues at hand. Support your arguments with facts, references, and credible views to establish your identity/ethos.

Where necessary, ensure that you clarify and offer enough proof. Make sure to state the problem and why you feel it needs to be solved. It is the same aspect that appears in the introduction of a problem-solution essay .

When writing your problem statement section, ask yourself:

  • What is the main issue? Use statistics, facts, and examples
  • Who is affected by the issue? Who are the stakeholders?
  • What has been done before?
  • Why are previous/conventional solutions not working?
  • Why will your innovative idea/solution works?
  • How urgent is the problem or solution required?
  • What are other researchers saying about the problem?

In sum, you need to prove that you have thoroughly researched and assessed the issue. Your problem statement must display your knowledge about the topic.

3. Research and gather sources

After outlining the problem, you now need to research how to solve it. Use secondary and primary sources to support your claims/proposal. As you persuade your readers, ensure that you report on what has worked and what has failed.

As you do so, ensure that your proposed solution is well-backed with evidence from credible and relevant scholarly literature.

As a rule of thumb, stick to research articles written five years ago unless otherwise instructed by the professor/instructor to use older sources.

4. Write your proposal outline

With the problem statement and the sources backing your proposal in place, it is now time to explain your answer.

You now have the problem, and you should strive to solve it. Before writing the proposal essay outline , ensure that you have read the request for proposal (RFP) prompt or template.

An outline helps you structure your proposal, find means of convincing difficult readers and coherently lay the sections. It also helps brainstorm excellent ideas and approaches then organizing them into a comprehensive and structured proposal format. We will present a sample outline later in this article.

5. Proceed to write the essay

After having the skeleton of your proposal, it is now time to write your first draft by filling in the various parts. Once you are done, revise the draft as much as possible or enlist for proofreading and editing before turning in the final draft.

Sections of a Proposal Essay/Argument

We have summarized the main parts of a proposal essay in this section. Note that the sections might differ depending on the preferred elements by your university or college. In this regard, some parts might be added or omitted. When writing, you can alter the body of your proposal to meet your needs.

1. Title Page

This is for you if you are wondering how to title your proposal essay. Like the dissertation, theses, or research papers, the proposal essay has a title page that includes:

  • The title of your proposal essay, e.g., Rethinking Recycling: Why Reusing Needs to Be User Friendly.
  • Your full official names
  • The name of your professor/instructor/lecturer
  • Name of your school and department

Depending on your college or university, or department, the title page could differ. There are also institutions with pre-written/designed title pages sent alongside the instructions. The bottom line is that you need to read the assignment prompt or the RFP file carefully.

2. Introduction

Your introduction is the entry point to your essay. Like any other essay introduction , the proposal essay introduction gives a brief background of the proposal. It introduces the subject to your audience (s).

As it is the most crucial section, it needs to be well written. You can begin it using a hook, mostly facts, statistics, or statements. It should also have a topic sentence that introduces the readers to a topic. Ensure that it has a relevant topic that entices the audience on why they should care about the particular topic.

The introduction then has a thesis statement that contains the proposal you are making for solving a problem. In a proposal essay, the thesis should clearly state the proposition . An example of a good thesis statement when writing a proposal essay on teenage pregnancy could sound like:

Although teenage pregnancy is considered a taboo topic, educating parents on how to take care of the teenage girls with pregnancy could reduce the high mortality rate of teen mothers.

If you were to write a proposal essay on childhood obesity, a good thesis statement could read:

Childhood obesity is a menace affecting society, creating public health pressure and needs to be solved through proper school-based health promotion activities that involve the parents.

Another example of a good thesis statement for a proposal essay on depression is:

Depression has claimed the lives of many people and needs to be addressed through multi-professional collaboration among teachers, healthcare workers, media core, governments, and employers.

Again, your thesis statement should highlight the problem and the solutions that you are proposing. It narrows down to knowing your audience so that your introduction emphasizes the benefits of the proposal to this specific audience.

4. Problem statement

Even though you have already stated the problem in your introduction paragraph, you need to expound on the problem. Explain why there is a need to solve the issue. Here, your aim is to invite the readers to understand the core of your proposal. State the aims of your proposal and declare the importance of the topic in this section.

The section helps you to assert the issue. The section defines and expounds on the specific issue, the sources, and the consequences.

You also need to highlight why the issue needs to be solved and how solving it impacts the reader. Instead of using moral principles or universal pleas to feelings, think of what is important to your reader.

5. Proposal/Statement of purpose

After broadly defining your problem in the first paragraph of the body of your proposal essay, you now need to state the purpose of the essay. The section is exclusively meant to discuss the proposal that you are making.

Take your time to explore the advantages and disadvantages of your proposed solutions, change, or ideas. It can be a few sentences long if it is a shorter proposal or a few paragraphs if it is a long proposal.

6. Action Plan

After highlighting the proposed solutions, changes, or ideas, it is now time to write the plan of action. Here your focus is on the implementation of the ideas or solutions.

You need to show the audience that the solutions or changes are practical, feasible, relevant, and desirable.

When writing this section, you need to convince the readers that your proposal is a good idea over other available option. Furthermore, you must provide a detailed explanation about the implementation of the solutions or changes. Ensure that you anticipate the potential barriers or challenges during the implementation phase because every proposal must highlight the challenges and how to overcome them.

As you do so, also look at the viability, relevance, practicality, and desirability of your proposal. Will it work? What has prevented past solutions from working? What is different about your proposal?

7. Desired Outcomes

As the name suggests, this is the section of the essay that you anticipate the outcomes of your proposal. It is your chance to make everything you have been writing about clear.

8. Evaluation

When writing the evaluation phase, you need to consider the cost and resource implications of your proposed idea or change. Is the idea feasible compared to what is there currently? As well, you need to include the contrary opinions of the dissenting voices over the proposed solutions. Assure the audience that despite the challenges, the proposed solution will work.

9. Resources Required and timeline

Explain the resources such as skills, finances, time, and equipment that are required to implement your change, solutions, or ideas.

10. Conclusion

Your conclusion needs to emphasize your proposal and leave your audience with a call to action. State your proposal, call to action, and why the audience must consider your suggestions.

Never include new information in your conclusion, as that would extend the word count as you try to expound on the new topic and further confuse your already settled/convinced audience.

11. Works cited/references/bibliography

Any academic paper, white paper, or professional paper must have citations. We use citations to avoid plagiarism by mentioning those we read their work while writing our own. Depending on your chosen format: APA, MLA, Harvard, or Chicago format, the title can be references, bibliography, or works cited. Works cited is exclusively for MLA, while references can be used for both APA and Harvard. In Chicago format, you will title the consulted resources as Bibliography. In Harvard format, you can use either references or a reference list. Remember, a bibliography includes all the relevant sources you read, even those not cited in the paper.

Sample Proposal Essay Paper (in image format)

Below is a proposal argumentative essay on climate change, focusing on recycling courtesy of Excelsior Online Writing Lab .

Note that the sections are not titled. However, the paragraphs have been organized around our suggested parts.

sample essay

Proposal Essay Structure: Video

Here is a video that explains the structure of a proposal argument

Final Words

Now that you�ve learnt how to write a proposal essay, you can conquer this type of assignment without a doubt. However, if you are stuck, you can hire an essay writer to write one for you.

Related Reading: Good persuasive speech topics.

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Here are some commonly asked questions about the process of writing a quality proposal essay or proposal argument. You can send your questions, and we will answer them to enlighten our readers.

What is the format for a proposal essay?

Here are the main parts of a proposal essay:

  • Introduction ( hook , background, thesis statement (proposal))
  • Problem statement
  • Statement of purpose/proposal declaration
  • Plan of action
  • Resources require
  • References/works cited

What makes a good proposal essay?

A good proposal essay proposes an idea and offers evidence or arguments to convince the readers about the goodness or badness of the idea. A good one:

  • Has all claims well-supported
  • It is organized into paragraphs
  • It does not have filler words
  • Uses relevant and recent credible/scholarly sources
  • Cites all the sources, especially quotes, to avoid plagiarism
  • Uses formal language to present ideas
  • Has well-balanced, coherent, clear, explained, and concise paragraphs
  • Every paragraph stick to an idea
  • Has a thesis statement that stands out
  • Begins with a good hook

How do you write a proposal essay?

Here are the steps that are taken to write one:

  • Read the proposal prompt
  • Select a good topic or area that interests you
  • Research on the issue you want to solve
  • Write an outline for your proposal
  • Write the first draft of your proposal
  • Polish, edit, and re-read your proposal
  • Submit the proposal essay through Canvas, Turnitin, SafeAssign, DropBox, or any platform as suggested by the instructor
  • Enjoy your grades

Is the proposal essay similar to the research proposal paper?

No. while a proposal essay leaves the audience with a call to action, a research proposal paper highlights the strategies and steps a researcher will take to conduct research, just like a thesis and dissertation proposal. A proposal essay tackles an issue by suggesting change, ideas, or solutions based on the available information from scholarly literature.

It ends with the audience making the decision. On the other hand, a research proposal ends with the researcher conducting a study followed by writing a final research paper, term paper, dissertation, or thesis that details recommendations, suggestions, and conclusions.

What are the topics for proposal essays?

Suppose you need a good proposal essay topic; you need to think of areas such as healthcare, homelessness, world hunger, poverty, abortion, climate change, vaping, human and organ trafficking, and mental health.

You can also brainstorm topics relating to gun violence, gun control, election fraud, drink driving, teenage pregnancy, police brutality, pollution, COVID-19, cyberbullying, and cigarette smoking. The bottom line is to choose an exciting topic with credible scholarly articles and details.

Does a proposal essay need an annotated bibliography?

Unless otherwise stated on your essay prompt, including the reference as per the sample above is enough.

Does a proposal essay require research questions?

No, unlike the research proposal, a proposal argument or proposal essay does not require research questions since no research is being conducted. The purpose of such essays is to propose a solution, more like the problem solution essay.

proposal for essay example

Gradecrest is a professional writing service that provides original model papers. We offer personalized services along with research materials for assistance purposes only. All the materials from our website should be used with proper references. See our Terms of Use Page for proper details.

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  • 6.5 Writing Process: Creating a Proposal
  • 1 Unit Introduction

Introduction

  • 1.1 "Reading" to Understand and Respond
  • 1.2 Social Media Trailblazer: Selena Gomez
  • 1.3 Glance at Critical Response: Rhetoric and Critical Thinking
  • 1.4 Annotated Student Sample: Social Media Post and Responses on Voter Suppression
  • 1.5 Writing Process: Thinking Critically About a “Text”
  • 1.6 Evaluation: Intention vs. Execution
  • 1.7 Spotlight on … Academia
  • 1.8 Portfolio: Tracing Writing Development
  • Further Reading
  • Works Cited
  • 2.1 Seeds of Self
  • 2.2 Identity Trailblazer: Cathy Park Hong
  • 2.3 Glance at the Issues: Oppression and Reclamation
  • 2.4 Annotated Sample Reading from The Souls of Black Folk by W. E. B. Du Bois
  • 2.5 Writing Process: Thinking Critically about How Identity Is Constructed Through Writing
  • 2.6 Evaluation: Antiracism and Inclusivity
  • 2.7 Spotlight on … Variations of English
  • 2.8 Portfolio: Decolonizing Self
  • 3.1 Identity and Expression
  • 3.2 Literacy Narrative Trailblazer: Tara Westover
  • 3.3 Glance at Genre: The Literacy Narrative
  • 3.4 Annotated Sample Reading: from Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass by Frederick Douglass
  • 3.5 Writing Process: Tracing the Beginnings of Literacy
  • 3.6 Editing Focus: Sentence Structure
  • 3.7 Evaluation: Self-Evaluating
  • 3.8 Spotlight on … The Digital Archive of Literacy Narratives (DALN)
  • 3.9 Portfolio: A Literacy Artifact
  • Works Consulted
  • 2 Unit Introduction
  • 4.1 Exploring the Past to Understand the Present
  • 4.2 Memoir Trailblazer: Ta-Nehisi Coates
  • 4.3 Glance at Genre: Conflict, Detail, and Revelation
  • 4.4 Annotated Sample Reading: from Life on the Mississippi by Mark Twain
  • 4.5 Writing Process: Making the Personal Public
  • 4.6 Editing Focus: More on Characterization and Point of View
  • 4.7 Evaluation: Structure and Organization
  • 4.8 Spotlight on … Multilingual Writers
  • 4.9 Portfolio: Filtered Memories
  • 5.1 Profiles as Inspiration
  • 5.2 Profile Trailblazer: Veronica Chambers
  • 5.3 Glance at Genre: Subject, Angle, Background, and Description
  • 5.4 Annotated Sample Reading: “Remembering John Lewis” by Carla D. Hayden
  • 5.5 Writing Process: Focusing on the Angle of Your Subject
  • 5.6 Editing Focus: Verb Tense Consistency
  • 5.7 Evaluation: Text as Personal Introduction
  • 5.8 Spotlight on … Profiling a Cultural Artifact
  • 5.9 Portfolio: Subject as a Reflection of Self
  • 6.1 Proposing Change: Thinking Critically About Problems and Solutions
  • 6.2 Proposal Trailblazer: Atul Gawande
  • 6.3 Glance at Genre: Features of Proposals
  • 6.4 Annotated Student Sample: “Slowing Climate Change” by Shawn Krukowski
  • 6.6 Editing Focus: Subject-Verb Agreement
  • 6.7 Evaluation: Conventions, Clarity, and Coherence
  • 6.8 Spotlight on … Technical Writing as a Career
  • 6.9 Portfolio: Reflecting on Problems and Solutions
  • 7.1 Thumbs Up or Down?
  • 7.2 Review Trailblazer: Michiko Kakutani
  • 7.3 Glance at Genre: Criteria, Evidence, Evaluation
  • 7.4 Annotated Student Sample: "Black Representation in Film" by Caelia Marshall
  • 7.5 Writing Process: Thinking Critically About Entertainment
  • 7.6 Editing Focus: Quotations
  • 7.7 Evaluation: Effect on Audience
  • 7.8 Spotlight on … Language and Culture
  • 7.9 Portfolio: What the Arts Say About You
  • 8.1 Information and Critical Thinking
  • 8.2 Analytical Report Trailblazer: Barbara Ehrenreich
  • 8.3 Glance at Genre: Informal and Formal Analytical Reports
  • 8.4 Annotated Student Sample: "U.S. Response to COVID-19" by Trevor Garcia
  • 8.5 Writing Process: Creating an Analytical Report
  • 8.6 Editing Focus: Commas with Nonessential and Essential Information
  • 8.7 Evaluation: Reviewing the Final Draft
  • 8.8 Spotlight on … Discipline-Specific and Technical Language
  • 8.9 Portfolio: Evidence and Objectivity
  • 9.1 Breaking the Whole into Its Parts
  • 9.2 Rhetorical Analysis Trailblazer: Jamil Smith
  • 9.3 Glance at Genre: Rhetorical Strategies
  • 9.4 Annotated Student Sample: “Rhetorical Analysis: Evicted by Matthew Desmond” by Eliana Evans
  • 9.5 Writing Process: Thinking Critically about Rhetoric
  • 9.6 Editing Focus: Mixed Sentence Constructions
  • 9.7 Evaluation: Rhetorical Analysis
  • 9.8 Spotlight on … Business and Law
  • 9.9 Portfolio: How Thinking Critically about Rhetoric Affects Intellectual Growth
  • 10.1 Making a Case: Defining a Position Argument
  • 10.2 Position Argument Trailblazer: Charles Blow
  • 10.3 Glance at Genre: Thesis, Reasoning, and Evidence
  • 10.4 Annotated Sample Reading: "Remarks at the University of Michigan" by Lyndon B. Johnson
  • 10.5 Writing Process: Creating a Position Argument
  • 10.6 Editing Focus: Paragraphs and Transitions
  • 10.7 Evaluation: Varied Appeals
  • 10.8 Spotlight on … Citation
  • 10.9 Portfolio: Growth in the Development of Argument
  • 11.1 Developing Your Sense of Logic
  • 11.2 Reasoning Trailblazer: Paul D. N. Hebert
  • 11.3 Glance at Genre: Reasoning Strategies and Signal Words
  • 11.4 Annotated Sample Reading: from Book VII of The Republic by Plato
  • 11.5 Writing Process: Reasoning Supported by Evidence
  • 12.1 Introducing Research and Research Evidence
  • 12.2 Argumentative Research Trailblazer: Samin Nosrat
  • 12.3 Glance at Genre: Introducing Research as Evidence
  • 12.4 Annotated Student Sample: "Healthy Diets from Sustainable Sources Can Save the Earth" by Lily Tran
  • 12.5 Writing Process: Integrating Research
  • 12.6 Editing Focus: Integrating Sources and Quotations
  • 12.7 Evaluation: Effectiveness of Research Paper
  • 12.8 Spotlight on … Bias in Language and Research
  • 12.9 Portfolio: Why Facts Matter in Research Argumentation
  • 13.1 The Research Process: Where to Look for Existing Sources
  • 13.2 The Research Process: How to Create Sources
  • 13.3 Glance at the Research Process: Key Skills
  • 13.4 Annotated Student Sample: Research Log
  • 13.5 Research Process: Making Notes, Synthesizing Information, and Keeping a Research Log
  • 13.6 Spotlight on … Ethical Research
  • 14.1 Compiling Sources for an Annotated Bibliography
  • 14.2 Glance at Form: Citation Style, Purpose, and Formatting
  • 14.3 Annotated Student Sample: “Healthy Diets from Sustainable Sources Can Save the Earth” by Lily Tran
  • 14.4 Writing Process: Informing and Analyzing
  • 15.1 Tracing a Broad Issue in the Individual
  • 15.2 Case Study Trailblazer: Vilayanur S. Ramachandran
  • 15.3 Glance at Genre: Observation, Description, and Analysis
  • 15.4 Annotated Sample Reading: Case Study on Louis Victor "Tan" Leborgne
  • 15.5 Writing Process: Thinking Critically About How People and Language Interact
  • 15.6 Editing Focus: Words Often Confused
  • 15.7 Evaluation: Presentation and Analysis of Case Study
  • 15.8 Spotlight on … Applied Linguistics
  • 15.9 Portfolio: Your Own Uses of Language
  • 3 Unit Introduction
  • 16.1 An Author’s Choices: What Text Says and How It Says It
  • 16.2 Textual Analysis Trailblazer: bell hooks
  • 16.3 Glance at Genre: Print or Textual Analysis
  • 16.4 Annotated Student Sample: "Artists at Work" by Gwyn Garrison
  • 16.5 Writing Process: Thinking Critically About Text
  • 16.6 Editing Focus: Literary Works Live in the Present
  • 16.7 Evaluation: Self-Directed Assessment
  • 16.8 Spotlight on … Humanities
  • 16.9 Portfolio: The Academic and the Personal
  • 17.1 “Reading” Images
  • 17.2 Image Trailblazer: Sara Ludy
  • 17.3 Glance at Genre: Relationship Between Image and Rhetoric
  • 17.4 Annotated Student Sample: “Hints of the Homoerotic” by Leo Davis
  • 17.5 Writing Process: Thinking Critically and Writing Persuasively About Images
  • 17.6 Editing Focus: Descriptive Diction
  • 17.7 Evaluation: Relationship Between Analysis and Image
  • 17.8 Spotlight on … Video and Film
  • 17.9 Portfolio: Interplay Between Text and Image
  • 18.1 Mixing Genres and Modes
  • 18.2 Multimodal Trailblazer: Torika Bolatagici
  • 18.3 Glance at Genre: Genre, Audience, Purpose, Organization
  • 18.4 Annotated Sample Reading: “Celebrating a Win-Win” by Alexandra Dapolito Dunn
  • 18.5 Writing Process: Create a Multimodal Advocacy Project
  • 18.6 Evaluation: Transitions
  • 18.7 Spotlight on . . . Technology
  • 18.8 Portfolio: Multimodalism
  • 19.1 Writing, Speaking, and Activism
  • 19.2 Podcast Trailblazer: Alice Wong
  • 19.3 Glance at Genre: Language Performance and Visuals
  • 19.4 Annotated Student Sample: “Are New DOT Regulations Discriminatory?” by Zain A. Kumar
  • 19.5 Writing Process: Writing to Speak
  • 19.6 Evaluation: Bridging Writing and Speaking
  • 19.7 Spotlight on … Delivery/Public Speaking
  • 19.8 Portfolio: Everyday Rhetoric, Rhetoric Every Day
  • 20.1 Thinking Critically about Your Semester
  • 20.2 Reflection Trailblazer: Sandra Cisneros
  • 20.3 Glance at Genre: Purpose and Structure
  • 20.4 Annotated Sample Reading: “Don’t Expect Congrats” by Dale Trumbore
  • 20.5 Writing Process: Looking Back, Looking Forward
  • 20.6 Editing Focus: Pronouns
  • 20.7 Evaluation: Evaluating Self-Reflection
  • 20.8 Spotlight on … Pronouns in Context

Learning Outcomes

By the end of this section, you will be able to:

  • Describe the elements of the rhetorical situation for your proposal.
  • Apply prewriting strategies to discover a problem to write about.
  • Gather and synthesize information from appropriate sources.
  • Draft a thesis statement and create an organizational plan.
  • Compose a proposal that develops your ideas and integrates evidence from sources.
  • Implement strategies for drafting, peer reviewing, and revising.

Sometimes writing a paper comes easily, but more often writers work hard to generate ideas and evidence, organize their thoughts, draft, and revise. Experienced writers do their work in multiple steps, and most engage in a recursive process that involves thinking and rethinking, writing and rewriting, and repeating steps multiple times as their ideas develop and sharpen. In broad strokes, most writers go through the following steps to achieve a polished piece of writing:

  • Planning and Organization . Your proposal will come together more easily if you spend time at the start considering the rhetorical situation, understanding your assignment, gathering ideas and evidence, drafting a thesis statement, and creating an organizational plan.
  • Drafting . When you have a good grasp of the problem and solution you are going to write about and how you will organize your proposal, you are ready to draft.
  • Review . With a first draft in hand, make time to get feedback from others. Depending on the structure of your class, you may receive feedback from your instructor or your classmates. You can also work with a tutor in the writing center on your campus, or you can ask someone else you trust, such as a friend, roommate, or family member, to read your writing critically and give honest feedback.
  • Revising . After reviewing feedback from your readers, plan to revise. Focus on their comments: Is your thesis clear? Do you need to make organizational changes to the proposal? Do you need to explain or connect your ideas more clearly?

Considering the Rhetorical Situation

Like other kinds of writing projects, a proposal starts with assessing the rhetorical situation —the circumstance in which a writer communicates with an audience of readers about a subject. As a proposal writer, you make choices based on the purpose for your writing, the audience who will read it, the genre , and the expectations of the community and culture in which you are working. The brainstorming questions in Table 6.1 can help you begin:

Summary of Assignment

Write a proposal that discusses a problem you want to learn more about and that recommends a solution. The problem you choose must be a current problem, even though it may have been a problem for many years. The problem must also affect many people, and it must have an actual solution or solutions that you can learn about through research. In other words, the problem cannot be unique to you, and the solution you recommend cannot be one you only imagine; both the problem and the solution must be grounded in reality.

One way to get ideas about a problem to write about is to read a high-quality newspaper, website, or social media account for a week. Read widely on whatever platform you choose so that you learn what people are saying, what a newspaper’s editorial board is taking a stand on, what opinion writers are making cases for in op-eds, and what community members are commenting on. You’ll begin to get a handle on problems in your community or state that people care about. If you read a paper or website with a national or international audience, you’ll learn about problems that affect people in other places.

You will need to consult and cite at least five reliable sources. They can be scholarly, but they do not have to be. They must be credible, trustworthy, and unbiased. Possible sources include articles from reputable newspapers, magazines, and academic and professional journals; reputable websites; government sources; and visual sources. Depending on your topic, you may want to conduct a survey, an interview, or an experiment. See Research Process: Accessing and Recording Information and Annotated Bibliography: Gathering, Evaluating, and Documenting Sources for information about creating and finding sources. Your proposal can include a visual or media source if it provides appropriate, relevant evidence.

Another Lens. Another way to approach a proposal assignment is to consider problems that affect you directly and affect others. Perhaps you are concerned about running up student loan debt. Or perhaps you worry about how to pay your rent while earning minimum wage. These concerns are valid and affect many college students around the United States. Another way is to think about problems that affect others. Perhaps students in your class or on your campus have backgrounds and experiences that differ from yours— what problems or challenges might they have encountered during their time in college that you don’t know about?

As you think about the purpose and audience for your proposal, think again about the rhetorical situation, specifically about the audience you want to reach and the mode of presentation best suited to them and your purpose. For example, say you’re dissatisfied with the process for electing student leaders on your campus. If your purpose is to identify the problems in the process and propose a change, then your audience would include other students, the group or committee that oversees student elections, and perhaps others. To reach other students who might also be dissatisfied, you might write an article, editorial, or letter for the campus newspaper, social media page, or website, depending on how students on your campus get news. In addition, you might organize a meeting of other students to get their input on the problem. To reach the decision makers, which may include elected students, faculty, and administrators, you might need to prepare an oral presentation and a slide deck.

Below in Figure 6.7 are three slides from Shawn Krukowski’s proposal that he adapted for a presentation: the title slide, a slide on one aspect of the problem, and a slide introducing one of the proposed solutions.

Quick Launch: Finding a Problem to Write About

A proposal must address a real-life problem and present one or more workable solutions. Usually, problems worth writing about are not easily solved; if they were, they would no longer be considered problems. Indeed, problems in proposals are often complex, and solutions are often complicated and involve trade-offs. Sometimes people disagree about whether the problem is a problem at all and whether any proposed solutions are viable solutions.

Exploring a Problem

One way to generate ideas about a problem is to brainstorm. To explore a topic for your proposal, use a graphic organizer like Table 6.2 to write responses to the following statements and questions:

For example, perhaps you’re considering a career in information technology, and you’re taking an IT class. You might be interested in exploring the problem of data breaches. A data breach is a real-world problem with possible solutions, so it passes the first test of being an actual problem with possible solutions. Your responses to the questions above might look something like those in Table 6.3 :

Narrowing and Focusing

Many problems for a proposal can be too broad to tackle in a single paper. For example, the sample above reveals that data breaches are indeed a problem but that several aspects can be explored. If you tried to cover all the aspects, you would be left writing general paragraphs with little specific information. The topic needs to be narrowed and focused.

The data breaches example above could be narrowed to the following problems—and possibly even more. Note that the questions start to zero in on possible solutions, too. In your own writing, as you brainstorm, try placing subtopics you discover into their own categories and asking more questions, as shown in Table 6.4 .

Sample Proposal Topics

The following broad topics are potentially suitable as a start for a proposal. Choose one of these or one of your own, and ask the exploring questions. Then look at your responses, and ask focusing questions. Continue to focus until you have a specific problem that you can discuss in sufficient depth and offer a concrete solution or solutions.

  • Health fields: cost of medical and dental care for uninsured people, management of chronic conditions and diseases, infection control, vaccinations, access to mental health care, drug use and addiction, sports injuries, workplace safety
  • Education: gaps in academic achievement, curriculum, recruitment and retention of staff and/or students, buildings and grounds, graduation rates, cocurricular activities
  • Environment: forest management and fires, hurricanes and other extreme storms, water and air pollution, sustainable development, invasive species, waste management, recycling and composting, community gardening
  • Engineering and computer science: robotics, vehicles and transportation, digital divide, online privacy, misinformation and misbehavior on social media, video games
  • Business and manufacturing: quality improvement, process improvement, cost control, communication, social media, pay equity, fundraising, sourcing of materials, net-zero energy processes, workplace safety
  • Policy and politics: public institutions, such as public schools, libraries, transportation systems, and parks; taxes, fees, and services; donations to political campaigns; healthcare, such as Medicare and Medicaid; social security; unemployment insurance; services for active military and veterans; immigration policy
  • Society and culture: social media and free speech; inequality in housing, employment, education, and more; cancel culture; bullying; wealth and poverty; support for the arts; athletes and sports; disparities related to race, sex, gender identity and expression, age, and/or ability

Gathering Information

Proposals are rooted in information and evidence; therefore, most proposal assignments require you to conduct research. Depending on your assignment, you may need to do formal research, an activity that involves finding sources and evaluating them for reliability, reading them carefully and taking notes, and citing all words you quote and ideas you borrow. See Research Process: Accessing and Recording Information and Annotated Bibliography: Gathering, Evaluating, and Documenting Sources for detailed instruction on conducting research. If you are proposing a solution to a problem in your local community or on your campus, you may need to conduct primary research as well, such as a survey or interviews with people who live or work there.

Whether you conduct in-depth research or do background reading, keep track of the ideas that come to you and the information you learn. You can write or dictate notes using an app on your phone or computer, or you can jot notes in a journal if you prefer pen and paper. Then, when you are ready to begin to organize what you have learned, you will have a record of your thoughts and information. Always track the source of the information you gather, whether from your reading or a person you interviewed, so that you can return to that source if you need more information and can credit the source in your paper.

Kinds of Evidence

You will use evidence to demonstrate that the problem is real and worthy of being solved and that your recommended solution is workable. Choose evidence for your proposal that is rooted in facts. In addition, choose evidence that best supports the angle you take on your topic and meets your instructor’s requirements. Cite all evidence you use from a source. Consider the following kinds of evidence and examples of each:

Definition : an explanation of a key word, idea, or concept.

The Personal Data Notification & Protection Act of 2017 defines a security breach as “a compromise of the security, confidentiality, or integrity of, or the loss of, computerized data that results in… (i) the unauthorized acquisition of sensitive personally identifiable information; or (ii) access to sensitive personally identifiable information that is for an unauthorized purpose, or in excess of authorization.”

Example : an illustration of an idea or concept.

Every month, university staff members receive a fake phishing email from the IT department. The goal is to train employees of the university to be critical readers of every email they receive.

Expert opinion : a statement by a professional whose opinion is respected in the field.

In The Sixth Extinction , science writer Elizabeth Kolbert observes that humans are making the choice about “which evolutionary pathways will remain and open and which will be forever closed” (268).

Fact : information that is true and can be proven correct or accurate. Statements of fact are built on evidence and data.

In March and April of 2020, 43 states in the United States issued orders directing residents to stay home except for essential activities.

Interview : a person-to-person, phone, or remote conversation that involves an interviewer posing questions to another person or group of people.

During an interview, I asked about parents’ decisions to vaccinate their children. One pediatrician said, “The majority of parents see the benefits of immunizations for their children and for public health. For those who don’t, I talk to them and try to understand why they feel the way they do.”

Quotation : the exact words of an author or speaker.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, SpaceX was required to conduct a “comprehensive review of the company’s safety culture, operational decision-making, and process discipline,” in addition to investigating the crash of its prototype spacecraft (Chang).

Statistics : numerical fact or item of data.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, more than 40 million tons of food waste were generated in 2017, comprising 15.2% of all trash sent to landfills (DeSilver).

Survey : a structured interview in which respondents are all asked the same questions and their answers are tabulated and interpreted. Surveys reveal attitudes, beliefs, or habits of the general public or segments of the population.

In a survey of adults conducted in July 2020, 64 percent of respondents said that social media have a mostly negative effect on American society (Auxier).

  • Visuals and other media : graphs, figures, tables, photographs, diagrams, charts, maps, videos, audio recordings, etc.

Thesis and Organization

Drafting a thesis.

When you have a solid grasp of the problem and solution, try drafting a thesis . A thesis is the main idea that you will convey in your proposal and to which all the paragraphs in the paper should relate. In a proposal, you will likely express this main idea in a thesis statement of one or two sentences toward the end of the introduction.

For example, in the thesis statement Shawn Krukowski wrote for his proposal on climate change, he identifies the problem and previews the solutions he presents:

student sample text What is needed to slow climate change is unified action in two key areas—mitigation and adaptation—spurred by government leadership in the United States and a global commitment to addressing the problem immediately. end student sample text

Here is another example that identifies a problem and multiple solutions:

student sample text The number of women employed in the IT field is decreasing every year, a trend that can be changed with a multifaceted approach that includes initiatives in middle schools, high schools, and colleges; active recruitment; mentoring programs; and flexible work arrangements. end student sample text

After you draft a thesis statement, ask these questions and revise it as needed:

  • Is it engaging? A thesis for a proposal should pique readers’ interest in the problem and possible solutions.
  • Is it precise and specific? If you are interested in curbing the spread of invasive plant species, for example, your thesis should indicate which environment the plant or plants are invading and that you are proposing ways to stop the spread.

Organizing Your Ideas

A proposal has a recognizable shape, starting with an introduction, followed by discussions of the problem, possible solutions, potential objections to the solutions, and a conclusion with a recommendation. A graphic organizer like Table 6.5 can help you organize your ideas and evidence.

Drafting a Proposal

With a tentative thesis, an organization plan, and evidence, you are ready to begin drafting your proposal. For this assignment, you will discuss a problem, present possible solutions, address objections to the solutions, and conclude with a recommendation.

You may choose to write the introduction first, last, or midway through the drafting process. Whenever you choose to write it, use it to draw readers in. Make the proposal topic clear, and be concise. End the introduction with your thesis statement.

Opening a proposal with an overview of your topic is a reliable strategy, as shown in the following student-written example on women working in IT. The thesis statement, which appeared earlier in this section, is underlined:

student sample text People who work in the information technology (IT) field often start their careers fixing computers and other electronic devices for others. Through experience and education, an IT worker’s career path can branch out to specialize in everything from programming new software to setting up and maintaining networks. The IT field is growing because of the constant development of technology, and the demand for employees also is growing. underline Yet the number of women employed in the IT field is decreasing every year, a trend that can be changed with a multifaceted approach that includes initiatives in middle schools, high schools, and colleges; active recruitment; mentoring programs; and flexible work arrangements end underline . end student sample text

Body Paragraphs: Problem, Solutions, Objections

The body paragraphs of your proposal should present the problem, the solution or solutions, and potential objections to the proposed solution(s). As you write these paragraphs, consider using the point , evidence , and analysis pattern:

  • The point is the central idea of the paragraph, usually given in a topic sentence stated in your own words at or toward beginning of the paragraph.
  • With the evidence you provide, you develop the paragraph and support the point given in the topic sentence. Include details, examples, quotations, paraphrases, and summaries from sources. In your sentences and paragraphs, synthesize the evidence you give by showing the connections between sources. See Position Argument: Practicing the Art of Rhetoric and Argumentative Research: Enhancing the Art of Rhetoric with Evidence for more information on quoting, summarizing, paraphrasing, and synthesizing.
  • The analysis comes at the end of the paragraph. In your own words, draw a conclusion about the evidence you have provided and relate it to the topic sentence.

The paragraphs that follow show the point-evidence-analysis pattern in practice.

Body Paragraphs: Problem

Follow the introduction with a discussion of the problem. Using paragraph structure, define the problem and discuss it, drawing on evidence from your sources. This paragraph (or paragraphs) should answer these questions: What is the problem? Why is this a problem? The following example, from the proposal on women working in IT, answers the first question:

student sample text The information technology (IT) field is continuously expanding, with many more positions available than workers to fill them. In fact, the pool of IT professionals was so small that in 2001, Congress raised the visa limit in an effort to fill the gap with employees from overseas (Varma, 2002). And yet the number of women represented in the occupation is decreasing. From 1990 to 2020, the percentage of women in IT declined from 31 percent to 25 percent, even though women make up 47 percent of all employed adults in the United States. According to White (2021), only 19 percent of women pursue a computer science major in college, compared to 27 percent in 1997. Of those women who graduated with a computer science degree, 38 percent are working in the field compared to 56 percent of men, a statistic that indicates women are not staying in the field. Although gender diversity supposedly is valued in the workplace, the underrepresentation of women in IT is clearly a problem. end student sample text

The writer then goes on to answer the second question: Why is this a problem? The writer discusses stereotypes, lack of encouragement and role models, workplace culture, pay, and prospects for advancement (not shown here).

Body Paragraphs: Solutions

After presenting and explaining the problem, use specific information from the sources you consulted to present the solution or solutions you have discovered through your research. If you are proposing more than one solution, present them one at a time, using headings as appropriate.

The solutions section will likely be the longest part of your proposal. Below are two paragraphs from the proposal about women working in IT. Note how the first paragraph introduces the solutions and how the second paragraph uses evidence to develop the first proposed solution. Also note the informative boldface headings.

student sample text The following suggestions are ways to encourage women to enter IT and build their careers, with the eventual goal of achieving gender balance in the field. The solutions discussed include encouraging interest in computer technology among girls in middle school and high school, actively recruiting college-age women to study IT, and within the field, mentoring women and expanding workplace flexibility to improve retention. end student sample text

student sample text The National Center for Women & Information Technology (NCWIT) is an organization that encourages girls in middle school and high school to explore their interest in IT. One program, the NCWIT’s Aspirations in Computing, supports women in high school by showing them that they can succeed in technology and introducing them to other students with similar interests. The same program matches middle-school girls with female high-school and college students and awards scholarships for computing and programming competitions. In addition, internships and IT courses in middle school and high school provide opportunities to learn what a career in IT entails, with or without a degree in IT. Opportunities like these give girls and women support and a sense of belonging. end student sample text

The paragraphs that follow (not shown here) continue the discussion of the possible solutions.

Body Paragraphs: Objections

Depending on the problem and solution, consider the objections readers may raise, and explain why your proposal is necessary and worthwhile. For example, the proposal on women in IT does not discuss objections because few people would object to the writer’s proposal. Shawn Krukowski, however, in his proposal on climate change, includes a section on objections to taking action. He focuses the discussion on people who deny that climate change is a problem. Would you do the same? Consider whether this section of Shawn’s proposal might have been stronger had he addressed objections to the solutions he proposed—mitigation and adaptation—instead of objections to the problem.

student sample text Despite scientific evidence, some people and groups deny that climate change is real or, if they admit it exists, insist it is not a valid concern. Those who think climate change is not a problem point to Earth’s millennia-long history of changing climate as evidence that life has always persisted. Most of the change, however, predates human civilization, which has benefited from thousands of years of stable climate. The rapid change since the Industrial Revolution is unprecedented in human history. end student sample text

student sample text Those who deny climate change or its dangers seek primarily to relax or remove pollution standards and regulations in order to protect, or maximize profit from, their industries. To date, their lobbying has been successful. For example, the world’s fossil-fuel industry received $5.3 trillion in 2015 alone, while the U.S. wind-energy industry received $12.3 billion in subsidies between 2000 and 2020 (Green America, 2020). end student sample text

Conclusion and Recommendation

The conclusion and recommendation section of your proposal is the part in which you interpret your findings and make a recommendation or give a call to action. At this point, focus on the solution that will best solve the problem, suggesting or summarizing specific actions.

Below is the recommendation section from the proposal about women in IT. In the full conclusion (not shown here), the writer summarizes the main points of the proposal. In the recommendation paragraph that follows, the writer calls for specific actions:

student sample text Many researchers have studied why few women choose IT as a career and why some decide to leave the field. Although the numbers cannot be improved immediately, the following changes in school and the workplace could recruit and retain more women in IT: end student sample text

  • Include technology education courses and formal IT programs in middle- and high-school curricula to give girls and young women opportunities to develop an interest at an early age.
  • Develop internship and mentor programs in high schools and colleges to combat stereotyping and encourage women to enter the field.
  • Develop and encourage workplace mentor programs, flexible work options, and open communication for professional growth and retention.

student sample text With time and effort, these actions may result in more women seeing themselves in long-term IT careers. end student sample text

References or Works Cited Page

Including any data you gathered through primary research, such as a survey you created and administered, interviews you conducted, or observational notes you took, you must cite the sources you consulted. These sources appear in the text of your proposal and in a bibliography at the end. The paragraphs in the previous section, including Shawn Krukowski’s proposal, use APA documentation style. For more on documenting sources, see Index and Guide to Documentation , MLA Documentation and Format , and APA Documentation and Format .

Abstract or Executive Summary

An abstract (or executive summary) summarizes your proposal. The purpose is to present information briefly and economically so that readers can decide whether they want to read further. Include your main points, but not the evidence.

Although an abstract or executive summary comes first in a proposal, it is advisable to write it after you have completed your proposal and are certain of your main points. The example below is the abstract from the proposal about women in IT.

student sample text The purpose of this proposal is to raise awareness of the small number of women working in the information technology (IT) field, to examine the factors that contribute to discouraging women from entering IT, and to propose ways to draw women into the field and retain them. Although the IT field is growing, the number of women employed within it remains low. Women may be reluctant to pursue a career in IT because of stereotypes, few role models, and lack of encouragement. Women who have already established a career in IT report leaving the field for these reasons, as well as family responsibilities and lack of advancement. There are several potential ways to raise the number of women in IT. Encouraging interest in computer technology among girls in middle school and high school, recruiting college-age women to study IT, mentoring young professional women, and improving workplace flexibility will, over time, break down stereotypes and increase the number of women in the IT field. end student sample text

Peer Review: Getting Feedback from Readers

With a complete draft in hand, you may engage in peer review with your classmates, giving feedback to each other about the strengths and weaknesses of your drafts. For peer review within a class, your instructor may provide a list of questions or a form for you to complete as you work together.

Conferencing in Writing Groups

Other people can provide feedback on your writing beside your classmates. If you have an on-campus writing center, it is well worth your time to make an online or in-person appointment with a tutor at any point in your writing process. You will get valuable comments and improve your ability to review your own writing.

Another way to get fresh eyes on your writing is to ask a friend or family member to read your draft. To get useful feedback, provide a list of questions or a form such as the one shown in Table 6.6 for them to complete as they read.

Revising Your Proposal

A strong college paper is rarely written in a single draft, so build in time to revise your work. Take time with the comments you receive from your readers, and read your own work with a critical eye.

Responding to Reviewers’ Feedback

When you receive feedback from readers—whether from your instructor, your classmates, a writing tutor, or someone else—read each comment carefully to understand what the reader is communicating. Do your best not to become defensive, and be open to suggestions for improvement. Remind yourself that your readers are trying to help. As someone who hasn’t thought about your proposal as much as you have, a new reader can often see strengths and weaknesses that you cannot. Analyze each response, and decide whether acting on a suggestion will make your writing better. Remember that you remain the author, and you make the final call on your writing.

As you read, keep track of the comments your readers make. Pay special attention to strengths and weaknesses that more than one reader identifies. Use that information to improve later assignments as well as your proposal.

Revising on Your Own

The following revising strategies can help you read your draft critically and carefully:

  • Read your draft aloud. Read the entire text from the beginning slowly and carefully, marking spots that need revision. Reading in this way allows you to see areas that need clarification, explanation, or development that you may have missed when you wrote the first draft. You can also have someone read your draft aloud to you.
  • Make a paragraph outline. The most common unit of thought in writing is the paragraph, a group of sentences set off from other groups because they focus on a single idea. Writing a paragraph outline creates a map of your whole paper that can help you determine whether the organization is effective or needs changing. Number each paragraph and write a phrase describing its topic or focus. Check that each paragraph has a topic sentence that states the main idea of the paragraph.
  • Test your evidence. Check whether each piece of evidence is factual and supports the main idea of the paragraph. Check that each piece of evidence is introduced, woven into your sentences, and cited.
  • Listen for your voice. In most college papers, your language should sound like a real person. If your instructor requires a formal style for the assignment, the language should be objective and in third-person point of view .
  • Let go if you need to. View change as good. Learn to let go of words, sentences, paragraphs, and maybe even your entire first draft. Sometimes the best way to revise is to start fresh. The knowledge you have built in writing a first draft will serve you well if you need to start over.
  • Create a new file for each revision. Each time you revise a draft, save the new version with a new file name so that you don’t lose your previous work. That way, you can return to an earlier version of your draft if you are not happy with the revision.
  • Edit and proofread. When you are satisfied with the overall shape of your paper, reread it once again to check for sentence-level errors in grammar, punctuation, spelling, and source citations.

Taking It Public: Publishing or Presenting Your Proposal

Publishing is a final step in the writing process. You may want to consider publishing your full proposal in your campus newspaper (or rewriting it as a letter to the editor) if your topic is related to your school. Or you may want to present it to an organization or committee on campus that can help you make your solution a reality. If your topic is related to the community in which you live, consider submitting your proposal to the local newspaper or presenting it at a city council meeting. (Note that if you decide to present your proposal orally, you’ll need to figure out in advance the procedure for speaking or getting on a meeting agenda.) If your topic is more general and involves substantial research, consider submitting your proposal to one of these journals that publish undergraduate research work in all fields:

  • American Journal of Undergraduate Research
  • Midwest Journal of Undergraduate Research
  • PURSUE Undergraduate Research Journal

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Ultimate guide to writing a proposal essay, carla johnson.

  • June 14, 2023
  • Essay Topics and Ideas , How to Guides

If you’re a student, it’s likely that you’ve been asked to write a proposal essay at some point. A proposal essay is an academic piece of writing that tries to persuade the reader to do something or take a certain point of view. In this article, we’ll show you the best way to write a proposal essay that gets accepted.

What You'll Learn

What is a proposal essay?

A proposal essay is a type of academic writing in which the writer suggests an idea or solution to a problem and then backs up that suggestion with evidence. The proposal can take many different shapes, but it usually involves pointing out a problem or issue , suggesting a solution or course of action, and giving evidence to back up that solution or action.

Why are proposal essays important?

Proposal essays are important because they give students a chance to look into tough problems and come up with solutions that could change the world. By writing a proposal essay, students learn how to find and analyze information, think critically , and explain their ideas clearly. These skills are useful not only in school, but also in a lot of professional settings.

Thesis statement

In this article , we’ll provide you with a step-by-step guide to writing a proposal essay that will help you win over your audience and get your proposal accepted. We’ll cover everything from choosing a topic to formatting your essay , so you can be sure that you’re presenting your ideas in the most persuasive and effective way possible.

Choosing a Topic

Before you can start writing your proposal essay, you need to choose a topic. There are several factors to consider when choosing a topic, including your personal interests, the scope of the project, and the needs of your audience. Here are some tips to help you choose a great proposal essay topic:

Factors to Consider When Choosing a Topic

1. Your Interests: Choose a topic that you are passionate about or interested in. This will make the research and writing process more enjoyable and engaging.

2. Relevance: Choose a topic that is relevant to your audience or community. This will make your proposal more compelling and increase the likelihood of it being accepted.

3. Feasibility: Choose a topic that is feasible within the scope of your project . Make sure you have access to the resources and information needed to effectively research and support your proposal.

Brainstorming Techniques

Once you have considered these factors, it’s time to start brainstorming potential topics. Here are some techniques to help you generate ideas:

1. Mind Mapping: Create a visual map of your ideas, starting with a central topic and branching out into related subtopics.

2. Freewriting: Set a timer for 10-15 minutes and write down everything that comes to mind about a particular topic. Don’t worry about grammar or structure – just let your ideas flow.

3. Listing: Make a list of potential topics and then narrow it down based on the factors mentioned above.

Examples of Proposal Essay Topics

Here are some examples of proposal essay topics to help inspire your brainstorming:

1. Should college athletes be paid?

2. How can we reduce plastic waste in our community?

3. Should schools require students to wear uniforms?

4. How can we improve mental health resources for college students?

5. Should the minimum wage be increased?

6. How can we reduce the gender pay gap ?

7. Should the government provide free healthcare to all citizens?

8. How can we reduce the carbon footprint of our city?

9. Should there be stricter gun control laws?

10. How can we improve public transportation in our city?

Researching Your Topic

Once you have chosen a topic for your proposal essay, it’s time to conduct thorough research . This will involve gathering information from a variety of sources, evaluating their credibility, and organizing your findings in a way that supports your proposal.

Conducting Thorough Research

The first step in researching your topic is to identify credible sources of information. These may include academic journals, books, government reports, and reputable news sources. Use a variety of sources to ensure that you are getting a balanced and well-rounded perspective on your topic.

Evaluating Sources

Not all sources are created equal, so it’s important to evaluate each source for its credibility and relevance to your topic. Consider the following factors when evaluating sources:

1. Authorship: Who wrote the source, and what are their credentials?

2. Currency: How recent isthe information in the source? Is it still relevant?

3. Accuracy: Is the information in the source accurate and supported by evidence?

4. Bias: Does the source have a particular bias or agenda that may affect its credibility?

Taking Notes and Organizing Information

As you conduct your research, it’s important to take detailed notes and organize your information in a way that supports your proposal essay. Some effective note-taking strategies include:

1. Summarizing: Write a brief summary of key points and information from each source.

2. Quoting: Use direct quotes from sources to support your argument.

3. Paraphrasing: Restate information from sources in your own words, making sure to cite the source.

Once you have taken notes, organize them into an outline or mind map to help you structure your essay and ensure that your proposal is well-supported by evidence.

By following these steps, you can ensure that your proposal essay is well-researched, well-supported, and persuasive. In the next section, we’ll discuss how to effectively outline and structure your essay for maximum impact.

Outlining Your Proposal

Once you’ve chosen a topic and conducted thorough research , it’s time to create an outline for your proposal essay. An outline will help you organize your thoughts and ensure that your proposal is well-structured and easy to follow. Here are some tips for creating an effective proposal essay outline:

Creating a Proposal Essay Outline

1. Introduction: Begin with an attention-grabbing introduction that provides context for your proposal and sets the stage for your argument.

2. Background Information: Provide background information on your topic, including any relevant statistics, research, or historical context.

3. Problem Statement: Clearly state the problem or issue that your proposal addresses.

4. Proposed Solution: Present your proposed solution or course of action, providing evidence to support its effectiveness.

5. Implementation: Discuss how your proposed solution would be implemented and what steps would need to be taken to make it a reality.

6. Conclusion: Summarize your proposal and reiterate its importance, urging your audience to take action.

Tips for Effective Outlining

– Use bullet points or numbered lists to clearly organize your ideas.

– Make sure each section of your outline relates back to your thesis statement .

– Keep your outline concise and to the point.

Example Proposal Essay Outline

Here is an example proposal essay outline for a topic on reducing plastic waste in a community:

I. Introduction

– Attention-grabbing opening sentence

– Background information on plastic waste

– Thesis statement

II. Problem Statement

-Description of the problem of plastic waste in the community

– Statistics on the amount of plastic waste generated in the community

– Impact of plastic waste on the environment and health

III. Proposed Solution

– Proposal to ban single-use plastics in the community

– Alternatives to single-use plastics

– Benefits of reducing plastic waste

IV. Implementation

– Steps to implement the proposed ban on single-use plastics

– Timeline for implementation

– Strategies for community education and outreach

V. Conclusion

– Recap of the problem and proposed solution

– Call to action for community members to support the ban on single-use plastics

V. Writing Your Proposal

Now that you have a solid outline for your proposal essay, it’s time to begin writing. Here are some tips for crafting a strong proposal essay:

Crafting a Strong Introduction

Your introduction should grab the reader’s attention and provide context for your proposal. Here are some tips for crafting a strong introduction:

– Start with a hook, such as a surprising statistic, quote, or anecdote.

– Provide background information on your topic to help the reader understand the context of your proposal.

– Clearly state the problem or issue that your proposal addresses.

Writing the Body of Your Proposal

The body of your proposal essay should provide evidence to support your proposed solution. Here are some tips for writing the body of your proposal:

– Use research and statistics to support your proposal.

– Provide examples and case studies to illustrate the effectiveness of your proposed solution.

– Address Potential counterarguments and provide rebuttals to strengthen your argument.

Tips for Persuasive Writing

To make your proposal essay as persuasive as possible, here are some tips to keep in mind:

– Use strong, clear language that conveys your confidence in your proposal.

– Make sure your argument is logical and well-supported by evidence .

– Use emotional appeals sparingly and only when appropriate.

– Use transitional phrases to connect your ideas and ensure a smooth flow of information.

Avoiding Common Mistakes

Here are some common mistakes to avoid when writing your proposal essay:

– Failing to clearly state the problem or issue you are addressing.

– Presenting a solution that is not feasible or practical .

– Failing to address potential counterarguments or objections to your proposal.

– Overusing emotional appeals or providing insufficient evidence to support your argument.

By following these tips and avoiding common mistakes, you can craft a persuasive and effective proposal essay that will convince your audience to take action.

Refining Your Proposal

Once you’ve written a draft of your proposal essay, it’s important to refine it through careful editing and revision. Here are some tips to help you refine your proposal essay:

Editing and Revising Your Proposal

– Review your essay for grammar, spelling, and punctuation errors.

– Make sure your writing is clear, concise, and easy to understand.

– Check that your proposal is well-supported by evidence and that your arguments are logical.

– Look for areas where you can improve the flow and organization of your essay .

Peer Review and Feedback

It’s also a good idea to get feedback from others to help you refine your proposal essay. Here are some tips for getting feedback:

– Ask a peer or mentor to review your essay and provide feedback on areas that need improvement.

– Consider joining a writing group or seeking feedback from an online community.

– Take the feedback you receive seriously and use it to improve your essay .

Finalizing Your Proposal

Once you’ve made revisions based on feedback and edited your essay for clarity and accuracy, it’s time to finalize your proposal. Here are some final steps to take:

– Review your essay one last time to ensure it is error-free and well-organized.

– Make sure your essay is formatted correctly, with appropriate headings, margins, and font size.

– Create a bibliography or works cited page to provide proper credit to your sources.

Proposal Essay Examples

To help you understand what makes a successful proposal essay,here are some examples of effective proposal essays:

1. “Implementing a School-Wide Recycling Program” – This proposal essay outlines a plan to implement a recycling program in a high school. It provides a clear problem statement, proposed solution, and implementation plan , as well as statistics and research to support the proposal. The essay also addresses potential objections and provides rebuttals.

2. “Increasing Access to Healthy Food in Low-Income Communities” – This proposal essay proposes a solution to the problem of food insecurity in low-income communities. It provides a clear problem statement, proposed solution, and implementation plan, as well as research to support the proposal. The essay also addresses potential objections and provides rebuttals.

3. “Reducing Gun Violence in the United States” – This proposal essay proposes a solution to the problem of gun violence in the United States. It provides a clear problem statement, proposed solution, and implementation plan, as well as statistics and research to support the proposal. The essay also addresses potential objections and provides rebuttals.

Analysis of What Makes These Proposals Effective

These proposal essays are effective because they:

– Clearly state the problem or issue they are addressing.

– Provide a well-supported proposal or solution.

– Address potential objections and provide rebuttals.

– Use research and statistics to support their proposals.

– Provide a clear implementation plan.

– Use clear and persuasive language.

By analyzing successful proposal essays, you can gain insight into what makes a proposal effective and use thoseinsights to improve your own proposal essay. Remember to carefully research your topic , create a clear and well-supported proposal, and address potential objections to make your proposal as persuasive as possible. With these tips and examples in mind, you’ll be well on your way to writing a winning proposal essay.

Frequently Asked Questions

1. what are the elements of a proposal essay.

A proposal essay typically includes an introduction, background information, a problem statement, a proposed solution, an implementation plan, and a conclusion. It should also be well-supported by evidence and address potential objections.

2. How do I choose a topic for a proposal essay?

When choosing a topic for a proposal essay, consider your personal interests, the relevance of the topic to your audience or community, and the feasibility of the proposal within the scope of your project.

3. What is a proposal essay structure?

A proposal essay typically follows a structure that includes an introduction, background information, a problem statement, a proposed solution, an implementation plan, and a conclusion. Each section should be well-supported by evidence.

Writing a winning proposal essay requires careful research, persuasive writing, and effective organization. By choosing a relevant and feasible topic, conducting thorough research, creating a well-supported proposal, and refining your essay through editing and revision, you can create a persuasive and effective proposal essay that inspires action.

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Proposal Essay Examples

A proposal essay is a description of a future project. It pursues two purposes: to convince the reader that the research or business deserves attention and to test the plan’s viability. Because while writing this essay, you may encounter unsurpassable problems that will require you to change the topic.

How to write a paper proposal and what to include in it? The answer largely depends on the topic and the tutor’s requirements. But in any case, it should comprise a literature overview, the methods to be used, and the predicted results.

This website section features proposal essay examples for different study levels and disciplines. Feel free to use them for reference or inspiration.

503 Best Proposal Essay Examples

Employee engagement and retention: sustainability topic.

  • Subjects: Business Employees Management

Creating a Safe and Non-toxic Environment

  • Subjects: Business Employee Relationships

Equipping Children With Guns for Public Consideration

  • Subjects: Society's Imperfections Sociology

Adverse Childhood Experiences With Incarcerated Parents

  • Subjects: Child Psychology Psychology

Post-Operational Care in Diabetic Bariatric Surgery

  • Subjects: Health & Medicine Healthcare Research

The Representation of Saudi Women in the Media

  • Subjects: Gender Inequality Sociology

Stress Management Through Transcendental Meditation

  • Subjects: Alternative Medicine Health & Medicine

Indoors Adventure Program

  • Subjects: Architecture Design

Risks and Limitations Facing Organizations in International Diversification

  • Subjects: Business Risk Management

Problems With Relying on Work of Auditors in Other Countries

  • Subjects: Business Business Controversies

The Effectiveness of Financial and Accounting Software Tools

  • Subjects: Applications Tech & Engineering

Environmental Assessment

  • Subjects: Environment Environmental Studies

Expansion Plan of the Retail Store

  • Subjects: Business Marketing Project

Copyright Issues in Libya

  • Subjects: Intellectual Property Law

Fiduciary Duties: Review

  • Subjects: Business & Corporate Law Law

Prevention as the Future of Managed Health Care

  • Subjects: Administration and Regulation Health & Medicine

Aging as Social Problem in North American Society

  • Words: 1018

Criminologist Advisor as Profession

  • Subjects: Criminology Law

Roles of Organizations in the Recruitment of Nurses in Saudi Arabia

  • Subjects: Health & Medicine Nursing

Managing Natural Resources: Recycling

  • Subjects: Environment Recycling

Index Funds Mersus Actively-Managed Funds

  • Subjects: Business Financial Management

Mother’s Perception on Childhood Obesity in Libya

  • Subjects: Health & Medicine Pediatrics

How Acupuncture Can Help Patients With Migraines

The celebrity obsessed culture: marketing of colleges.

  • Subjects: Advertising Entertainment & Media

The Functional Statement of the Asset Management Department

  • Subjects: Business Management

Strategy: The Benchmarking Program

  • Subjects: Business Strategy

Brand: An Exceptional Food Experience

  • Subjects: Brand Management Business

MRSA: Executive Summary

Emotional intelligence in nursing study by winship, health promotion and smoking cessation.

  • Subjects: Family, Life & Experiences Lifestyle

Social Media Applications in the Workplace

  • Subjects: Entertainment & Media Social Media Issues

Financial Risk Management in Islamic Banking

Bond evaluation types, methods, and factors.

  • Subjects: Economic Concepts Economics

Preventing Painful IV Sticks in Children

Prescribing rights for nurse practitioners in the state of georgia.

  • Words: 1087

Business Transactions With Costco Business Case

  • Subjects: Business Case Study

The Importance of Teamwork With Limited Resources

The lockout and one-punch laws.

  • Subjects: Drug and Alcohol Addiction Sociology

Network Topology Supporting Different Quantity of Employees

  • Subjects: Computer Science Tech & Engineering

Implementation of Menu Labeling

  • Subjects: Diet & Nutrition Food Safety

COVID-19 Awareness in Different Levels of Dental Students

  • Subjects: Health & Medicine Public Health

Ban Key Single-Use Plastic Products

  • Subjects: Environment Human Impact

The Development of New Leadership Needs

  • Subjects: Business Leadership Styles

Windows vs Google. New Operating System as the Key to Success

  • Subjects: Programming Tech & Engineering

The Modern-Day Global Economy

  • Subjects: Economic Development Economics

The Popularity of Outsourcing

Witch-hunt in europe during the middle ages.

  • Subjects: History Medieval History
  • Words: 1032

Home Life and Individuals With Asperger’s Syndrome

  • Subjects: Diagnostics Health & Medicine

Poem Concerning the American Revolutionary War

  • Subjects: Literature Poems

Investigating Zeolites to Separate Hydrogen from Syngas in a Pressure Swing Adsorption

  • Subjects: Chemistry Sciences

Chinese Economy: The Impact of the Novel Coronavirus

  • Subjects: Economic Theories Economics

Information Technology: The Impact of Paperless

  • Subjects: Tech & Engineering Technology Effect

Agricultural Sector: The Use of Drones

  • Subjects: Other Technology Tech & Engineering

The Tracking Device for BEA19 Technologies Ltd: Opportunities

  • Subjects: Sports Sports Science

Policy Alternatives to Control and Prevent the Spread of Schistosomiasis

  • Words: 1026

Racial Issues of “Lemonade” by Beyoncé

  • Subjects: Art Singers

The Success of Homeschooling and How the Program Can Be Increased

  • Subjects: Education Education System

Sunrise Life Skills Software Business

  • Subjects: Project Management Tech & Engineering
  • Words: 1092

Social Distancing: Communication With Patients Families

  • Subjects: Epidemiology Health & Medicine

Recreation Hub as a Way to Combat Sedentary Lifestyle

The state project al-mazunah free zone.

  • Subjects: Economics Investment

Sick Leave Exposition: Interview Regulation

  • Subjects: Communications Sociology

Business Plan For the Rock T-Shirt Brand

Economic development in saudi arabia: unemployment amongst young saudi generation.

  • Subjects: Sciences Scientific Method

Treasured Objects in Beowulf, Milton’s Paradise Lost, and Pope’s “Rape of the Lock”

Plato’s “method of division”.

  • Subjects: Philosophers Philosophy

The Teachers Service Commission

  • Subjects: Education Teacher Career

The Law and Application of Corporate Sustainability in Saudi Arabia

Resolute energy corporation: project plan template, prayer’s impact on individuals and their health, interactive whiteboard use during a meeting.

  • Subjects: Business Business Communication

Student Learning in Traditional Setting vs. Career Academies

  • Subjects: Approach to Learning Education

Ella Fitzgerald, the Jazz Singer

Cardiovascular diseases and saudi male patients aged 40 – 65 years.

  • Subjects: Cardiology Health & Medicine

The Self-Conscious Song in the Opera, the Return of Ulysses to His Homeland

  • Subjects: Art Musicians

The Future of Customer Satisfaction Based on Saudi Corporations Social Marketing Programs

  • Subjects: Business Marketing

Physical and Psychological Trauma in Women

Saudi primary school science teachers’ beliefs: teaching new curriculum.

  • Subjects: Curriculum Development Education

Businesses Restructuring By Delivery and Payment Plan of Goods in Kuwait

  • Subjects: Economics Trade

The Gap Between Managers and Employees in Saudi Arabia

A model for defining relationships between variables.

  • Subjects: Human Rights Sociology

The Concept of Network Security Information

  • Subjects: Computer Security Tech & Engineering

Northern Illinois University Analysis

Key performance indicators for risk management, investigation of the day-to-day life of culture.

  • Subjects: Cultural Studies Culture
  • Words: 1083

Sustainable Development Solutions in Organisations

  • Subjects: Business Entrepreneurship

Artificial and Automated: Innovation in Marketing

  • Subjects: Business Marketing Communication

Contacting Clients for Their Satisfaction

New business and blueprint for the business, global movement “education for all”, the g4 reforming the united nations security council.

  • Subjects: International Relations Politics & Government

Special Education Professional Development Needs of Teachers in Saudi Arabia Assessment

  • Subjects: Education Pedagogical Approaches

IT Executives Role in Successful E-transformation in the UAE

  • Subjects: Cyber Security Tech & Engineering

Narrative Approach to Explore the Moral Residue Problem

  • Subjects: Philosophical Concept Philosophy

Total Quality Management: A Viable Solution for Zayed University

  • Subjects: Education Education Theories

The Positive Effects Proactive Maintenance on Asset Sustainability

Rightfoods, inc. sales problems.

  • Subjects: Business Company Analysis

Approaches for Firms to Integrate Inexperienced Graduates

The problem of aging, and the needs of aging employees, renewable energy resources in qatar.

  • Subjects: Environment Environmental Management

10 Years of Government Excellence Program

  • Subjects: Politics & Government Public Administration Activity

Studying Abroad and Improving the Outcomes of Students’ Career Development

  • Subjects: Education Education Abroad

Green Supply Chain With ISO 14001 and 9001 in Australian Hospitals

Sales plan for computer equipment, a leading government strategy in abu dhabi.

  • Subjects: Government Politics & Government

Realism in Girlfriends Directed by Claudia Weill

  • Subjects: Entertainment & Media Movies

Educational Leadership: Data Analysis

Arts and crafts festival event.

  • Subjects: Entertainment & Media Events

Civil Union: Legal Recognition of Same-Sex Couples’ Marriages

  • Words: 2045

Granite City Building Inspectors: Service Crime

  • Subjects: Criminal Investigation Law

New Jersey’s Charter and Public Schools’ Impact

Everyday communication surrounding climate change.

  • Subjects: Climate Change Environment

Advanced Practice Nursing Framework

Ethics in sport industry and role of equipment.

  • Subjects: Ethics Sociology

Human Security and Collapse of the Soviet Union

  • Subjects: Political Ideologies Politics & Government

Human Environmental Security as a Global Challenge

  • Subjects: Ecology Environment

Various Issues Surrounding the Concept of Lawful Humanitarian

Deciphering the best start-up fundraising ways, mobile health promotion unit project, kfc restaurant project plan.

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Sample Academic Proposals

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How To Write An Essay Proposal: Helpful Guideline For Students

how to write an essay proposal

Many students want to learn how to write an essay proposal when joining college. Most learners can read and write a five-paragraph essay when completing secondary education. However, very few students have experience with writing an essay proposal. A proposal is a typical assignment; students can write it based on an essay prompt. This article explains what an essay proposal is and how to write it.

Table of Contents

What is a proposal essay.

  • What Is The Goal Of An Essay Proposal?

Why You Might Need An Essay Proposal

How to write a proposal for an essay, essay proposal example, how to start a proposal essay, how to write proposal: a step-by-step guide, essay proposal format.

  • Tips And Hints On How To Write A Proposal Essay
An essay proposal is a paper that describes or proposes an idea or thesis that you intend to write. It outlines the main points you will discuss in the body of the paper while providing supporting evidence for the proposed argument.

A thesis represents the research and its main idea. However, a proposal essay encapsulates the content and purpose of the paper. It aims to convince the educational committee that the topic and approach are sound, hoping to get you the approval to proceed to the actual research.

Some call it a proposal argument that presents a problem that needs fixing or a necessary change. While people mostly write proposals in economics, management, and businesses, scientists, students, and other professionals write them.

What Is The Goal Of An Essay Proposal?

An essay proposal aims to persuade the reader that your topic is worth investigating. It should include a brief overview of the main points you will discuss in the body of the paper and provide supporting evidence for the proposed argument. Here’s what an effective essay proposal does:

  • It suggests a change or idea.
  • It convinces your readers to adopt a change or view.
  • It shows your mastery of a concept in your field
  • It presents a case for a change process or idea’s implementation
  • It confirms the practicality, applicability, and feasibility of an idea, a program, or a change

Learning how to write essay proposal requires understanding its points. Essentially, this paper should represent a well-explained problem or issue. It proposes a way to solve it and a discussion explaining why your solution is the best.

You need an essay proposal if your teacher or professor assigns you a research paper. This paper outlines the scope and purpose of your project. And this is helpful because it ensures that the involved parties agree about the project and its content. It states to the stakeholder or decision-maker that you understand your project and its scope.

Learning to write a proposal is essential if you want to score a higher grade for a school or college course you’re taking. Also, this skill is vital if you want to write proposals to get business or project funding. Once you acquire this skill, you can write persuasively on a specific topic without struggling to start.

You do most of the work in the pre-writing stages when writing a proposal essay. Here’s what you should do before starting.

Know your readers: This essay aims to convince the audience that you have a worth-pursuing idea. Therefore, know who will read the proposal before you write it. Are you writing for a business person, government officials, or academics? If your readers are business people, justify the proposal by highlighting its potential financial benefits. If it’s for government officials, emphasize the proposal’s popularity. Research: You will have a higher chance of persuading others of the proposal if you have secondary sources supporting your claim. Therefore, talk to experts or read their research before writing your proposal. Pre-write: Take your time to brainstorm ideas before writing the essay. Also, think about ways to organize the views once you have them. Revise: Have a colleague or peer read the paper and provide feedback. After that, incorporate the feedback into your second draft.

Perhaps, you can also read a good essay proposal sample to understand what the readers expect you to include in your paper.

Here’s a good essay proposal example to take a peak at to shape and inspire your ideas, before we get into the details:

Christianity has not often seen eye to eye with women’s issues, particularly reproductive rights. For many years, Christianity in several forms has suggested that abortion is immoral, considering it to be the termination or murder of an unborn child (Stensvold, 2015). Whilst this terminology is helpful for creating an atmosphere of tension between women seeking abortion and their religious views, it needs to be critically examined for the way that it influences women who are practicing Christians and their attitudes towards their own body. The topic of abortion is also important because it has been traditionally seen as immoral, but more and more women (including practicing Christians) are choosing to undergo the procedure. It needs to be reevaluated in terms of modern society and understood for its significance in Christianity. Historically, the Catholic Church has been one of the biggest influencers on abortion (Stensvold, 2015). Despite this, Pope Francis has suggested that priests have the authority to absolve the sin of abortion and that it may not necessarily be one of the biggest issues facing the church (Dias, 2015). The Catholic Church is a big player in the general Christian world, and it is important to critically analyse the effects that it has on other churches. The purpose of this research will be to examine the rules and regulations of a variety of different forms of Christianity and their views on abortion with reference to the Catholic Church as a baseline. Methodology The theoretical perspective of structural functionalism will be used as a basis for conducting a thorough literature review on the topic. By analyzing several different sources which explore different Churches and their views on abortion, structural functionalism will help to place the Catholic Church and others in the context of a changing society. As the structure, norms and morality of the outside world changes, so too do the attitudes of religious believers. The literature review will focus on changing attitudes and beliefs surrounding abortion and so-called reproductive rights to analyse them in context of the Church to understand how both society, and the Catholic Church, influence Christian believers of other Churches. The analysis will include the major denominations in the United Kingdom: Anglican, Baptist, Lutheran, Methodist, Pentecostal, Orthodox, and Presbyterian, as well as brief discussions of non-Trinitarian denominations the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter-day Saints, Jehovah’s Witnesses, and Quakers. Significance This work is important for several reasons. It will highlight the influence of the Catholic Church on other areas of Christianity, which is important as Catholicism remains the largest denomination. It will also help to highlight the effects of non-religious society on the views of various churches towards sin and absolution, which is important in a rapidly paced, globalized world. It will also help to highlight some of the key differences between denominations of Christianity in the United Kingdom. These three elements will come together to give a full picture on the controversial topic of abortion and the reasoning that many Christians give for its morality or immorality. Understanding this will help guide the ministerial profession into giving good, moral guidance to followers within the Church and to highlight some of the issues that will likely arise in practice.

Besides indicating your action plan, the proposal should have a theoretical positioning and a relationship to past work in your field. The readers will be more likely to approve your ideas or suggestions if your essay proposal is concise, clear, and engaging.

In most fields, a captivating and persuasive proposal is essential for success. Several proposal types include thesis proposals, book proposals, and science proposals. However, they have similar basic guidelines. Here’s how you can start your proposal.

  • Topic rationale: Demonstrate why the topic is essential in your discipline. Also, include the objective limitations without promising something you can’t deliver.
  • Review past works: Review published works that relate to your topic. Also, explain how your essay builds on the previous studies while exploring new territory.
  • Outline your methodology or approach: Compose an essay proposal outline with the necessary resources, costs, and time for the work.

Different disciplines have varying standards for essay proposals. However, most essay proposals emphasize a specific focus of the study question. Also, they include headings, lists, and visuals, that make reading and cross-referencing easy. Additionally, use a concrete and precise style showing the feasibility of your idea.

Once you have the basic guidelines for writing your essay proposal, the next step is learning the steps to follow when doing it. A good format will help the academic committee comprehend your application’s seriousness or intent. The school, class, or institution you’re submitting the proposal to will determine your proposal’s format. Here’s a general step-by-step guide for writing a proposal.

Introduction: Start by introducing the issue you want to address to the committee. Present a firm introduction to enrapture the readers from the beginning. Background: The background should provide details of the issue while setting the stage, highlighting past studies on the topic or subject. Address stark facts to show the reason to address the problem immediately. Ideally, start the background with facts instead of your opinion. Significance: Explain what makes your study significant. Provide evidence from reports, studies, and other literature supporting your argument and showing the need to investigate your chosen topic for a proposal essay. Research hypotheses or questions: This section should explain your study goals. The hypotheses or questions should guide your analysis. Emphasize the need to solve the problem and how it affects your readers if this doesn’t happen immediately. Use credible facts and sources to support your hypotheses. Study design: Explain how you plan to conduct your study. Also, address the methodology to use in addressing the issue. In this section, show the readers how you will address the problem, why you choose to do it in a specific way, and the possible outcome. Conclusion: The conclusion should summarize the information you’ve provided in the other sections. Also, explain how the study will address the focus problem. You can conclude the proposal with one or two paragraphs describing how the study will address the issue. Essentially, the conclusion should morrow the introduction while wrapping up the overall message. This section should also address the consequences of the failure to undertake your proposal. Also, leave readers with something to think about and thank them for their consideration. Bibliography: This section is optional and lists the literature you read supporting your proposal’s content. Continue with the text if you don’t want to add a bibliography.

If some content doesn’t fit in your proposal, add an appendix. However, your proposal shouldn’t be too long because it can scare off some readers. Therefore, make it concise and clear by proofreading and editing. Also, ask somebody to proofread and critique your work to ensure an engaging and attractive presentation. Seeking help can also make your proposal more organized and helpful.

A basic format or outline will help you organize your proposal. College professors and teachers have expectations. Therefore, check your educator’s or supervisor’s requirements before writing your proposal. Here’s the basic format for an essay proposal.

  • Introduction: The introduction summarizes the main points while establishing your paper’s purpose. For instance, when proposing a new approach to a topic, the opening can start with a brief description and then present an argument telling the audience why your method is the best.
  • Body: The body of a proposal should present an argument supporting the main idea. Include evidence backing up the claim to compose a well-supported essay. And this evidence can be quotes, statistics, or real-life examples. Include sufficient evidence to support the argument.
  • Conclusion: The conclusion should summarize the argument you presented in the essay. Also, motivate the readers to take action based on your discussion. Most importantly, remind the readers why your topic is essential and its possible impact.

Ensure that each section comes out clearly in your paper. Also, ensure that your ideas flow logically from the introduction to the conclusion.

Tips And Hints On How To Write A Proposal Essay

Your proposal should be eye-catching and captivating. Here are tips to help improve your paper. They should be a great essay homework help and assistance to you!

  • Please do your research: Before beginning to write your proposal essay, it is essential to do your research. And this will help you better understand the topic at hand and will allow you to formulate a more well-rounded argument. It is also essential to be familiar with the opposing side of the debate, as this will enable you to anticipate counterarguments and refute them accordingly.
  • Keep it concise: When writing a proposal essay, it is vital to keep the paper brief and to the point. The goal is not to provide a complete overview of the topic but to present a clear and concise argument for the proposed solution. Be sure to edit the paper carefully before submitting it, as a well-written and well-argued proposal is more likely to be successful than a poorly written one.
  • Make a clear argument: It’s essential to ensure that your view is clear and easy to follow. Remember that the goal is to persuade the reader of the viability of your proposed solution, so be sure to present your argument logically and straightforwardly.
  • Write convincingly: Present evidence and facts to make your solution more convincing and efficient than what exists. Apart from making your plan awesome, ensure that readers see you as the person that can do it efficiently.
  • Explain the plan: Your proposal should have a step-by-step plan with details to make the process easy to understand.
  • Show your anticipation: Present an implementation plan, showing the complete process and how it will solve the problem.
  • Present your desired results: Ensure that readers see and understand your desired results. Focus on defining everything in your proposal.
  • Necessary resources: Explain what you need to complete the project. And this can include tangible resources, like computers, money, and paper. Also, you require intangible resources like time to complete the project.
  • Preparation mode: Ensure that your readers see that you know what you plan to do. Looking more prepared will improve the approval chances for your proposal.

In addition to these tips, edit your proposal essay carefully before submitting it. Ensure it’s free of grammatical, spelling, and punctuation errors. Additionally, read a sample to know what to include in your proposal.

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Do you need help writing a custom proposal? If so, we can help you if you contact us saying, “Please write my essay proposal.” We have knowledgeable and trustworthy writers with a proven track record of helping any student that needs help with research, writing, editing, or wishes to buy homework online.

Whether in college, university, or high school, we can help you write a winning proposal. We will deliver an excellent piece regardless of your proposal’s structure, subject, or level. We offer secure and helpful online services that cater to the needs of learners at various academic levels and disciplines. Our services are perfect for any learner that wants to present a perfect and successful proposal. Contact us to get the correct proposal that will help you excel academically.

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414 Proposal Essay Topics for Projects, Research, & Proposal Arguments

Writing a proposal essay is an essential skill for students navigating academia and beyond. Whether you are advocating for change, proposing a solution to a problem, or presenting a new idea, your writing should be clear, convincing, and creative.

In this article, our expert team has listed proposal essay topics for school and college students. As a bonus, you will find an effective writing guide and a practical example of a proposal essay.

🔤 What Is a Proposal Essay?

  • ⭐ Best Topics in 2024
  • 💡 Easy Topics & Prompts

📝 Proposal Argument Topics

  • 📊 Project Proposal Ideas
  • 🔎 Research Proposal Topics
  • 😄 Funny Topics

🧩 Proposal Essay Structure

  • ✍️ Writing Guide
  • 📃 Proposal Essay Example

🔗 References

A proposal essay is an academic paper in which you propose something and justify your recommendation. Its goal is to convince the recipients to support your proposal and grant your request. Depending on what you are suggesting, there are three main types of proposal essays: proposal argument, research proposal, and topic proposal.

This image shows proposal essay types.

What Is a Proposal Argument Essay?

A proposal argument is an argumentative essay that offers a solution to a problem. It is often addressed to a particular company, non-profit organization, or government agency. It aims to persuade an organization to do something differently or perform a specific task. A proposal argument first describes a problem, then proposes a feasible solution to it, and explains why this particular solution is worth implementing.

What Is a Research Proposal Essay?

A research proposal essay is an academic paper that proposes a study and describes what, why, and how the author plans to investigate. This document should enable the audience to understand the quality and significance of the research and the author’s competence to perform it.

A research proposal usually includes a purpose statement , background and significance of the research topic, and methodology. It is also helpful to describe potential problems the researcher may encounter and how they will be solved.

What Is a Topic Proposal?

A topic proposal essay is a paper that suggests a topic for a major course assignment, such as a term paper. It usually presents your main argument or research question , explains why it is worth exploring, and outlines how you plan to support it. Also, it identifies a few scholarly sources to be used in the future paper.

⭐ 12 Best Proposal Essay Topics in 2024

  • The methods of reducing childhood obesity.
  • Do awareness campaigns increase funding for cancer research?
  • Why should schools add sex education to their curricula?
  • The role of government in protecting local businesses.
  • How to prevent cybercrime.
  • The impact of rap music on teenagers.
  • Do high cigarette prices reduce smoking rates?
  • The efficiency of using AI technology in education.
  • Why should the use of steroids be banned?
  • The use of art therapy in combating anxiety.
  • How can we combat the global warming?
  • The issue of bullying in high school.

💡 Easy Proposal Writing Topics & Prompts

Coming up with a good idea for your proposal essay can be challenging. Therefore, we’ve prepared writing prompts about common problems with possible solutions.

Proposal Essay on Texting and Driving

You can write a proposal suggesting a solution to the problem of driving while using a phone. First, describe the detrimental consequences of such behavior, proving that it’s worth paying attention to.

Then, focus on one solution that you consider to be the best. Check out some possible options:

  • Formation of a driver safety culture.
  • Implementation of a driver coaching program.
  • Use of real-time technology.
  • Execution of severe punishment.

Homelessness Proposal Essay

Highlight the issue of homelessness by indicating the root causes of this problem and its social and economic consequences. Then, provide your perspective on how to address it.

Here are some possible solutions to homelessness:

  • Rapid rehousing .
  • Permanent supportive or shared housing.
  • New career opportunities.
  • Volunteer initiatives.

Mental Health Proposal Essay

You can focus on the problem of the mental health crisis, manifesting in increasing rates of suicides and overdoses. Explore the causes and consequences of this issue and choose a solution to advocate for.

Consider the following solutions:

  • Investments in mental health apps .
  • Universal mental health screenings.
  • Raising people’s awareness of the problem.
  • Expanding access to psychological help.

Study Abroad Proposal Essay

You can focus on one of the issues that students face while studying abroad, such as language barriers, cultural differences, social isolation, financial difficulties, etc. Then, describe a solution to your selected problem.

Here are some possible solutions to international students’ issues:

  • Encouraging access to college resources.
  • The use of host families.
  • Establishing safe spaces on campuses .
  • Offering financial support and scholarships.
  • Conducting campus-wide cultural sensitivity training.

Abortion Proposal Essay

Your proposal can focus on the problem of supporting and expanding abortion rights. Explain how restricted abortion rights harm women, children, the healthcare system, and the economy. Then, explain how policymakers can address this issue.

Check out some solutions listed below:

  • Public and private insurance coverage of abortion.
  • Sex education for students.
  • Legal protections for abortion.
  • Prohibition of violence against abortion providers .

The proposal argument analyzes the problem and offers practical steps for its solution. Below, you’ll find interesting topics for your proposal argument!

Proposal Argument Essay Topics with Solutions

  • The use of replanting in combating climate change .
  • ABZ Cleaning Services marketing plan proposal .
  • Negotiation to stop military conflicts in the world.
  • Water disinfection and its efficiency in solving water pollution issues.
  • A business proposal for Kohl’s: improving product delivery .
  • Universal basic income to combat poverty .
  • The use of free education centers in improving people’s knowledge.
  • Luckin Coffee business problems-solutions proposal .
  • Ensuring refugees’ access to the labor market to protect their rights.
  • Decriminalization of homosexuality to protect LGBTQ+ rights .
  • Nestlé Inc.’s total quality challenge and solution .
  • The use of media in raising awareness of gender inequality .
  • Ensuring basic healthcare to protect children’s rights.
  • Food prices increase: causes and solutions .
  • The use of renewable energy to stop global temperatures rising .
  • Well-thought-out strategic plan to combat self-doubt in business.
  • Operations management: problem and solution .
  • Education about consumer responsibility to stop overconsumption.
  • The efficiency of book exchange for the promotion of reading .
  • Human resource management: problems and solutions .
  • Reduced cost of education to combat education inequality .
  • Electronic voting systems to increase citizen participation.
  • Truancy: causes, effects, and possible solutions .
  • AI technology and its application to help people with disabilities.
  • The effectiveness of wetland restoration in combating sanitation insecurity.
  • American educational system’s drawbacks and solutions .
  • Surveys of employee satisfaction to manage workflow.
  • The efficiency of the Arms Trade Treaty in decreasing weapons accessibility.
  • Sexual assault problem and solution .
  • Improved nutrition and sustainable agriculture to combat health inequality .

Practical Proposal Argument Ideas

  • Building buyer personas to find new customers.
  • Employee absenteeism and business proposal to address it .
  • Companies should make a shorter workweek to reduce unemployment .
  • Vertical farming technologies for improved land usage.
  • Proposal of employee training in Coca-Cola Company .
  • Plasma reactors as a way to create oxygen on Mars.
  • Community-based initiatives to encourage social interaction.
  • Organizational change proposal for healthcare institutions .
  • Entrepreneurship promotion to solve the wealth inequality issue .
  • Prioritizing border security to ensure national safety.
  • Public health legislation funding proposal .
  • Donating to charities to address third-world poverty.
  • Nutrition education to reduce obesity rates.
  • Business communication: proposal for receiving investment .
  • Implementation of Instagram restrictions to protect the self-esteem of teenagers .
  • The use of ADAS technologies to reduce the frequency of car accidents.
  • Vending machine “Great Coffee”: business proposal .
  • Employers should provide flexible hours to help workers with anxiety.
  • Expanding the range of services offered by postal providers to save postal service .
  • Wok to Walk: marketing plan proposal .
  • Work-life balance practices to prevent burnout at work.
  • Schools should implement year-round classes to improve student performance.
  • Cartier marketing analysis and strategy proposal for the post-pandemic era .
  • Application of sunscreen to reduce the risks of skin cancer .
  • Installation of sports facilities to encourage the population’s physical activity .
  • Leverage buyout proposal for CSL Limited .
  • Education about consumer responsibility to solve gun control issues.
  • Development of water resource management systems to avoid water scarcity .
  • Business ethics: business proposal for CEO .
  • The government should launch mHealth apps to make healthcare accessible.

📊 Project Proposal Ideas for College Students

Looking for a project proposal topic to write about? Below, you’ll find the best ideas for your paper!

Project Proposal Title Ideas in Health

  • The ban on tobacco to prevent illness and premature death.
  • Pressure ulcers: research proposal .
  • Recovery groups and their role in stopping substance abuse .
  • The efficiency of sex education in solving HIV/AIDS issues.
  • Community teaching work plan proposal: tuberculosis in Miami .
  • Accessible treatment centers to help people struggling with suicidal behavior .
  • Pediatric dentist training to create a positive experience for children.
  • Hospital-acquired pressure ulcers treatment proposal .
  • Water and sanitation projects to reduce water-borne disease rates.
  • The efficiency of regular balance training in preventing injuries.
  • Interdisciplinary plan proposal of a local hospital: objective and team organization .
  • Free screening for the early identification of breast cancer .
  • Workplace wellness initiatives to protect employee mental health .
  • Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting: research proposal .
  • The use of online apps to improve patient-doctor communication .
  • Geriatric care innovations to meet the health demands of the elderly.
  • Hypertension prevention plan proposal .
  • Machine learning and AI technology in the personalization of healthcare.
  • The effectiveness of parental courses to prevent children obesity .
  • Patient safety policy proposal .
  • Yoga promotion programs to improve mental health.
  • E-health platforms for remote monitoring of chronic conditions .
  • Capstone project change proposal: new staffing policy .
  • Women’s medical literature and its role in preventing maternal deaths.
  • Accessible mental health services to decrease depression rates.
  • Dementia: health promotion proposal .
  • The use of a healthy diet in preventing cancers and diabetes.
  • Vaccine access in poor countries to promote immunization .
  • A bed alarm budget proposal for healthcare .
  • Educational programs for parents to promote oral health at home .

Project Proposal Topics for Business

  • The use of verification links to stop online scamming.
  • Ocean Beauty Center: business proposal .
  • Customer experience technology to deliver positive customer experience .
  • Research into competitors to create a better brand presence.
  • Service marketing plan proposal .
  • The use of Amazon and eBay to pitch and brand your product.
  • Instant online help tools to prevent shopping cart abandonment.
  • Notes Restore: business plan proposal .
  • The efficiency of valuable content in maintaining customer loyalty .
  • Unique products to thrive in a competitive market.
  • Avlon: market research proposal .
  • The use of plain English in preventing product returns and refunds.
  • Increasing sales by offering a product at a reduced price.
  • Business proposal: a fitness center in Australia .
  • Employment of cybersecurity services to protect a corporate website from viruses.
  • The use of a recruitment agency to find qualified IT personnel.
  • Leisure facility in Sherbury: business proposal .
  • Regular developer training to save business during a crisis.
  • Optimization of website speed through efficient coding.
  • Talent management plan proposal .
  • The use of the latest updates to solve unreliable internet connectivity issues.
  • Mobile-friendly apps to improve customer support .
  • Southwest Airlines human resource recruitment plan proposal .
  • Authentic customer reviews to solve customer trust issues.
  • The use of multi-factor authentication to maintain payment security.
  • Emotional intelligence training proposal .
  • Chatbots and their role in solving poor customer support issues.
  • Workplace diversity and inclusion for fast business development.
  • Utah Symphony and Utah Opera: merger proposal .
  • The efficiency of social media influencers in business promotion.

Project Proposal Ideas for STEM Students

  • Floating gardens and rafts to grow food during a flood.
  • The use of innovative city technologies for solving a city’s design needs.
  • Navigating the engineering talent crisis .
  • Accessible infrastructure to improve the lives of people with disabilities.
  • Chemical dispersants to clean up an oil spill .
  • New technologies in retail supply chains .
  • The use of heat-absorbing materials to construct solar ovens.
  • AI healthcare diagnostics to provide patients with accurate results.
  • Uber case study: online technology development .
  • The use of monitoring systems to protect endangered species.
  • Making technologies more inclusive to help people with autism .
  • How can technology be used in healthcare ?
  • Aerospace engineering strategies to ensure safe flights.
  • Eco-friendly packaging to stop plastic pollution.
  • How new heart-scanning technology could save your life .
  • Building earthquake-resistant structures to ensure urban safety.
  • The use of biodegradable plastics to reduce environmental impact.
  • Use of mathematics in a vocational context .
  • Building seawalls to protect beach erosion.
  • Solar farms for the production of renewable energy.
  • Computerized sewerage system in Bedford Town .
  • Creating artificial organs to save patients waiting for transplantation .
  • Increasing microbial diversity to create a healthy and balanced soil ecosystem.
  • Computerized accounting in an enterprise resource planning system .
  • Early warning systems to save vulnerable areas from flood.
  • The use of vitamin C bath to stop apple oxidization.
  • Effective supply chain practices for computer and phone repair shop .
  • Integration of damping systems to build earthquake-resistant structures.
  • AI technology to design resistant bridges in urban areas.

Project Proposal Topics for Students in Education

  • Funding for low-income schools to solve the problem of education access.
  • Digital citizenship education proposal in Saudi Arabia .
  • Inclusive teaching as a solution to inequalities in education.
  • Students’ portfolios as a better alternative to standardized testing .
  • Standardized testing: research proposal .
  • Incentives for teachers to provide highly professional classes.
  • Increasing federal school funding to improve education in low-income areas.
  • York College OneCard proposal .
  • A peer tutoring program to improve students’ performance.
  • Parent-teacher conferences to address a lack of parental involvement .
  • Proposal for the New National Constitution of Libya .
  • Mentorship programs to cope with ineffective teaching methods.
  • Anti-bullying policies to maintain a more positive school climate.
  • Proposal to reduce college textbook cost .
  • Video chats to address a lack of face-to-face communication in online courses .
  • Study skills workshops to cope with students’ poor study habits.
  • Virtual simulation curriculum technology proposal .
  • Flexible learning environments to help students with anxiety disorder.
  • The use of a rewards system to increase school attendance .
  • How semester exams affect students’ emotional stability: article proposal .
  • Monitoring cameras to ensure school safety and security.
  • Anti-cheating measures to solve the issue of academic dishonesty .
  • Analysis of student equity plan proposal .
  • Additional facilities to accommodate the growing number of students.
  • Global education partnerships to make higher education more accessible.
  • Education issues: group proposal .
  • Innovative classrooms to develop the creativity of students with disabilities.
  • Introducing a financial literacy class to improve students’ money management skills.
  • Proposal for the creation of K2 and K3-5 reading interventions .
  • Launching a community service learning program to promote social responsibility .

Project Proposal Ideas for Students about Environment

  • Buying e-books to protect the environment.
  • The issue of environmental pollution by Polipaks Group .
  • Extensive afforestation campaign to solve the deforestation problem.
  • Low consumption levels to avoid adverse ecological consequences.
  • Solar energy as an alternative energy source .
  • Fines and punishment to reduce illegal dumping.
  • Reusing things to stop climate change.
  • Business model of renewable energy .
  • Reducing single-use plastics on campus.
  • Collecting sunlight for energy to stop natural resource depletion.
  • Sustainable gas production in the UAE .
  • Tree planting programs to protect the environment.
  • Eco-friendly transportation methods to reduce carbon emissions.
  • Sustainable practices in the Coca-Cola Company .
  • Sustainable fashion and its role in reducing clothes consumption.
  • High taxes for activities that harm our planet to support eco-friendly behavior.
  • Carbon tax in the Australian industries .
  • Limiting time on the road to reduce vehicle emissions.
  • Supporting green businesses to encourage eco-friendly initiatives.
  • Optimizing food production to improve quality, reduce cost, and prevent waste .
  • Clean-up programs to remove litter and pollutants from public spaces.
  • Green roof technologies to mitigate the urban heat island effect.
  • Business plan: New Age Recyclers .
  • A carbon offset project to engage businesses in environment protection.
  • Education courses for people of any age to reduce their ecological footprint.
  • Recycling batteries: market analysis for a new product .
  • Replantation of native trees and plants to stop environmental degradation.
  • Investing in solar panels to solve the energy consumption problem.
  • Stanford University’s Habitat Conservation Plan .
  • Choosing recyclables to decrease waste production.

🔎 Research Proposal Essay Topics

If you’re looking for research proposal essay topics, check out the list below! We’ve collected ideas for a proposal in computer science, agriculture, history, and more.

  • Career counseling to support high school students.
  • Project proposal for counseling centers .
  • The effectiveness of advertisement in increasing brand awareness .
  • The reliability of criminological analysis in identifying the offender’s personality.
  • Research proposal on Ipad from Apple Inc .
  • Remote workplaces to save the small business during pandemics.
  • New therapeutic approaches to neurodevelopmental disorders .
  • Research proposal: stress in the UK (England) .
  • The effects of socioeconomic status on access to quality education.
  • The effectiveness of regular self-analysis in overcoming the psychological trauma of rape.
  • Mitigation of supply chain risk in disasters: research proposal .
  • Race to the Top program to improve students’ outcomes.
  • Effective business communication practices contributing to business growth.
  • A research proposal on banks and customer satisfaction .
  • Psychological tricks of media to exploit impulsive buying.
  • The advantages of using antipsychotics for preventing delirium .
  • Congestive heart failure: research proposal .
  • Therapies for school students to stop substance abuse.
  • Controlling school attendance to improve children’s social skills.
  • Research proposal: background of the problem of handoff communication in nursing .
  • The impact of urbanization on biodiversity preservation.
  • Trade globalization to create more job opportunities around the world.
  • Research proposal: Chlamydia Trachomatis .
  • Increase the age of smoking to 25 to reduce lung cancer rates .
  • Potential effects of stricter laws on corruption and transparency.
  • Primary prevention of HIV & AIDS: community teaching work plan proposal .
  • The effectiveness of smart home systems in reducing energy consumption.
  • Testing AI technologies to improve children’s diagnostics and treatment.
  • High-performance work system proposal for workers .
  • Including mental health topics in the school curriculum to protect students’ mental health.
  • Paid vacations to support nurses’ emotional health.
  • Non-profit National Kidney Foundation’s strategy proposal .
  • Meditation to treat mental disorders nonchemically during pregnancy.
  • Workplace diversity and its role in increasing business productivity .
  • Business proposal report for a child day care .
  • Face-to-face games to promote healthy child development .
  • Investigating the relationship between sleep patterns and mental health in youth.

Proposal Essay Ideas in Computer Science

  • New AI approaches to decrease the energy consumption of 5G networks.
  • Informatics solution proposal: general solution – EHR .
  • Ways to ensure data privacy in machine learning models.
  • Exploring new applications of quantum computing.
  • DesignIT Company: network consultation proposal .
  • AI in art: exploring the boundaries between art and technology.
  • Cognitive radio networks for improving future wireless systems.
  • Informatics solution proposal for a supply issue .
  • Quantum computing to advance medical predictive systems.
  • Using NLP for code generation to increase software development productivity.
  • Techfite firm’s emerging technology proposal .
  • Developing methods to make AI algorithms more transparent to users.
  • Investigating novel biometric authentication methods.
  • ElekTron Company’s network design proposal .
  • Methods to detect and mitigate biases in AI systems.
  • Usability in computer interface to ensure effective human-computer interactions.
  • Advanced education in computational science .
  • 3D object modeling to improve the architecture of large cities.
  • The use of one programming language to cut the costs of programming training.
  • Computer technologies to be installed at TVU Hotel .
  • Constant feedback to minimize algorithmic bias in AI technologies.
  • The use of computers to sequence human genes.
  • Data science in the energy management field .
  • Using machine learning for optimizing traffic flow in a smart city.
  • AI-based approaches to the early detection and mitigation of cyber threats.
  • The development of an information system to support inventory management .
  • The use of AI in automatic data analysis.
  • Web-based monitoring to improve healthcare services.
  • Scrum methodology to develop Agile software.

Interesting Proposal Essay Topics for Agriculture

  • The use of social media to improve agricultural marketing.
  • How China’s agricultural reform contributed to its success on economic growth .
  • Organic farming to minimize pollution from agriculture.
  • Farmer organizations to implement effective agricultural transformation procedures.
  • Financial profile of Oman Agriculture Development Company SAOG .
  • Increased availability of fertile land to prevent the agricultural land shortage.
  • Modern farming technology to solve the issue of inadequate drainage.
  • Obstacles and barriers of AIS in agriculture companies .
  • The use of antibiotics alternatives in animal agriculture for public health.
  • E-commerce platforms to promote farming on social media.
  • Al Ain Poultry Farm: management strategy and policy .
  • The incorporation of ecological practices into agricultural systems to protect the planet.
  • Maintaining ground cover to restore soil health and biodiversity.
  • Case study of Holly Farm: problems and solutions .
  • Farmers’ collaborations to maintain knowledge and resource sharing.
  • New technologies for storage of agricultural products.
  • Competitive advantage in farming, car, and restaurant industries .
  • Organic materials to recycle nutrients within the agricultural ecosystem.
  • Alternative farming methods to provide efficient resource use.
  • Political argument on farm subsidies .
  • Anti-discrimination policies to expand the rights of women in the agricultural sector.
  • Online podcasts to build trustful relationships between farmers and consumers.
  • Quillstine Farm’s start-up business plan .
  • Conserving genetic variety in crops and livestock for future resilience.
  • Increasing investment to address a lack of modern farming equipment.
  • Business plan: integrated farming .
  • Favoring crop rotation over monoculture farming to save natural habitats.
  • Waste management to cut down on agriculture’s environmental footprint.
  • State farm: addressing problematic intersections .
  • The use of mulch and cover crops to protect soil from wind and water erosion.

Proposal Topics for a History Paper

  • World War II lessons to prevent future conflicts.
  • The City of Dubai: history, development, and challenges .
  • Modern technology to restore the chronology of ancient events.
  • The lasting impact of the Silk Road on global trade.
  • History of supply chain management .
  • The evolution of democracy in Ancient Greece.
  • Anti-nationalism programs to prevent an imbalanced view of the past.
  • Major historical influences on Karl Marx’s materialist conception of history .
  • The impact of colonialism on indigenous cultures.
  • The evolution of human rights : from declaration to practice.
  • Corporate social responsibility and its historical background .
  • The history of urban legends and folklore: transmission and societal impact.
  • Environmental change and its impact on historical societies.
  • Management and its historical evolution .
  • The economic motivations and consequences of colonization.
  • The history of entertainment and its social influence.
  • Enron Company’s history of rise and fall .
  • Disinformation and misinformation campaigns throughout history.
  • The evolution of humanitarian aid and international relief efforts.
  • Islamic banking: history and economic crises .
  • Economic and social impact of pandemics throughout history.
  • The evolution of warfare ethics: from ancient codes to modern international law.
  • Justice is one of the key themes in human history .
  • The history of human-animal relationships and their cultural significance.
  • The Marshall Plan for European economic recovery post-WWII.
  • History of inclusion in early childhood education .
  • The influence of global trade routes on culinary traditions.
  • New historical approaches to overcome scientific doubt.
  • The history of Saudi Aramco from 1930 to 1940 .
  • AI technology to indicate fabricated historical documents.

😄 Funny Topics for Proposal Essays

Are you looking for funny proposal topics? Then, we have something for you! Read on to find some of the most outstanding ideas!

  • Mobile apps to prevent people from running into objects while they are texting.
  • Mindbody app: proposed business plan .
  • Mental exercises to increase student productivity at school.
  • Pavlov’s dog experiment to teach pets to use the toilet.
  • Financial proposal for ‘SILK’ hair protection gel .
  • The use of humor to reduce stress and depression.
  • Surviving Monday mornings: a comprehensive guide to coffee consumption.
  • Goals and features of a proposed school library .
  • Online monitoring to stop students’ procrastination.
  • Mini lie detector to get away with telling a white lie.
  • Business proposal for the Al-Yamamah College and JavaNet .
  • New device to ensure your shampoo and conditioner are at the same rate.
  • Plants and their role in reviving the space where you are working.
  • Marketing proposal for Bikemate .
  • The art of organization to protect the house from clutter.
  • AI kitchen appliances to ensure food safety.
  • Business plan for the proposed Chinese medicine clinic in Kuwait .
  • Rap music to make home tasks fun and effective.
  • Second hand to save budget from unplanned shopping.
  • Zetech Organization’s proposed change: strengths and weaknesses .
  • Funny mugs to throw a perfect tea party.
  • Online books to not die from boredom in the queue.

Proposal Title Ideas about Animals

  • The use of langur pee smell to protect New Delhi from monkeys.
  • Animal Foodland organization’s marketing plan .
  • Conducting a study on dogs’ understanding of human emotional cues.
  • Purchasing cruelty-free cosmetics to protect animals from being killed.
  • Woolly Mammoth project – mythical animal .
  • Animal adoption programs solve the problem of animal homelessness.
  • Spaying and neutering to solve the pet overpopulation issue.
  • Traveling by train among animals and plants .
  • Taking part in Animal Rescue Team training to help animals in crisis.
  • Veterinary care standards to improve conditions for animals in captivity.
  • Cosmetic and medical animal testing .
  • Establishing training programs to provide certificates of pet ownership.
  • Natural habitat rehabilitation to save endangered species.
  • Animal-based therapy overview and analysis .
  • Creating protected areas to safeguard oceanic biodiversity.
  • Responsible tourism to ensure wildlife safety and security.
  • Red fluorescent protein transgenic dogs experiment .
  • Global cooperation to stop illegal cross-border animal trafficking.
  • Education programs to raise awareness of animal conservation.
  • Business ethics decision situation in veterinary practice .
  • Supporting fur-free fashion to protect wildlife.
  • Encouraging TV talk shows to discuss animal issues.
  • China Southern Airlines and monkey transportation .

Proposal Paper Ideas about Sports

  • Developing a community-based sports initiative for physical fitness and health.
  • How does social media influence sports brands marketing ?
  • Education on sports ethics to create an inclusive environment in a team.
  • Anti-doping programs to reduce the cases of steroid use.
  • Sports marketing affected by the internet of things .
  • Financial rehabilitation services to help athletes with injuries.
  • Creating fitness programs for children to promote a culture of health.
  • Leadership in the sports club group .
  • Equal pay for female athletes in professional sports to stop discrimination.
  • Increasing access to sporting opportunities for people with disabilities.
  • Preparing to be an effective follower in sports .
  • Detailed protocols to prevent and manage dangerous situations in sports.
  • Equipment-sharing programs to make sports activities more affordable.
  • Kids and sports: lack of professional sports guides .
  • Physical education programs in the schools to promote healthy lifestyles.
  • Recovery strategies to prevent burnout and overtraining of athletes.
  • Balancing college sports and academic mission .
  • Supportive team program to assist athletes in coping with eating disorders .
  • Monitoring systems to ensure safe and sustainable workloads.
  • Advertising campaign for online sports nutrition store .
  • Sports psychologists and their role in helping athletes with mental toughness.
  • Sponsorship programs to reduce individual financial pressure in the sports industry.

Creating a well-developed structure is vital for any writing assignment. That’s why we’ve prepared a detailed template with the elements of a good proposal.

✍️ How to Make a Proposal Essay

Whether you are writing a proposal argument or a research proposal, the writing steps will be the same. Below are the steps you should take to complete this assignment.

This image shows how to write a proposal essay.

1. Choose Your Topic

Choosing a good topic is vital in writing a proposal essay. Select the subject you are interested in. This way, you’ll be more willing to invest your time and efforts into this project. In addition, ensure that your topic is narrow, specific, and significant. If your topic is too broad, reading background information can help you limit its scope.

2. Research

Find trustworthy sources with the information you can use to support your proposal. It will help you write the background section and highlight the importance of the problem. In addition, reliable sources will help you provide evidence justifying your chosen solution to the problem.

Developing a detailed outline helps ensure that your paper is logical and cohesive. The outline will let you see how you will link all of the facts to support the thesis statement. Also, it can save you time by identifying any gaps and weaknesses in your argument before you start writing your paper.

4. Draft Your Proposal Essay

When drafting your proposal, remember that it is a type of persuasive writing. It should present a project and encourage the reader to go along with a plan of action outlined in the paper. So, ensure your proposal is convincing, logical, and credible and considers the audience, purpose, and tone.

Start your essay by presenting the purpose and essence of your project. The main body of your proposal essay should contain background information on the problem and persuasive reasons to support your proposal. Finally, the conclusion should underline the significance of the issue and call the audience to action.

5. Revise and Edit

Carefully revise and edit your draft. Consider whether the problem is described concisely, the solution is complete, and your evidence is used appropriately. Also, read your work to find any grammar or spelling mistakes. If you still have doubts about your paper, you can ask your professor or classmate to read it and give their feedback.

📃 Sample of a Proposal Essay

To help you understand how a proposal essay is structured, we’ve prepared a topic proposal example. Check it out!

Equipping Schools with Recycling Bins for Environmental Preservation

The purpose of this proposal is to implement a school-wide recycling program by strategically placing recycling bins across the campus. This initiative will promote zero waste culture, ensure the school’s sustainability, and contribute to environmental preservation.

The school is a perfect place to develop environmental awareness because it has the opportunity to build students’ knowledge and skills necessary to address environmental issues. One way to do so is to teach students to avoid improper waste disposal through recycling.

The proposal involves procuring and placing recycling bins across the school, including classrooms, common areas, and outdoor spaces. In addition, educational campaigns will be held to raise awareness among students, staff, and parents about the significance of waste segregation and recycling. Regular monitoring and evaluation will ensure the program’s effectiveness.

Several problems may arise while implementing this project, including resistance to change and logistical concerns about bin placement. Some may also object to the proposal due to the costs associated with it. However, the resistance to change can be mitigated by educational campaigns. The bin placement problem can be solved by involving staff and students in determining the optimal locations for recycling bins. Finally, financial constraints can be addressed by seeking partnerships with local businesses and community organizations.

Equipping the school with recycling bins is a step toward a sustainable future. By reducing waste and promoting sustainable practices, our school can lead by example and inspire positive changes within the community. This initiative gives a chance to raise environmentally conscious students and contribute to a healthier planet. Let us embrace this program to foster a sustainable school environment.

❓ Proposal Topics FAQ

How to write a proposal for an essay topic.

  • Choose a topic.
  • Identify your thesis or research question.
  • Look for sources that you can use to support your thesis/research question.
  • Create a detailed outline.
  • Write the first draft.
  • Edit the finished paper to fix grammar or spelling mistakes and ensure coherence.

How to write a proposal essay introduction?

Start with an attention-grabbing hook to pique your audience’s curiosity. Then, summarize the details of the problem and outline the purpose of your proposed project. Finally, add a strong thesis statement, summarizing your suggested solution and giving a preview of your supporting arguments.

How to write a proposal argument essay?

  • Summarize the details of the problem and present the thesis.
  • Give a detailed history of the problem.
  • Present your proposal in detail.
  • Examine the contrasting viewpoints.
  • Sum up the main points of your essay.

What to write a proposal essay on?

Since you advocate for a change or a solution to a problem in your proposal essay, you should choose a topic you care about. You can write a proposal essay on virtually everything, from presenting a solution to climate change to implementing a community-based reading program or raising awareness about the importance of gut microbiota.

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Proposal Essay Examples: How to Write a Winning Proposal

Proposal Essay Examples: How to Write a Winning Proposal

Writing a proposal essay can be a challenging task for students, especially for those who are new to academic writing. Engwr 300, assigned by Professor Jackson, is a course that aims to help students develop their proposal writing skills and understand the key elements of a successful proposal. In this essay, we will explore the importance of proposal writing, discuss common mistakes to avoid, and provide three examples that demonstrate effective proposal writing techniques.

Before we dive into the examples, it’s crucial to understand why proposal writing is significant. Proposal essays allow students to present their ideas and solutions to real-world problems. Whether it’s addressing health issues, finding solutions to management problems, or solving homelessness, proposal essays give students the opportunity to showcase their research and analytical skills.

When it comes to structuring a proposal essay, students often face difficulties. They might struggle with organizing their thoughts, finding the right resources, or establishing a strong argument. However, with the proper guidance and tips, students can overcome these challenges and write winning proposals.

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One of the most common mistakes students make when writing a proposal essay is not conducting proper research. To build a strong argument and provide evidence for their proposals, students should take the time to gather statistical data, review academic resources, and search for relevant information on the topic they are addressing. By doing so, they can establish the significance of the issue and the need for their proposed solutions.

Another mistake students should avoid is not outlining their proposals. An outline helps in structuring the essay and ensures that the ideas flow logically. By having a clear outline, students can effectively organize their arguments, support them with evidence, and present a comprehensive proposal essay.

Now, let’s take a look at three proposal essay examples that demonstrate the key differences and similarities in writing styles, topics, and approaches. By reviewing these examples, students can get a better understanding of how to structure their own proposal essays and improve their chances of success.

How to Write a Winning Proposal

1. Understand the types of proposals: There are three main types of proposals – argumentative, causal, and problem-solution. Understanding the differences between them will help you establish the most appropriate approach for your proposal.

2. Do your research: Before you start writing your proposal, it is important to gather relevant information and data to support your arguments. Use reputable sources, such as academic journals or statistical data from government agencies, to strengthen your proposal’s credibility.

5. Provide a clear problem statement: Clearly define the problem you are addressing in your proposal. Use specific examples or real-life situations to illustrate the issue and its impact on the community or individuals involved.

6. Present your argument and solutions: Use logical reasoning and sound arguments to support your proposed solutions. Consider the potential objections or counterarguments and address them effectively in your proposal.

7. Avoid common mistakes: When writing a proposal, it is important to proofread and check for any grammatical or spelling errors. Follow the guidelines provided by your instructor or organization, and make sure your proposal adheres to the required formatting style.

8. Use a checklist: Before submitting your proposal, go through a checklist to ensure you have covered all the necessary elements. Check if your proposal addresses the problem, offers feasible solutions, and includes the required sections and supporting evidence.

9. Seek feedback: Share your proposal with peers or mentors for feedback and suggestions. They can provide valuable insights and help you improve your proposal before submitting it.

10. Learn from successful examples: Search for successful proposal essay examples online or in academic journals to get an idea of what works and what doesn’t. Analyze the structure, arguments, and writing style of those examples to enhance your own proposal.

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Key Differences Between Proposal Argument Essays and Proposal Essays

1. Background and Academic Significance: Proposal argument essays typically require the writer to have a strong background knowledge on the issue they are proposing a solution for. They need to establish their credibility and expertise on the topic in order to effectively argue their point. On the other hand, proposal essays can be written by anyone, regardless of their academic background, as long as they have a good understanding of the topic.

2. Types of Arguments: Proposal argument essays usually involve using logical, statistical, or causal arguments to persuade the reader. The writer needs to provide supporting evidence to back up their claims and convince the reader of the validity of their proposal. Proposal essays, on the other hand, may not necessarily involve arguments. They can be more descriptive in nature, focusing on explaining a problem and presenting potential solutions without necessarily attempting to persuade the reader.

3. Research and Finding Ideas: Both types of essays require research and finding ideas, but the focus is slightly different. In proposal argument essays, the writer needs to conduct thorough research to find evidence to support their arguments. They will need to search for relevant studies, articles, and data to build a strong case. In proposal essays, while research is still important, the focus is more on finding creative and innovative solutions to the problem at hand.

5. Mistakes to Avoid: When writing proposal argument essays, it’s important to avoid common mistakes such as using emotional appeals instead of logical arguments, failing to address counterarguments, or not providing enough evidence to support the claims. In proposal essays, the main mistake to avoid is not providing enough context or background information about the problem being addressed.

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6. Tips for Success: Regardless of the type of proposal essay you are writing, there are several tips that can help you achieve success. These include clearly defining the problem, proposing feasible and realistic solutions, and providing evidence or examples to support your proposals. It’s also important to consider the audience and their concerns when crafting your proposals.

7. Examples and Workshop: If you’re having trouble starting your proposal essay or need inspiration, you can find examples of proposal essays and proposal argument essays online. There are also writing workshops and resources available that can guide you through the process of writing a successful proposal essay.

Proposal Essay Checklist

  • Establish the significance of the issue: Begin by clearly explaining the problem or issue you will address in your proposal. This will help your readers to understand why your proposal is important.
  • Research your topic: Conduct thorough research to gather background information on your topic. Use reputable sources such as academic journals, books, or reliable websites like Google Scholar.
  • Build a strong argument: Your proposal should have a clear and logical argument that addresses the issue. Use examples, facts, and statistics to support your claims and convince the readers of your proposal’s validity.
  • Propose solutions or ideas: Your proposal should offer concrete solutions or ideas to solve the problem. These solutions should be practical and feasible.
  • Outline your proposal: Create a clear and well-structured outline for your proposal. This will help you organize your thoughts and ensure that all the necessary components are included.
  • Review and revise: After writing your proposal, take the time to review and revise it. Check for any spelling or grammatical mistakes, and ensure that your ideas flow smoothly.
  • Follow the assignment guidelines: Make sure you understand the requirements and guidelines for the proposal essay. Pay attention to the word count, formatting, and any specific instructions provided by your instructor.
  • Differentiate between types of proposals: Understand the differences between argumentative, causal, and other types of proposals. This will help you structure your proposal appropriately.
  • Avoid common mistakes: Be aware of common mistakes students make when writing proposals, such as lack of evidence, weak arguments, or failure to address counterarguments. Try to avoid these pitfalls in your proposal.
  • Seek feedback and edit: Share your proposal with a peer, professor, or utilize the resources available at your school’s writing center. Getting feedback will improve your proposal and increase its chances of success.

Following this checklist will help you write a well-structured and persuasive proposal essay. Remember to stay focused on the topic, provide strong arguments, and propose realistic solutions. With proper research and planning, your proposal essay can make a significant impact in the academic and management world.

Tips for Success in Writing Proposal Essay Examples

Writing a proposal essay can be a challenging task, but with the right tips and strategies, you can achieve success. Here are some guidelines to help you structure and write a winning proposal essay:

By following these tips, you can better structure your written proposal essay and increase your chances of success. Remember to review your work carefully and seek feedback from peers or instructors. Writing a strong proposal essay requires time, effort, and attention to detail, but the results are well worth it.

Structuring Your Proposal Essay

1. understand the assignment.

Before you start writing your proposal essay, it is important to understand the requirements and expectations of the assignment. Read the assigned topic carefully and make sure you have a clear understanding of what needs to be done.

2. Choose a topic of significance

While sometimes you may be assigned a specific topic, most of the time you have the freedom to choose your own. Take the time to brainstorm and research potential topics of significance. For instance, if you are taking a health management course, you can write a proposal essay on improving health services for the homeless on campus.

3. Do your research

Once you have chosen a topic, you need to gather relevant information and examples to support your argument. Conduct thorough research using academic resources, statistical review, and other credible sources to back up your proposal.

4. Build a strong argument

Your proposal essay should present a clear and logical argument. Present your ideas in a structured manner, making sure each paragraph flows smoothly into the next. Use evidence and examples to back up your claims and convince your readers of your proposed solution.

5. Write an outline

Before you start drafting your proposal essay, create an outline that organizes your main points and supporting evidence. An outline helps you stay focused and ensures you include all the necessary information in your essay.

6. Avoid common mistakes

While writing your proposal essay, be aware of common mistakes that students often make. For example, make sure to use proper grammar and spelling, and avoid using slang or informal language. Also, be mindful of the tone and style of your writing, keeping it professional and academic.

7. Check for coherence and structure

After you have written your proposal essay, review it to ensure that your arguments flow logically and coherently. Make sure each paragraph builds upon the previous one and supports your overall argument. Edit and revise as necessary to improve the structure of your essay.

By following these tips and guidelines, you can effectively structure your proposal essay and increase your chances of success. Remember to always check the assignment guidelines and seek feedback from your instructor. Happy writing!

Causal Essay Outline

  • Identifying the causal relationships: Clearly identify the cause-and-effect relationships you will be discussing in your essay. Use clear and concise language to describe each relationship.
  • Providing evidence and examples: To support your arguments, provide relevant evidence and examples. Use statistics, research findings, and real-life examples to strengthen your arguments and make them more convincing.
  • Exploring the significance: Discuss the significance of the causal relationships you have identified. Explain why it is important to understand these relationships and how they impact the topic or issue you are discussing.
  • Addressing counterarguments: Anticipate and address counterarguments to strengthen your essay. Acknowledge and refute opposing viewpoints to show that your arguments are well-supported and credible.

When writing a causal essay, it’s important to avoid common mistakes. Here are three key tips to keep in mind:

  • Don’t confuse causation with correlation: Make sure you clearly differentiate between events that are causally related and those that merely have a correlation.
  • Avoid oversimplifying complex issues: Causal relationships are often multifaceted, so be sure to thoroughly analyze and consider all relevant factors.
  • Back up your arguments with reliable sources: Use credible and authoritative sources to support your claims and ensure the validity of your arguments.

By following these guidelines and avoiding common mistakes, you can write a well-structured and persuasive causal essay. Remember to review your work thoroughly and seek feedback from peers or instructors to ensure the success of your essay.

What is a proposal essay?

A proposal essay is a type of academic writing that suggests a solution to a problem or presents an idea for consideration. It aims to convince the reader of the importance of the proposed solution or idea.

What are some common mistakes to avoid in a proposal essay?

Some common mistakes to avoid in a proposal essay include not providing enough evidence, ignoring counterarguments, not addressing the reader’s concerns, having a weak thesis statement, and lacking a clear structure.

What are the key differences between proposal argument essays and proposal essays?

The key difference between proposal argument essays and proposal essays is the type of argument used. Proposal argument essays focus on presenting an argument and persuading the reader, while proposal essays focus on presenting an idea or solution.

Which type of essay should I write, a proposal argument essay or a proposal essay?

The type of essay you should write depends on your goal. If you want to convince the reader of your argument, then a proposal argument essay is suitable. If you want to present an idea or solution without necessarily persuading the reader, then a proposal essay is more appropriate.

Can you provide examples of proposal essays?

Yes, here are a few examples of proposal essays: “Implementing Recycling Programs in Schools”, “Improving Public Transportation in Urban Areas”, and “Promoting Healthy Eating Habits in Children”.

A proposal essay is a type of academic writing in which the writer presents an argument and proposes a solution or course of action for a specific problem or issue. It aims to persuade the readers to accept the proposed idea or take action based on the argument presented.

The key difference between proposal argument essays and proposal essays lies in the type of argument used. In a proposal argument essay, the writer presents a problem and argues for a particular solution. In a proposal essay, the writer presents a problem or issue and proposes a solution or course of action without necessarily arguing for it.

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Alex Koliada, PhD, is a well-known doctor. He is famous for studying aging, genetics, and other medical conditions. He works at the Institute of Food Biotechnology and Genomics. His scientific research has been published in the most reputable international magazines. Alex holds a BA in English and Comparative Literature from the University of Southern California , and a TEFL certification from The Boston Language Institute.

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Proposal Essay Examples to Inspire Change

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Understanding Proposal Essay Examples

Benefits of Innovative Solutions

Example 1: "revolutionizing waste management: a sustainable approach for a greener future", example 2: "empowering rural communities: bridging the digital divide through ai-enabled connectivity", drawing inspiration from proposal essays.

Imagine a world where groundbreaking ideas transform societies, where innovative solutions address complex problems, and where individuals have the power to inspire change. Such a world is not just a distant dream; it is within our grasp through the persuasive power of proposals. Proposal essay examples serve as beacons of inspiration, showcasing the potential of well-crafted proposals to ignite transformation and revolutionize the status quo.

In this article, we will explore the significance of proposal essay examples in inspiring innovative solutions. We will delve into the art of persuasive writing, discovering how proposals can captivate hearts and minds, and propel us towards a future of progress and positive change. Through a collection of compelling examples, we will unravel the strategies and techniques that make proposals powerful catalysts for innovation.

So, fasten your seatbelts and get ready to embark on a journey that will open your eyes to the possibilities that lie within the realm of proposals. Together with free essay typer , we will unlock the secrets of persuasive writing and draw inspiration from examples of a proposal essay that have reshaped industries, influenced policies, and left an indelible mark on our world.

In the following sections, we will explore the different elements of proposal essays, dissect the benefits of innovative solutions, and dive into two captivating examples that have sparked change. By the end of this article, you will not only gain a deeper understanding of the power of proposals but also be equipped with the tools to craft your own persuasive essays that inspire transformation.

So, let us embark on this enlightening journey, where the realm of proposal essays intersects with the realm of innovation, and where the seeds of change are sown through the power of persuasive writing. Together, we will uncover the potential that lies within each of us to shape a better future through the art of proposals.

Understanding Proposal Essay Examples:

Proposal essays serve as powerful tools for advocating ideas, solutions, or courses of action. They are a specific form of persuasive writing designed to convince readers of the validity and effectiveness of a proposed plan. These essays go beyond simply presenting an issue; they offer concrete proposals and strategies to address the problem at hand.

The purpose of a proposal essay is to persuade readers to embrace a particular idea or take action based on the proposed solution. These essays aim to spark change, influence decision-makers, and inspire individuals to support a cause. By presenting a well-reasoned argument, backed by evidence and logical reasoning, proposal essays can have a significant impact on shaping opinions and driving positive transformations.

Persuasive writing lies at the heart of proposal essays. It requires the writer to effectively communicate their ideas, convince readers of their validity, and inspire action. The art of persuasion involves appealing to emotions, logic, and credibility to sway the audience's perspective. Examples of a proposal essay - employ various persuasive techniques, such as logical reasoning, compelling evidence, and rhetorical devices, to make a convincing case for the proposed solution.

Proposal essays play a crucial role in driving change because they provide concrete plans of action. They offer innovative and practical solutions to address pressing issues in fields ranging from education and healthcare to environmental sustainability and social justice. By presenting well-researched proposals, these essays demonstrate a commitment to finding tangible solutions and inspire others to join the cause.

Innovative solutions hold immense value in addressing complex problems and propelling progress in various fields. Proposal essays play a crucial role in showcasing the potential of these solutions and inspiring individuals and organizations to take action. Let's explore the benefits of innovative solutions and how proposal essays can spark creativity and encourage critical thinking.

One of the primary benefits of innovative solutions is their ability to tackle complex problems that traditional methods have failed to address adequately. By thinking outside the box and challenging established norms, innovative solutions provide fresh perspectives and alternative approaches. Proposal essays serve as a platform for presenting these solutions, offering detailed plans and strategies to address the underlying issues.

In addition to problem-solving, innovative solutions have the power to drive progress by introducing transformative change. They have the potential to revolutionize industries, improve efficiency, and enhance outcomes. Proposal essays serve as a catalyst for this change by effectively communicating the vision and potential impact of the proposed solution. Through well-crafted arguments and persuasive language, these essays inspire individuals and organizations to embrace innovative ideas and turn them into reality.

One of the remarkable aspects of proposal essays is their ability to spark creativity. When writers embark on the journey of crafting a proposal essay, they delve deep into research, explore different perspectives, and generate unique ideas. This process of seeking innovative solutions encourages creative thinking and fosters an environment of exploration and discovery. Proposal essays push boundaries, encouraging writers to think beyond conventional limits and consider novel approaches to existing problems.

Furthermore, proposal essays promote critical thinking by requiring writers to analyze the problem, evaluate potential solutions, and present well-reasoned arguments. The process of developing a proposal necessitates thorough research, data analysis, and careful consideration of the potential implications and limitations of the proposed solution. This engagement with critical thinking strengthens the writer's ability to assess complex situations, weigh different options, and make informed decisions.

In this example proposal essay, we will explore a groundbreaking solution that aims to revolutionize waste management practices and contribute to a greener future. The proposal focuses on implementing an innovative waste management system that combines advanced technologies, community engagement, and sustainable practices.

The significance of this proposed solution lies in its potential to address the pressing environmental challenges posed by inefficient waste management systems. Conventional waste management practices often lead to pollution, resource depletion, and negative impacts on ecosystems. This proposal aims to transform the current approach by introducing a comprehensive system that promotes recycling, waste reduction, and responsible disposal.

By implementing advanced technologies such as smart waste bins, Internet of Things (IoT) sensors, and artificial intelligence, the proposed solution optimizes waste collection processes, reduces operational costs, and enhances efficiency. This innovative approach not only improves waste management practices but also minimizes environmental harm by diverting waste from landfills and promoting recycling and upcycling.

The proposal challenges conventional thinking by emphasizing the importance of community engagement and public education. It recognizes that effective waste management requires the active participation of individuals, businesses, and local communities. The proposal includes initiatives such as educational campaigns, recycling awareness programs, and community-based collection centers to foster a sense of responsibility and empower individuals to make sustainable choices.

Moreover, the proposal explores the integration of circular economy principles into waste management practices. It encourages the transformation of waste into valuable resources through initiatives such as composting, energy recovery from organic waste, and the promotion of eco-friendly products. This innovative approach shifts the focus from a linear "take-make-dispose" model to a circular system that promotes resource conservation, reduces waste generation, and creates economic opportunities.

In this example proposal essay, we delve into a transformative solution that aims to bridge the digital divide and empower rural communities through AI-enabled connectivity. The proposal focuses on leveraging artificial intelligence (AI) technologies and innovative infrastructure to provide reliable internet access and digital resources to underserved rural areas.

The objective of this proposal is to address the persistent problem of limited internet connectivity in rural communities, which hinders access to educational, economic, and social opportunities. The proposed solution seeks to close this gap by implementing a comprehensive framework that combines AI algorithms, satellite technology, and community-driven initiatives.

What sets this proposal apart is its unique approach to leveraging AI for enhancing connectivity. AI algorithms can optimize the allocation of available bandwidth, prioritize data traffic, and predict usage patterns, thus ensuring efficient and equitable access for all users in rural areas. By dynamically managing network resources, the proposed solution can provide a reliable and seamless internet experience, despite the challenges of limited infrastructure.

The proposal recognizes that sustainable change requires community involvement and partnerships. It emphasizes the importance of engaging local stakeholders, such as community leaders, educators, and businesses, to develop tailored solutions that address the specific needs and challenges of rural areas. This approach encourages community ownership, collaboration, and a sense of empowerment, fostering sustainable development and growth.

The potential benefits and transformative effects of this proposed solution are vast. First and foremost, it empowers rural communities by providing equal access to educational resources, online learning platforms, and digital skills training. This enables individuals in rural areas to acquire knowledge, expand their opportunities, and participate in the digital economy.

Moreover, improved connectivity has the potential to boost economic development in rural areas. It facilitates e-commerce, remote work opportunities, and access to online markets, empowering local businesses and entrepreneurs. The proposed solution also enhances healthcare access through telemedicine services, allowing individuals in remote areas to receive virtual medical consultations and access vital healthcare information.

Additionally, the proposal fosters social inclusion by connecting rural communities with the rest of the world. It enables individuals to stay connected with friends and family, access social media platforms, and engage in online communities, thus reducing social isolation and strengthening social bonds.

Proposal essays serve as powerful tools for driving change and inspiring innovation. To understand their effectiveness and derive inspiration, let's explore the key elements and strategies used in these essays. We'll highlight the importance of research, evidence, clear communication, and persuasive techniques in crafting compelling proposals. Ultimately, we encourage readers to consider proposal essay writing as a means to drive change in their respective fields.

One of the fundamental elements of a successful proposal essay is thorough research. Effective proposals are built on a solid foundation of knowledge and understanding of the problem at hand. Writers delve into extensive research, analyzing existing literature, gathering data, and exploring different perspectives. This deep understanding allows them to identify gaps, challenges, and potential solutions, which form the basis of their proposals.

Another essential aspect of compelling proposal essays is the use of evidence. Concrete evidence, whether in the form of statistical data, expert opinions, or case studies, provides credibility and strengthens the argument presented. Incorporating relevant and reliable evidence not only reinforces the proposal's validity but also instills confidence in the readers, persuading them to consider the proposed solution seriously.

Clear communication is paramount in proposal essays. Writers must articulate their ideas in a concise and organized manner, ensuring that readers can easily grasp the proposal's objective and the steps proposed to address the issue. Effective proposals use logical structures, coherent arguments, and engaging language to captivate the reader's attention and maintain their interest throughout the essay. By presenting ideas in a clear and compelling way, proposal essays can leave a lasting impact on the reader.

Persuasive techniques are vital in proposal essays to win over the audience and inspire action. Writers employ various rhetorical devices, such as ethos, pathos, and logos, to appeal to the reader's emotions, logic, and credibility. Engaging storytelling, powerful anecdotes, and persuasive language can evoke empathy, ignite passion, and motivate readers to support the proposed solution. By carefully crafting their arguments and employing persuasive techniques, writers can influence the reader's perspective and drive them to take action.

Proposal essays have the potential to inspire readers to consider innovative solutions in their respective fields. By presenting well-reasoned arguments, supporting evidence, and a clear vision for change, these essays demonstrate the power of innovative thinking and propose tangible ways to address pressing issues. Readers can draw inspiration from the creativity, critical thinking, and research showcased in proposal essays, applying similar approaches to their own challenges and fields of interest.

In this article, we have explored the significance of proposal essays in inspiring innovative solutions. We discussed their purpose in advocating ideas, solutions, or courses of action and highlighted the role of persuasive writing in driving change. By examining specific proposal essay examples, we witnessed the transformative power of proposals in addressing complex problems and challenging conventional thinking.

We learned that proposal essays serve as catalysts for change by sparking creativity, encouraging critical thinking, and inspiring individuals and organizations to take action. Through thorough research, the use of evidence, clear communication, and persuasive techniques, these essays present compelling arguments and offer fresh perspectives on pressing issues.

To further explore the potential of proposal essays, we encourage readers to delve into a diverse range of proposal essay examples. These examples serve as sources of inspiration and provide insights into innovative approaches in various fields. By studying the key elements and strategies employed in these essays, readers can apply similar principles to their own endeavors and advocate for positive change.

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How to Write a Research Proposal | Examples & Templates

Published on 30 October 2022 by Shona McCombes and Tegan George. Revised on 13 June 2023.

Structure of a research proposal

A research proposal describes what you will investigate, why it’s important, and how you will conduct your research.

The format of a research proposal varies between fields, but most proposals will contain at least these elements:

Introduction

Literature review.

  • Research design

Reference list

While the sections may vary, the overall objective is always the same. A research proposal serves as a blueprint and guide for your research plan, helping you get organised and feel confident in the path forward you choose to take.

Table of contents

Research proposal purpose, research proposal examples, research design and methods, contribution to knowledge, research schedule, frequently asked questions.

Academics often have to write research proposals to get funding for their projects. As a student, you might have to write a research proposal as part of a grad school application , or prior to starting your thesis or dissertation .

In addition to helping you figure out what your research can look like, a proposal can also serve to demonstrate why your project is worth pursuing to a funder, educational institution, or supervisor.

Research proposal length

The length of a research proposal can vary quite a bit. A bachelor’s or master’s thesis proposal can be just a few pages, while proposals for PhD dissertations or research funding are usually much longer and more detailed. Your supervisor can help you determine the best length for your work.

One trick to get started is to think of your proposal’s structure as a shorter version of your thesis or dissertation , only without the results , conclusion and discussion sections.

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Writing a research proposal can be quite challenging, but a good starting point could be to look at some examples. We’ve included a few for you below.

  • Example research proposal #1: ‘A Conceptual Framework for Scheduling Constraint Management’
  • Example research proposal #2: ‘ Medical Students as Mediators of Change in Tobacco Use’

Like your dissertation or thesis, the proposal will usually have a title page that includes:

  • The proposed title of your project
  • Your supervisor’s name
  • Your institution and department

The first part of your proposal is the initial pitch for your project. Make sure it succinctly explains what you want to do and why.

Your introduction should:

  • Introduce your topic
  • Give necessary background and context
  • Outline your  problem statement  and research questions

To guide your introduction , include information about:

  • Who could have an interest in the topic (e.g., scientists, policymakers)
  • How much is already known about the topic
  • What is missing from this current knowledge
  • What new insights your research will contribute
  • Why you believe this research is worth doing

As you get started, it’s important to demonstrate that you’re familiar with the most important research on your topic. A strong literature review  shows your reader that your project has a solid foundation in existing knowledge or theory. It also shows that you’re not simply repeating what other people have already done or said, but rather using existing research as a jumping-off point for your own.

In this section, share exactly how your project will contribute to ongoing conversations in the field by:

  • Comparing and contrasting the main theories, methods, and debates
  • Examining the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches
  • Explaining how will you build on, challenge, or synthesise prior scholarship

Following the literature review, restate your main  objectives . This brings the focus back to your own project. Next, your research design or methodology section will describe your overall approach, and the practical steps you will take to answer your research questions.

To finish your proposal on a strong note, explore the potential implications of your research for your field. Emphasise again what you aim to contribute and why it matters.

For example, your results might have implications for:

  • Improving best practices
  • Informing policymaking decisions
  • Strengthening a theory or model
  • Challenging popular or scientific beliefs
  • Creating a basis for future research

Last but not least, your research proposal must include correct citations for every source you have used, compiled in a reference list . To create citations quickly and easily, you can use our free APA citation generator .

Some institutions or funders require a detailed timeline of the project, asking you to forecast what you will do at each stage and how long it may take. While not always required, be sure to check the requirements of your project.

Here’s an example schedule to help you get started. You can also download a template at the button below.

Download our research schedule template

If you are applying for research funding, chances are you will have to include a detailed budget. This shows your estimates of how much each part of your project will cost.

Make sure to check what type of costs the funding body will agree to cover. For each item, include:

  • Cost : exactly how much money do you need?
  • Justification : why is this cost necessary to complete the research?
  • Source : how did you calculate the amount?

To determine your budget, think about:

  • Travel costs : do you need to go somewhere to collect your data? How will you get there, and how much time will you need? What will you do there (e.g., interviews, archival research)?
  • Materials : do you need access to any tools or technologies?
  • Help : do you need to hire any research assistants for the project? What will they do, and how much will you pay them?

Once you’ve decided on your research objectives , you need to explain them in your paper, at the end of your problem statement.

Keep your research objectives clear and concise, and use appropriate verbs to accurately convey the work that you will carry out for each one.

I will compare …

A research aim is a broad statement indicating the general purpose of your research project. It should appear in your introduction at the end of your problem statement , before your research objectives.

Research objectives are more specific than your research aim. They indicate the specific ways you’ll address the overarching aim.

A PhD, which is short for philosophiae doctor (doctor of philosophy in Latin), is the highest university degree that can be obtained. In a PhD, students spend 3–5 years writing a dissertation , which aims to make a significant, original contribution to current knowledge.

A PhD is intended to prepare students for a career as a researcher, whether that be in academia, the public sector, or the private sector.

A master’s is a 1- or 2-year graduate degree that can prepare you for a variety of careers.

All master’s involve graduate-level coursework. Some are research-intensive and intend to prepare students for further study in a PhD; these usually require their students to write a master’s thesis . Others focus on professional training for a specific career.

Critical thinking refers to the ability to evaluate information and to be aware of biases or assumptions, including your own.

Like information literacy , it involves evaluating arguments, identifying and solving problems in an objective and systematic way, and clearly communicating your ideas.

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How To Write A Proposal Essay In 2023?

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Table of Contents

How To Write A Proposal Essay (Writing Guide)

  • How to start a proposal essay
  • How to write body for a proposal essay
  • How to conclude a proposal essay
  • Outline example

Briefly, a proposal essay is an essay which puts forward an original idea, and then defends it through the use of well-backed up research and personal opinion combined to try and persuade whoever is reading it of the advantages\disadvantages of the idea.

Proposals are mainly found in three fields: education (it is a good way to teach and learn critical thinking), business (as a way of showing why particular moves would be a bad idea, or a good one, respectively), and economics, for much the same reason. This of course does not mean that they are limited to these areas – proposal essay writing is something which can be useful for many fields.

How to Start a Proposal Essay

Much of the work which goes into a good proposal essay is done ahead of time; as the following paragraphs will show, being able to persuade others of your point of view is as much to do with the quality of the research being done, and the ways in which you pitch your argument as it does with the writing style.  Writing is (it should go without saying) important, but it can only do so much.

Knowing the audience for your work is incredibly important – the audience will determine the overall tone of the paper, as well as possibly influence the types of sources which can and should be used to back up the arguments made in the paper itself. For example, if the paper is aimed at business people, then arguments should revolve around the financial benefits or drawbacks of the situation being proposed. Alternatively, academics should be tackled by using strictly academic sources and previous academic theories , whether to agree with them or disagree.

Don’t skip over the research. This is the most important part of the process, even more so than having polished writing; less than stellar writing and good research will stand up to scrutiny far more easily than perfect writing and a lack of research will. Good research also makes it more likely that the essay will fulfill its purpose in persuading other people to the point of view it discusses.

Before writing the essay, start by creating a list of your ideas, and forming them into an outline . This outline does not need to be fixed, but it will you to organize your thoughts and the essay so that they both flow coherently in the writing.

An introduction in an essay is how you introduce the topic to whoever is reading. Not only is it the place to lay out the arguments which you will be relying on throughout the essay, but also gives space for any necessary history or important people to be mentioned and discussed before the actual essay begins. The introduction is possibly one of the most important parts of the essay, as it sets up what is to come, and begins the work of persuading people of a particular point of view by convincing them to read on. Outside of an educational setting, proposal essays are generally only written as a means of solving a problem or showing one potential way to solve a problem. Therefore, they highlight the problem which they are attempting to solve within the introduction itself, so as to ensure that the audience understands.

Essay Writing

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How to Write the Main Part of a Proposal Essay

An outline will be featured at the end of this article, which will show the relevant parts of a proposal essay – note that depending on the context, some parts may need to be taken out or rearranged to better suit what it is trying to convey.

The Proposal

The proposal should act as a statement of purpose, something which explains the purpose behind writing the essay.  It can be anything from a few lines long to an entire paragraph – it depends on the length of the essay itself – but it should contain the problem\opinion\topic which is under discussion, and an explanation of why it is worth debating.

Body Paragraph One – First Argument

This is the paragraph where you lay out your first argument for or against the proposal. Make sure that the writing is good, clear, and doesn’t go off into unnecessary tangents. Similarly, make sure that everything is referenced properly, and prepare to back up every argument (including any follow-up arguments) with well-checked facts.

Body Paragraph Two – Second Argument

This should be the same as above, except with an entirely new argument.

Body Paragraph Three – Third (Opposing) Argument

Again, this should be the same as above, although many people use it as a means of expressing an opposing opinion to the one they hold. It is entirely up to the writer as to how to use this paragraph, though it should be noted that devoting time to debunking the more common arguments or opposing opinions in the essay will tell the audience that the research into the problem has been thorough and well-done.

How to Conclude a Proposal Essay

The conclusion should not be a simple re-statement of the introduction, with all of the relevant history and essay points, but it should contain some elements of it all. You should include just enough to serve as a reminder of why the proposal was deemed appropriate in the first place, without any in-depth knowledge of the introduction. The main arguments being made in your proposal should also be reiterated. Once this is done, there are two ways in which a proposal essay can be ended, and it depends on what type of proposal essay was being written. If the proposal essay was written in an educational setting, then the conclusion should wrap up all the research done and deliver the final conclusion, along with any last pieces of information which might be appropriate at this stage. The other kind of proposal essay, the one did in a professional setting, should have several more strands to it.

For people who are giving a professional proposal essay : state the goal of the proposal, just to ensure that everybody who reads the essay knows what it is handling, and then focus on why the proposal will work, with reference to any previous moves in this direction, or any potential assets to the proposal which would particularly suit your audience.

Outline Example

  • It should be banned because it goes against the family-friendly nature of the paper
  • It should be banned because it is overall degrading, and outdated
  • It should not be banned because the women gave their consent to be photographed that way.
  • Proposal – page three is something that should be banned because it is an outdated feature of the newspaper which blatantly goes against the nature of the paper as stated by its publishers. It has no place in a society that claims to view men and women as equal.
  • Body paragraph one – the Sun claims that it is family-friendly, so what message is the topless woman sending to the family, and specifically, to children? It teaches boys that women should be related to sex objects, it teaches girls that they should be okay with being related to a sex object.
  • Body paragraph two – women are supposed to be seen as equals in our society, but there are no corresponding naked men features, so the topless women become one more part of our ‘sex-sells’ culture. This is degrading to women who want to be more than that.
  • Body paragraph three – the women in question are presumably over the age of consent and therefore chose to be photographed like this. Is it not degrading to take their choice away from them?
  • Reiterate the proposal
  • Go over the main arguments
  • Come to an overall conclusion.

proposal for essay example

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Research Proposal Example/Sample

Detailed Walkthrough + Free Proposal Template

If you’re getting started crafting your research proposal and are looking for a few examples of research proposals , you’ve come to the right place.

In this video, we walk you through two successful (approved) research proposals , one for a Master’s-level project, and one for a PhD-level dissertation. We also start off by unpacking our free research proposal template and discussing the four core sections of a research proposal, so that you have a clear understanding of the basics before diving into the actual proposals.

  • Research proposal example/sample – Master’s-level (PDF/Word)
  • Research proposal example/sample – PhD-level (PDF/Word)
  • Proposal template (Fully editable) 

If you’re working on a research proposal for a dissertation or thesis, you may also find the following useful:

  • Research Proposal Bootcamp : Learn how to write a research proposal as efficiently and effectively as possible
  • 1:1 Proposal Coaching : Get hands-on help with your research proposal

Free Webinar: How To Write A Research Proposal

FAQ: Research Proposal Example

Research proposal example: frequently asked questions, are the sample proposals real.

Yes. The proposals are real and were approved by the respective universities.

Can I copy one of these proposals for my own research?

As we discuss in the video, every research proposal will be slightly different, depending on the university’s unique requirements, as well as the nature of the research itself. Therefore, you’ll need to tailor your research proposal to suit your specific context.

You can learn more about the basics of writing a research proposal here .

How do I get the research proposal template?

You can access our free proposal template here .

Is the proposal template really free?

Yes. There is no cost for the proposal template and you are free to use it as a foundation for your research proposal.

Where can I learn more about proposal writing?

For self-directed learners, our Research Proposal Bootcamp is a great starting point.

For students that want hands-on guidance, our private coaching service is recommended.

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This post is an extract from our bestselling Udemy Course, Research Proposal Bootcamp . If you want to work smart, you don't want to miss this .

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Kindly guide me through writing a good proposal on the thesis topic; Impact of Artificial Intelligence on Financial Inclusion in Nigeria. Thank you

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EU AI Act: first regulation on artificial intelligence

The use of artificial intelligence in the EU will be regulated by the AI Act, the world’s first comprehensive AI law. Find out how it will protect you.

A man faces a computer generated figure with programming language in the background

As part of its digital strategy , the EU wants to regulate artificial intelligence (AI) to ensure better conditions for the development and use of this innovative technology. AI can create many benefits , such as better healthcare; safer and cleaner transport; more efficient manufacturing; and cheaper and more sustainable energy.

In April 2021, the European Commission proposed the first EU regulatory framework for AI. It says that AI systems that can be used in different applications are analysed and classified according to the risk they pose to users. The different risk levels will mean more or less regulation. Once approved, these will be the world’s first rules on AI.

Learn more about what artificial intelligence is and how it is used

What Parliament wants in AI legislation

Parliament’s priority is to make sure that AI systems used in the EU are safe, transparent, traceable, non-discriminatory and environmentally friendly. AI systems should be overseen by people, rather than by automation, to prevent harmful outcomes.

Parliament also wants to establish a technology-neutral, uniform definition for AI that could be applied to future AI systems.

Learn more about Parliament’s work on AI and its vision for AI’s future

AI Act: different rules for different risk levels

The new rules establish obligations for providers and users depending on the level of risk from artificial intelligence. While many AI systems pose minimal risk, they need to be assessed.

Unacceptable risk

Unacceptable risk AI systems are systems considered a threat to people and will be banned. They include:

  • Cognitive behavioural manipulation of people or specific vulnerable groups: for example voice-activated toys that encourage dangerous behaviour in children
  • Social scoring: classifying people based on behaviour, socio-economic status or personal characteristics
  • Biometric identification and categorisation of people
  • Real-time and remote biometric identification systems, such as facial recognition

Some exceptions may be allowed for law enforcement purposes. “Real-time” remote biometric identification systems will be allowed in a limited number of serious cases, while “post” remote biometric identification systems, where identification occurs after a significant delay, will be allowed to prosecute serious crimes and only after court approval.

AI systems that negatively affect safety or fundamental rights will be considered high risk and will be divided into two categories:

1) AI systems that are used in products falling under the EU’s product safety legislation . This includes toys, aviation, cars, medical devices and lifts.

2) AI systems falling into specific areas that will have to be registered in an EU database:

  • Management and operation of critical infrastructure
  • Education and vocational training
  • Employment, worker management and access to self-employment
  • Access to and enjoyment of essential private services and public services and benefits
  • Law enforcement
  • Migration, asylum and border control management
  • Assistance in legal interpretation and application of the law.

All high-risk AI systems will be assessed before being put on the market and also throughout their lifecycle.

General purpose and generative AI

Generative AI, like ChatGPT, would have to comply with transparency requirements:

  • Disclosing that the content was generated by AI
  • Designing the model to prevent it from generating illegal content
  • Publishing summaries of copyrighted data used for training

High-impact general-purpose AI models that might pose systemic risk, such as the more advanced AI model GPT-4, would have to undergo thorough evaluations and any serious incidents would have to be reported to the European Commission.

Limited risk

Limited risk AI systems should comply with minimal transparency requirements that would allow users to make informed decisions. After interacting with the applications, the user can then decide whether they want to continue using it. Users should be made aware when they are interacting with AI. This includes AI systems that generate or manipulate image, audio or video content, for example deepfakes.

On December 9 2023, Parliament reached a provisional agreement with the Council on the AI act . The agreed text will now have to be formally adopted by both Parliament and Council to become EU law. Before all MEPs have their say on the agreement, Parliament’s internal market and civil liberties committees will vote on it.

More on the EU’s digital measures

  • Cryptocurrency dangers and the benefits of EU legislation
  • Fighting cybercrime: new EU cybersecurity laws explained
  • Boosting data sharing in the EU: what are the benefits?
  • EU Digital Markets Act and Digital Services Act
  • Five ways the European Parliament wants to protect online gamers
  • Artificial Intelligence Act

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IMAGES

  1. 005 Essay Example Proposal Proposals Examples ~ Thatsnotus

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  2. Understanding What a Thesis Proposal is and How to Write it

    proposal for essay example

  3. Written Proposal Template

    proposal for essay example

  4. 005 Essay Example Proposal Proposals Examples ~ Thatsnotus

    proposal for essay example

  5. 005 Essay Example Proposal Proposals Examples ~ Thatsnotus

    proposal for essay example

  6. 005 Essay Example Proposal Proposals Examples ~ Thatsnotus

    proposal for essay example

VIDEO

  1. DEFINITION EXAMPLE OF PROPOSAL

  2. Example writing a proposal with Copilot

COMMENTS

  1. How to Write a Proposal Essay/Paper

    Deya Writes Updated: Sep 15, 2023 10:04 PM EDT This article will go over how to write an effective proposal essay and provide a sample that was actually submitted and implemented. What Is a Proposal Essay?

  2. How to Write a Research Proposal

    Filling a gap in the existing body of research on their subject Underscoring existing research on their subject, and/or Adding new, original knowledge to the academic community's existing understanding of their subject

  3. Academic Proposals

    For samples of academic proposals, click here. Important considerations for the writing process First and foremost, you need to consider your future audience carefully in order to determine both how specific your topic can be and how much background information you need to provide in your proposal.

  4. How to Write a Research Proposal

    How to Write a Research Proposal | Examples & Templates Published on October 12, 2022 by Shona McCombes and Tegan George. Revised on November 21, 2023. A research proposal describes what you will investigate, why it's important, and how you will conduct your research.

  5. Proposal Essay Examples: Convincing Ideas for Your Research Paper or Essay

    Proposal Essay Examples: Convincing Ideas for Your Research Paper or Essay Dive into the power of persuasive writing through captivating proposal essay examples. Explore ideas that inspire, enrich your work, and unlock impactful proposal crafting. Prepare to elevate your writing and leave a lasting impression!

  6. Free Proposal Essay Examples. Best Topics, Titles GradesFixer

    Free Proposal Essay Examples. Best Topics, Titles GradesFixer Home — Essay Types — Proposal Essay Examples Essay examples Essay topics Writing Tips Questions & answers Choose your topic: All Arts & Culture Business Economics Education Entertainment Environment Geography & Travel Government & Politics Information Science and Technology

  7. How to Write a Proposal Essay like a Pro : Guide + Example (2023)

    How to Write a Proposal Essay like a Pro : Guide + Example (2023) How to Write a Proposal Essay/Argument Last Updated: 24 August 2023 It is common for students to be assigned to a proposal essay assignment. Although many can write it based on the essay prompt, 4 out of 10 students find it hard to complete a proposal argument essay.

  8. 6.5 Writing Process: Creating a Proposal

    Draft a thesis statement and create an organizational plan. Compose a proposal that develops your ideas and integrates evidence from sources. Implement strategies for drafting, peer reviewing, and revising.

  9. Ultimate Guide To Writing A Proposal Essay

    1. Your Interests: Choose a topic that you are passionate about or interested in. This will make the research and writing process more enjoyable and engaging. 2. Relevance: Choose a topic that is relevant to your audience or community. This will make your proposal more compelling and increase the likelihood of it being accepted. 3.

  10. Proposal Essay Examples

    504 Best Proposal Essay Examples Employee Engagement and Retention: Sustainability Topic For this semester, the author would like to explore the topics of employee engagement and retention. The author hopes to learn more about the concepts of employee engagement and retention throughout the semester. Subjects: Business Employees Management Pages: 1

  11. How to Write an Essay Proposal + Examples

    How to Write an Essay Proposal + Examples By: Tasha Kolesnikova 12 min 0 10.04.2022 For those who are interested in learning how to write an essay, the question "how to write a proposal for an essay" usually occurs first. Table Of Contents What is an essay proposal? What to include in an essay proposal Prewriting Stage What is an essay proposal?

  12. Sample Proposal Argument

    an Excelsior University site Argument & Critical Thinking » Argumentative Purposes » Sample Proposal Argument Sample Proposal Argument Now that you have had the chance to learn about writing a proposal argument, it's time to see what one might look like.

  13. Sample Academic Proposals

    Sample Academic Proposals Select the Sample Academic Proposals PDF in the Media box above to download this file and read examples of proposals for conferences, journals, and book chapters.

  14. How To Write An Essay Proposal

    Table of Contents What Is A Proposal Essay? What Is The Goal Of An Essay Proposal? Why You Might Need An Essay Proposal How To Write A Proposal For An Essay Essay Proposal Example How To Start A Proposal Essay How To Write Proposal: A Step-by-Step Guide Essay Proposal Format Tips And Hints On How To Write A Proposal Essay What Is A Proposal Essay?

  15. 414 Proposal Essay Topics + Writing Guide & Example

    📃 Proposal Essay Example FAQ 🔗 References 🔤 What Is a Proposal Essay? We'll deliver a custom paper tailored to your requirements. We'll even cut 15% OFF your first order! Use discount A proposal essay is an academic paper in which you propose something and justify your recommendation.

  16. Proposal Essay Examples: How to Write a Winning Proposal

    Proposal Essay Examples: How to Write a Winning Proposal Writing a proposal essay can be a challenging task for students, especially for those who are new to academic writing.

  17. Effective Proposal Essay Examples for Inspiring Writing

    Proposal Essay Examples September 11, 2021 What Is a Proposal Essay? A proposal essay is a type of academic writing that describes the proposed course of action and its impact on readers. It explains why the proposal іs better than thе current course оf action or alternative courses of action.

  18. Proposal Essay Examples: Inspiring Ideas and Writing Strategies

    Examples of a proposal essay - employ various persuasive techniques, such as logical reasoning, compelling evidence, and rhetorical devices, to make a convincing case for the proposed solution. Proposal essays play a crucial role in driving change because they provide concrete plans of action.

  19. How to Write a Research Proposal

    Research proposal examples. Writing a research proposal can be quite challenging, but a good starting point could be to look at some examples. We've included a few for you below. Example research proposal #1: 'A Conceptual Framework for Scheduling Constraint Management'.

  20. Explore Free Proposal Essay Examples: Topics, Outlines, Samples

    Proposal Essay Examples Characteristics of a Good Proposal Example of a Climate Proposal What is the Proposal Essay structure? · Introduction · Proposal Plan of Action Will your Proposal work? Outline and Format of Proposal Essays Do you need Proposal Essay samples? You are at the right place Also, check out the Proposal Essay topics

  21. 30 Proposal Essay Topics That Are Easy and Fun to Write

    This type of essay can be super easy (and also pretty fun) to write. All you need is the right topic. The right topic involves planning, research, and passion. Below, I'll show you how to choose the right topic and give you some example proposal essay topics that you can either use as is or use as inspiration to come up with your own topic.

  22. How To Write A Proposal Essay In 2023?

    12.95$ Order now How To Write A Proposal Essay In 2023? May 4, 2023 Basic Essay Writing Tips Last modified on September 7th, 2023 Introduction - page three should be banned. Page three is a feature in the Sun newspaper which has a topless woman in it. It should be banned because it goes against the family-friendly nature of the paper

  23. Research Proposal Example (PDF + Template)

    Detailed Walkthrough + Free Proposal Template. If you're getting started crafting your research proposal and are looking for a few examples of research proposals, you've come to the right place. In this video, we walk you through two successful (approved) research proposals, one for a Master's-level project, and one for a PhD-level ...

  24. EU AI Act: first regulation on artificial intelligence

    This includes AI systems that generate or manipulate image, audio or video content, for example deepfakes. Next steps. On December 9 2023, Parliament reached a provisional agreement with the Council on the AI act. The agreed text will now have to be formally adopted by both Parliament and Council to become EU law.